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I 



ftatc of (Bottncftifut 



To The Honorable, The General Assembly of the State of Con- 
necticut : May Session, 1873. 

The Railroad Commissioners herewith respectfully submit 
their Twentieth Annual Report : 

The Reports of the several railroad companies for the pre- 
sent year are made in accordance with the amended law pass- 
ed last session of the Legislature. This law fixed the thirtieth 
of September as the date upon which the annual report of all 
companies should close. The late date at which the law was 
passed, and the short time remaining before the close of the 
year to be reported, made some difficulty in collecting the re- 
turns for this year. 

Another embarrassment aroso from the fact that some com- 
panies had, in previous years, made up their returns to the 
31st of December. Such companies then had but nine 
months, from the close of the year already reported by them, 
to the close as now required by law, upon which to report 
operations. The commissioners, considering that the present 
statute is a new law, with a form different in many respects, 
required all companies to present full reports, for one year, 
ending September 30th, in strict compliance with the provis- 
ions of the statute Some companies therefore in presenting 
these returns for a full year, necessarily have included three 
months already reported last year under the old form. Where 
records of the exact items required in the new schedule had 
not been kept, they are estimated as nearly as practicable, so 



that the returns for the year may be complete. These diffi- 
culties, pertaining to the adoption of a new form, will not 
again occur. The fact that a part of (he year's operations 
has been before reported, and is now again included, does not 
alter the value of this report as showing the result of opera- 
tions for one year. 

Returns are herewith given from twenty-two corporations, 
having their road wholly or in part in this state, representing 
in all 1,268 miles of road. Of this length 105 miles are yet 
unfinished, leaving 1,103 miles in operation, of which 868 
miles are within this state. This gives an average of one 
mile of unfinished road to every 5-?^ square miles of terri- 
tory, and to every 620 inhabitants in the state. Since render- 
ing the last report tbe Boston, Hartford and Erie has com- 
menced operating about twenty-five additional miles between 
Putnam and Willimantic, and tbe Danbury and Norwalk has 
completed a connection with the Shepaug Valley about six 
miles in length. 

The whole capital stock reported is $44,844,550.00, and 
the paid in capital $35,460,117.66. Increase of paid in cap- 
ital since the last report, $4,468,673.40. About 35 per cent, 
of the capital stock issued, is owned or held in this state, and 
about 44 per cent, of tbe capital paid in. The number of 
stock-holders within this state is 4,005, giving an average 
held by each stock-holder of $8,942.98. 

The amount of the funded and floating debt is $43,273,- 
492.85, an increase since tbe last report of $24,412,442.16. 
This increase is mostly accounted for by the funded debt of 
the Boston, Hartford and Erie corporation, which is included 
in this amount, and was not last year reported. The amount 
of this funded debt is also included in tbe total " cost of road 
and equipment." and represents the cost of that road to the 
bond-holders, by whose trustees the report for the company is 
made. The whole cost of roads and their equipment is $74,- 
074,087.40. In round numbers the total cost or permanent 
investment is $74,000,000, of which $31,000,000 or about 42 
per cent, is paid for, leaving an indebtedness of $43,000,000 
or about 58 per cent, of the whole. 



The average cost of the road and equipment per mile is 
$58,404.12; the highest being the New Haven, Middletown 

and Willimantic, which, though but a single track road, cost 
$106,401.00 per mile, and the next highest the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford, which cost $105,393.95 for a 
double track road. 

The total amount given as " cost of road and equipment" 
is manifestly incorrect, and should be greater, since the cost 
of road given by the New London Northern and by the Shore 
Line represents the cost of their stock and bonds to the pre- 
sent companies, which became owners of their respective 
roads by foreclosure of mortgage. In the same manner the 
cost per mile for the construction and equipment of these two 
named roads, should doubtless be greater than represented in 
the table, as the amount there given represents only the act- 
ual cost to the present company. The lowest actual cost per 
mile for construction and equipment is in the case of the She- 
paug Valley, which cost $25,417.32 per mile. 

The report shows 'a large addition to the rolling stock for 
the year. The number of locomotives has increased from 243 
to 277 : passenger cars from 311 to 335, and merchandise cars 
from 4,041 to 4,705. 

The number of men employed by the companies represented 
exclusive of any engaged in construction, is 0,506, which fur- 
nishes an average per mile for themilcs now in operation of Of 1 ,,. 

The total mileage amounts to. 5,679,594 miles for all 
trains, being 585,312 miles more than last year. The num- 
ber of passengers carried in the cars is 10,184^,633, an increase 
of 625,814; tons of merchandise transported 3,162,473 ; in- 
crease 440,242 tons. 

The total cost of operating all the roads is 87,489,521.00, 
which amount is about 60 per cent, of the gross earnings. Of 
this amount about 28 per cent, is for" maintenance of way ;" 
29 per cent, for " maintenance of motive power and cars," 
and 43 per cent for " miscellaneous'"' expenditures. The av- 
erage cost .per mile of road for operating is $6,434.29. This 
varies from $18,000 on the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford, to S500 on the Shepaug Valley. But since this cost is 



6 

increased or diminished in proportion to the number of trains 
and the business done upon the road, the cost, proportioned 
to each mile in length, furnishes no reliable information. The 
cost per train mile run, averages $1.31, being precisely the 
same average cost as that given by the Railroad Commission- 
ers of Massachusetts, in their report of the same year's ope- 
rations. The highest is $1.53 on the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford, and the lowest fifty-three cents on the Shcpaug 
Valley. Of this average cost of $1.31 per mile run, 3O1V cents 
is for maintenance of way ; 38^ cents for maintenance of 
motive power and cars, and 56^ ff cents for miscellaneous ex- 
penditures. " Maintenance of way" includes repairs of road, 
bridges, stations and buildings ; " maintenance of motive 
power and cars " includes repairs of locomotives and cars and 
cost of fuel, oil and waste. The cost of fuel per mile run is 
15 T 8 jy cents. " Miscellaneous expenditures " includes salaries, 
wages, and all items of cost not found in the foregoing except 
interest. 

The gross earnings for the year arc $11,368,425.26, or 
about 25 per cent, of the whole capital stock, and 11 per cent, 
of the whole cost of road and equipment. Income over last 
year $771,301.19. About 50 per cent, of the total earnings 
is received from passengers, and 43 per cent, from freight. 
The sum paid for interest is more than 10 per cent, of the 
gross receipts, amounting to $1,199,660.81. 

The average income per mile operated is $9,766.69, from 
which, after deducting operating expenses and interest, there 
remains a net income of $2,319.19 per mile. The total net 
income is $3,169,902.41, and is 7 per cent, of the whole Cap- 
ital stock, and 4,% per cent, of the whole cost of road and 
equipment. 

Dividends were paid by ten corporations, amounting to 
$2,271,143.00, which amount is 6 r % per cent, on the paid in 
capital of all the roads in the staae, and 3 per cent, on the 
cost of all roads and equipment. This amount is also 7 -ft per 
cent, on the paid in capital of the ten dividend-paying com- 
panies. 

The tabular columns of income from each passenger and 



ton of freight for each mile carried should show the exact 
average rate per mile received from passengers and freight 
for the year l-epresented. The amounts in each passenger 
column are -found by dividing the whole passenger receipts 
by the whole passenger mileage or " number of passengers 
carried one mile." An examination of the table will show 
that there must be errors. From the manner in which some 
companies have kept their account of each passenger trip, 
only an approximate amount for the passenger mileage can 
be obtained, in which case the rate for each passenger, as 
found by this process, would vary from the true rate. The 
average fare received on all roads, as shown in this man- 
ner, is 2 61-100ths cents per mile for passengers, and 
4 5-10ths cents per ton for freight. 

From the foregoing statistics, derived from the tables and 
returns herewith submitted in full, it would appear that while 
the operation of the railroads taken as a whole is not a failure, 
real success or prosperity is attained by only about one half 
of the companies. The total net income of 4 2-10ths per 
cent, on the whole cost of road and equipment, is a less per 
cent, dividend on the whole investment than is received for 
interest by the holders of bonds. 

The result here reached may assist in determining the pro- 
priety of regulating fares and freights by law. If 2 61-100ths 
cents per mile is the average rate of fare a certain proportion 
of travel must have been at a lower, as well as a higher 
rate. The class of people who have received the benefit of 
the lowest rate of fare are commuters and holders of season 
tickets, for the greater part, men whose occupation is in 
cities but who live in towns and villages adjacent, and who 
daily go and return from their homes to their work. If a 
rate per mile was established by law, as low as was consid- 
ered compatible with the successful operation of a railroad, 
the company conducting its operations would not, for it could 
not, consistent with its own success, provide lower rates for 
commuters and other every-day travellers. Such is the case 
on the New York Central Road, where the limit by law is 2 



cents per mile on all trains. No passenger, however often he 
may travel, can procure passage for any less. 

The Railroad Commissioners of Massachusetts, in their 
most able report for this year, have entered into the subject 
of fares and freights at great length, and in referring to the 
case of the New York Central. They report as follows: * 

"When a similar law, applying to all roads in the Com- 
monwealth paying more than eight per cent, dividends per 
annum, was proposed in (lie legislature of 1871, the discussion 
upon it elicited such unexpected results from its operation 
that the measure was rejected. For instance, though the bill 
was limited to roads paying annual dividends of eight per 
cent, and upwards, the effect of competition made it apply to 
other roads which cither paid less dividends, or, in some 
cases, had never paid any dividend at all : practically threat- 
ening such roads with bankruptcy. Again, there is not a con- 
siderable business center in the Commonwealth which is not 
surrounded by towns in which people have settled, built 
houses and effected every arrangement for residence, relying 
upon a regular and very cheap access by rail to their places 
of daily business. A law which substituted a uniform rate 
of two cents per mile for the commutation rates at which 
such persons now travel would necessitate an entire change 
in their modes of life. Such a system might work well where 
a community has grown up under it; if, however, suddenly 
by act of legislature introduced into a community which has 
established itself under the discriminating tariffs always hith- 
erto in use in Massachusetts, the commissioners do not see 
how it could fail to produce the most disastrous results." 

After stating that those who travel most on the roads in 
that state, " instead of paying two cents per mile, now pay 
but from one-quarter of a cent to one and one-half cents per 
mile," they continue as follows : 

" The rule of uniform mileage is also wholly opposed to the 
fundamental principle of taxation, that the burden should in 
all cases be so imposed as to rest most heavily where it will be 



* Fourth Annual Report 11. R. Commissioners Mass., page 53. 



least felt. The man who travels every day over a given route, 
has a right, on every principle of economy, to buy his passage 
at wholesale rates, and to him a concession is a matter of 
great moment ; whereas, it is of comparatively little conse- 
quence what he pays, within reasonable limits, to the man 
who travels very rarely. A law, therefore, which imposes an 
additional cent per mile on the daily traveller to give it to the 
occasional one does not seem to place the burden of taxation 
where it is least felt. 

" The commissioners are inclined to believe that the system 
of discriminating rates now generally in use on the Massa- 
chusetts roads is not only more profitable to the corporations 
than the uniform price per mile system of the New York 
roads, but it at the same time is more advantageous to the 
travelling community through its practical adjustment of the 
burdens." 

The views here given have a practical bearing upon the 
question of the expediency of establishing uniform rates by 
law. Whether special rates for different companies, estab- 
lished by law, would be better for the public at large than the 
present system of various and fluctuating rates, controlled by 
circumstances or by competition, is difficult to determine. 

The list of accidents is given with the return of each com- 
pany and covers the same period of time for which the return 
is made. The list given in the body of the report last year 
was brought forward to the time of writing the report, for 
which reason the list now given by each company covers a 
part of the same time, and some of the names given in the 
last report will thus be again found in this. The proportion 
of accidents for the time reported or to the number of passen- 
gers carried, will not be affected, but the accidents for the 
year are thus made to conform to the other doings reported. 
The whole number for the year resulting in serious personal 
injury is 85 ; of these 54 were fatal and 31 not fatal. But 
one accident resulting in the death of a passenger has oc- 
curred, and that was caused by jumping from the cars while 
in motion. No serious injury has happened to any passenger 
who kept in proper place in conformity to rules and regula- 
2 



10 

tions, while more than ten millions of passengers have been 
transported. Of the whole number of accidents resulting in 
injury or death, 7 occurred to persons at crossings ; 7 to per- 
sons jumping on or off the cars while in motion ; 10 to per- 
sons falling from trains ; 38 to persons walking or lying upon 
the track, 9 of whom were intoxicated ; 6 to employees while 
coupling cars ; 4 to boys stealing a ride ; all others number- 
ing 13. 

As will be seen, the largest proportion of accidents occurs 
to persons walking or lying upon the track ; some apparently 
sleeping in utter disregard of any danger, others incapable of 
comprehending any danger through intoxication. It is prob- 
ably impossible to provide a remedy against such recklessness, 
but if a law was passed making it illegal for persons, who are 
not employed on the road, to walk on the track, it would as- 
sist in making the danger more apparent, and would doubtless, 
deter some from taking this course. 

Attempting to get on and off cars while in motion is anoth- 
er fruitful source of accidents. The warning plainly given 
by the fate of so many, seems to have no effect in diminish- 
ing this dangerous practice. From the train newsboy, who 
daily and hourly repeats it, to the occasional passenger, who 
waits until after a train has started to speak his last word, 
then throws himself aboard, a large number seem to delight 
in taking this risk every year. It is difficult to see how legis- 
lation can be made to accomplish a reform in this respect. 

Accidents of this class also frequently occur to hoys and 
others who take advantage of the opportunity afforded , by the 
low rate of speed which trains are required to run across 
streets and at other places in cities, to cling to trains, thus 
endangering themselves and annoying both passengers and 
employees. On this point there is already a statute (act of 
1865 and amendment of 1867) prohibiting such proceedings. 
The railroad companies hesitate to enforce the law and inflict 
the penalties prescribed, as in many cases a malicious dispo- 
sition aroused would vent its spite in stoning cars at night, 
placing obstructions on the track, or other vicious acts, in 
which it would be impossible to trace the offender. The rem- 



11. 

edy would seem to be in the action or assistance of the local 
authorities, who could bring the offenders to punishment, and 
where regulations, making such opportunities possible, are 
establisbed for the very purpose of preventing accidents, it is 
but justice that the local authorities should render every 
assistance to prevent this dangerous practice. 

During the past winter two accidents occurred to passenger 
trains, which might have resulted in loss of life, but fortu- 
nately noiie were killed and but few seriously injured. One 
occurred on the Housatonic to the morning train from New 
Milford. A. cavity had been washed out under the embank- 
ment but beneath the frost, so that the embankment appeared 
solid and whole on the surf ce. The locomotive passed safely 
over but the track gave way beneath the passenger car, the 
trucks of which were torn entirely off and remained in the 
chasm, while the car was dragged on resting upon the rails. 
No one was injured. A trackman, whose duty it was to in- 
spect the track of this section, before the passage of the early 
train, on that morning failed to go over the road. By the 
performance of that duty the accident would have been pre- 
vented. The employee was immediately discharged, which 
was perhaps all the penalty that could be imposed, but which 
seems to be no commensurate punishment for the criminal 
carelessness by which many lives were so exposed. 

The other accident occurred on the New Haven and North- 
hampton road on the 30th of January, to the 5.45 P. M. train 
going north, when about four miles from New Haven. The 
rear passenger car was thrown from the track by a broken 
rail and turned over down an embankment about 5 feet high. 
By this accident 15 passengers were injured, two quite severe- 
ly, the rest slightly. Upon investigation it was found that 
the broken rail was of the pattern used with the " Fish plate," 
was 30 feet long, weighing 62 lbs. to the yard. This rail was 
first laid in June 1869, but was put in the place where it was 
broken two days before the accident, to take the place of one 
that was not considered reliable : this one having been selected 
for a good rail, where a good one was needed, and had no flaw 
in it. One end of the rail was in the head block of switch, 



12 

the other end fastened with. a "Fish bar." No motion was 
felt on the engine while that was passing over it, indicating 
that the rail was not broken previous to the passage of this 
train. Apparently the trucks of the engine broke off a piece 
of the rail about 8 or 10 inches in length, which the following 
trucks knocked out of the track, causing the rear car to run 
off. The train was running at usual speed at this place, hav- 
ing 17 minutes time from New Haven to Ives' Station, a dis- 
tance of I^Jts miles. The section man saw this rail at 4 P. M. 
of that day, and also followed the freight train down after 
that, and found the track all in proper order, leaving no room 
to doubt but that the rail was broken by the train to which the 
accident occurred. The duties of the section men required 
them to go over the track twice a day and sometimes more. 
The accident happened the day following the coldest night of 
the winter. 

The condition of each road and the particular business per- 
taining to it are more fully given hereafter in the separate re- 
port of each company. In general, the good condition and 
careful management before reported have been sustained, and 
the business has increased. A great improvement has been 
made in the rolling stock, by tlte application of the Westing- 
haus brake and the Miller platform and coupler now in use 
upon several leading roads. The proof is abundant of the su- 
periority of these inventions for the better working of trains, 
and the prevention of accidents. Some self-coupling device 
applicable to freight trains is greatly needed, and would lessen 
the danger to employees. 

Several petitions have been received and acted upon by this 
Board, asking for gates or flagmen to be* stationed at highway 
crossings. Only two flagmen have been established by the 
Board since rendering the last report, one at Stamford, on the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford, the other at Yantic, on 
the New London Northern. 

To determine what would be for the public safety and inter- 
est is made the duty of the Commissioners in this matter, and 
is sometimes difficult to do. The danger at grade crossings 
cannot be wholly removed, but by the exercise of the greatest 



13 

caution to observe approaching trains it may in most cases be 
avoided. But there is a question as to how far a railroad 
company may be justified in levying this contribution of care 
upon a whole community, and at what point the company 
should itself be made to take up the burden. 

Reference was made last year to the necessity of an amend- 
ment of the laws in regard to fences on the roads laid out and 
built before the passage of the present laws. The necessity 
still exists. On three different roads, the Housatonic, the 
New Haven and Northampton, and the Norwich and "Worces- 
ter, a considerable portion of the line has no fence adjoining 
private land owners. That the whole line of a railroad should 
be fenced, is conceded by all, on grounds of public safety, and 
is proved by the fact that the law now requires all companies 
on taking land for railroad purposes, to fence the same. An 
extended report of the action of the Commissioners in one 
case, upon this point may be found in the remarks concerning 
the New Haven and Northampton Company. As will there 
be seen, the Commissioners are restrained by decision of the 
Superior Court from proceeding further in the case in ques- 
tion. In view of the impracticable application of the laws in 
this and many other cases, the Commissioners respectfully 
urge upon your honorable body the necessity of a thorough 
revision of the laws in regard to fencing. 

A great mistake is made and a public injury inflicted, by 
the failure of railroad companies to conform to the established 
time for the running of trains. Accidents may occur making 
failures and delays unavoidable in particular cases, interrup- 
tions to which all will reasonably submit, but their daily and 
continued occurrence should not be looked upon with allow- 
ance. The company agrees to transport passengers a certain 
distance, within a certain time, for a fixed remuneration. A 
continued daily failure on the part of any company to carry 
passengers the whole distance proposed and paid for, would 
not be submitted to, especially if pay for carrying the whole 
distance was retained. Whatever argument will show that 
passengers should be carried the distance agreed, will also 
show that they should be carried in the time agreed, for both 



14 

are conditions upon which the traveller depends. To the man 
of business it is often of vital importance to reach a certain 
place, or make a certain connection, as he has previously 
planned. With the certainty or probability that he could not 
accomplish it, he would adopt some other course. The failure 
of a company to carry him within the specified time is as 
great an injury as if it had failed to carry him the specified 
distance. 

The remedy is to be found in a more careful calculation of 
the resources of the company ; for its ability to carry a large 
or small number of passengers within a certain time, depends 
upon the promptness with which they can be received or dis- 
charged at stations, the capability of the rolling stock, espe- 
cially the motive power, and the condition of the road and 
track to be used. A lack in any of these departments should 
not be an excuse for the daily delay of trains, for the ability 
to do a certain specified thing should not be assumed, but es- 
tablished upon fact, and being established may become the 
basis of a reliable agreement. If then, for any of these rea- 
sons the time has been so fixed, that the company agrees to do 
something it cannot do, the time should be changed to con- 
form to what the company, with the means it has at command, 
actually can do. 



15 



DETAILED CONDITION' OP THE ROADS. 



NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD. 

This company reports for the first time under its new name, 
the consolidation of the New York and New Haven and the 
Hartford and New Haven, having been effected on the 6th day 
of August, 1872. At that date the latter was merged into 
the former, and the name of the former was changed to the 
New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company. 

Previous to that date, and since August 3d, 1870, the two 
roads have been operated together as one road under a part- 
nership agreement or lease. " According to that partnership 
agreement, the consolidated capital was to be divided between 
the two companies upon the basis of 57 per cent, to the New 
York and New Haven, and 43 per cent, to the Hartford and 
New Haven. Under this division the stockholders of the 
New York and New Haven would have received less, and the 
stockholders of the Hartford and New Haven more than one 
share of the new stock for each share of their own stock. To 
obviate this difficulty, it was arranged that the stockholders 
of each of the two companies should receive one share of the 
stock of the consolidated company for each share of stock 
held by them, and that any balance due the stockholders of 
the Hartford and New Haven should be paid in cash by the 
consolidated company. The Hartford and New Haven also 
owned 2,000 shares of its own capital stock, which was not em- 
braced in the property conveyed under the partnership agree- 
ment, but which properly belonged to the stockholders of that 
company. This stock was purchased by the consolidated com- 
pany at its then market value, converted into the stock of the 
consolidated company, and is now held by it as an asset." 

With the returns, the company report that since the date 
of consolidation, no dividends have been paid by the New 



16 

York, New Haven and Hartford company. Since the last 
annual report of the two companies, and prior to the 6th day 
of August, 1872, the two separate companies paid the follow- 
ing dividends, viz : the New York and New Haven two divi- 
dends of 5 per cent, each on $6,000,000 of full paid capital 
stock, and two dividends of 1\ per cent, each on $3,000,000 
of scrip stock, the sum paid amounting to $750,000; the 
Hartford and New Haven three dividends of 3 per cent, each 
on $3,300,000 of full paid capital stock, and three dividends 
of 1| per cent, each on 13,000,000 of scrip stock, amounting 
to $432,000. In carrying out the terms of the consolidation 
agreement, and in equalizing the value of the properties of 
the two companies, it was found that a considerable balance 
was due the stockholders of the Hartford and New Haven. 
This difference was adjusted by the payment to them by the 
consolidated company, of the sum of $10.33 per share. 
t Out of the surplus of the two separate companies, reported 
for the year ending September 30th, 1871, and of the net 
earnings of the New York, New Haven and Hartford com- 
pany for the year ending September 30th, 1872, there was 
paid in dividends to the stockholders of the New York and 
New Haven $750,000 ; to the stockholders of the Hartford 
and New Haven the sum of $132,000. There was charged 
to profit and loss the amount of $103,230.37, which was a 
claim of the Hartford and New Haven against the New York 
and New Haven, which on consolidation was extinguished. 
There was also charged to profit and loss the sum of $650,- 
790.00, being the $10.33 per share paid to the stockholders of 
the Hartford and New Haven under the consolidation agree- 
ment. 

The main line of the road is now a double track, extending 
from the junction with the Harlem road, near Williams' 
Bridge, in the state of New York, to Springfield, in Massa- 
chusetts, a distance of about 124 miles. About i 8 ths of this 
main line is laid with steel rails. The balance will probably 
be laid with steel during the present season, contracts for steel 
rails sufficient for that purpose having been already made. 
The road is kept in excellent condition. 



17 

This company has a perpetual lease of the Shore Line rail- 
road at an annual rent of $100,000. 

HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL. 

An examination of the returns of this company will show 
that an important business is done on this line, it being the 
third in regard to the number of passengers carried, the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford being first, and the Boston, 
Hartford and Erie second. This road in reality should be 
considered second so far as doing business in this state is 
concerned, as the large number of passengers carried over 
the Boston, Hartford and Erie is mostly made up in Massa- 
chusetts, near Boston, wholly removed from the travel and 
business of this state. The road is a difficult and costly one 
to operate. The expenses of operating are about 80 per cent, 
of the gross earnings, the average for all the roads in the 
state being about 66 per cent. This cost, together with the 
large amount of interest paid, will account for the small net 
income. About 1,100 tons of rails have been laid the past 
year, making good the wear, and somewhat improving the 
condition of the road. 

The taking of a part of the lands of this corporation by 
the Connecticut Western Railroad Company for its branch 
track from Collinsville to New Britain, is mentioned in the 
report of the company. 

Upon a petition for gates at the crossing of this road on 
Main street in the city of Waterbury, and also at the crossing 
of the Naugatuck road upon the same street, an examination 
of the crossings was made and a hearing was held. The 
Commissioners, believing that a gate would prove a serious 
obstacle to public travel upon the highway, and that the dan- 
ger complained of would be remedied by requiring trains to 
pass the crossings at a slow rate of speed, gave orders to that 
effect, but established no gate. 

The route of the branch track of this company for freight 

purposes in the city of Hartford, as chartered by act of the 

last Legislature, crosses the freight branch of the New York, 

New Haven and Hartford road, and also the main passenger 

3 



18 

line of the Connecticut Valley. In the adoption of this route 
the Commissioners were called upon to decide whether one or 
more tracks should be laid across the roads, and believing 
that the business of the proposed road could be well accom- 
modated by one track, and that danger to the passenger trains 
of the Connecticut Valley road would be increased by more 
than one, approved of the laying of only a single track, and 
limited the width of lay-out to 15 feet across these roads. 

NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON. 

This company was authorized by special act of last year to 
increase its capital stock $2,000,000. The additional stock 
has not been issued, but improvements and extensions are in 
contemplation, which if carried out would call for its use. 
The opening of the branch track to Holyoke in Massachusetts, 
completed within the past year, gives a great impetus to the 
business of the road. Its traffic and importance are increas- 
ing, and improvements have been made in its character and 
condition. About 2300 tons of rails have been laid the past 
season, and extensive work has been done in re-ballasting and 
improving the road bed. With its track and road-bed thor- 
oughly put in order, as these are first essential for the safety 
of trains, this company should next give attention to its sta- 
tions, at some of which new and convenient buildings and 
facilities for doing business are greatly needed. Around many 
of the stations north of New Haven a remarkable manufact- 
uring activity exists. More complete facilities for doing busi- 
ness will not only prove a great public good to these sections, 
but also a source of profit to the company. 

Application was made by this company to the commission- 
ers for the discontinuance of three stations, Centervillc, Ives', 
and Mt. Carmel, in the town of Hamden, with a view to the 
establishment of two instead, at such places as the commis- 
sioners should designate. 

Upon examination no objection was found to the change of 
site proposed for the Centervillc station, and it was approved. 
The remaining change contemplated the discontinuance of 
Ives' and Mt. Carmel stations, and the location of one in their 
place at some point nearly central between the two. Around 



19 

these two stations as centers, business has to some degree been 
developed and money expended, with reference to the facili- 
ties afforded by a situation near a railroad depot. A change 
of location could not be effected without more or less injury 
to the business and community so situated, and while the pres- 
ent line is maintained and operated, the commissioners do not 
find sufficient reason for approving the change proposed. A 
new route for this road, for a limited distance past both of 
these stations has been proposed, which, if adopted would 
make a change of site necessary, and perhaps render expedi- 
ent a union of the two. This alteration would materially 
straighten and shorten the line, and would also remove it from 
close proximity to the highway, along the side and partly with- 
in which, it now lies for nearly the whole distance, and would 
doubtless be a great public improvement. 

Upon the complaint of Jeffrey 0. Phelps of Simsbury, in re- 
gard to fences along the line of this railroad adjoining his land, 
the commissioners examined the place, holding no hearing how- 
ever, but having found no fence at the place in question, made 
an order on the 3d day of July, 1871, requiring this company 
to build a fence. A communication from the superintendent 
of the company was soon after received by the commissioners, 
stating that the company had evidence to show that it was 
released from building any fence, and asking for a hearing, 
and a revocation of the order. A hearing was accordingly 
given to both parties. 

By the terms of the deed, which was presented in evidence 
at this hearing, Mr. Phelps received a certain sum for the 
right of way sold to the New Haven and Northampton Com- 
pany, and the statement is made in the deed that the comp.iny 
"is not bound to build or maintain a fence, neither is he him- 
self obligated to, but either party is at liberty to fence or not 
to fence as they please." Mr. Phelps also claimed he had 
received no compensation for fencing. 

As a matter of public safety, in the opinion of the commis- 
sioners, a fence should be maintained at this place. To make 
any application of the laws in regard to fencing of railroads, 
they find very difficult. Since 1850 all railroad companies 



20 

are required tcTbuild all fences. Previous to that date, those 
land owners who received compensation for fencing where they 
sold their lands, are required and may be compelled to main- 
tain a fence. In this case the land-owner claims he has re- 
ceived no compensation. The commissioners however ad- 
judged, and in this opinion had the concurrence of legal 
advice, that since Mr. Phelps had received a compensation 
sufficient to satisfy him for the right of way without any fence, 
or with a fence whenever he himself should choose to build 
one, it may also be considered that he has received compen- 
sation for building a fence when the public safety demands 
one. In accordance therefore with this opinion, the commiss- 
ioners on the 12th day of November, 1872, gave Mr. Phelps 
notice that unless he constructe i a fence within sixty days 
from the date of the same, the New Haven and Northampton 
company would be required to build the fence at his expense 
as provided in section 492, Chap. 7, Title 7, Rev. Stat, 1866. 

Following this action of the commissioners, upon the appli- 
cation of Mr. Phelps and on motion of Johnson and McManus, 
his attorneys, made to Hon. Dwight W. Pardee a Judge of 
the Superior Court, the said Judge on the 19th of December 
1872 issued a Writ of Injunction restraining the commis- 
sioners from proceeding further in the matter until the March 
term of the Superior Court in and for Hartford county, and 
until the said court should make further order in the premises. 
At the March term of the court, on a motion to dissolve the 
injunction, a hearing was held before Judge Phelps, but no 
order for a dissolution was granted by the court. The com- 
missioners are therefore still restrained from proceeding fur- 
ther, and respectfully submit to your honorable body their 
action in the matter, and urge such amendment of the laws 
in regard to fencing on the old roads, as will secure their 
practical working and will be for the safety and interest of 
the public. 

The commissioners allowed a temporary suspension of their 
order concerning the crossing of this road and the Connecti- 
cut Western at Simsbury, until a proposed change of grade 
shall have been completed, when the matter will again be 
taken into consideration. 



21 

NORWICH AND WORCESTER. 

The commissioners have had no call for special services on 
this road the past year. Under a careful management, its 
business has been conducted with regularity and safety and 
to the convenience and satisfaction of the public. Probably 
no road can be found, with an established business, wdiere 
greater effort is made to accommodate the local traffic than 
on this. 

The following is the report of the commissioner of this 
road, for the State Connecticut : 

Commissioner's Thirty-seventh Annual Report to September 

BOth, 1872. 

The undersigned having been called upon to examine the 
accounts of the Norwich and Worcester Railroad Company 
relative to the expenditure of the road, and to decide what 
portion of said expenditures are to be charged to the different 
sections of the road report, that on the 6th day of November, 
1872, 1 examined the accounts of said company up to the 30th 
day of September, 1872, and found that there had been ex- 
pended for the road in Connecticut to the 30th of September, 

1872, - 11,840,597.60 

There had been expended in Massachusetts to 

the 30th of September, 1872, - - - 773,096.(31 
Making the whole cost of the road to Septem- 

ber 30th, 1872, $2,613,694.21 

I further report that the accounts of the expenditures on 
the road in each state have been kept separate and distinct. 
as required by the charter. 

That the receipts of the company for twelve months ending 
September 30th, 1872, were - $771,602.28 

Expenditures for repairs of road, cars, bridges, 
locomotives, station houses, new locomotives, 
new cars, fuel, passengers, and freight ex- 
penses, &c, ------ 478,273.74 

Leaving, $293,328.51 



22 

From which deduct interest, "- 47,670.35 

Leaving^net, after deducting expenses and in 

terest, 245,658.16 

Of which I have set 
To Massachusetts one-third, $81,886. 05^ 

To Connecticut two-thirds, 163,772.10| $245,658. 16 

GEORGE C. RIPLEY, 

Commissioner for Connecticut. 

NEW LONDON NORTHERN. 

The attention of the commissioners was the second time 
called to the Yantic highway crossing on this road, by a peti- 
tion for gates from the selectmen of Norwich, and upon a re- 
examination of the matter, they established a flagman at the 
crossing. 

A petition from a large number of citizens of Norwich was 
received by the commissioners in February, calling their at- 
tention to the condition of this road, the manner of running 
trains and of conducting operations, and asking that the com- 
missioners " take charge of the affairs of the railroad." For 
taking this course the law makes no provision, and very prop- 
erly gives no authority, for if such a proceeding were possible 
it would be more injurious than beneficial. The introduction 
of new elements into the administration of the affairs of a 
company would be likely only to lead to greater disarrange- 
ment and confusion. 

The expression, however, of public dissatisfaction with the 
condition of the road and the want of confidence in its safety, 
plainly made it the duty of the commissioners to examine 
into its affairs, and on finding that evils existed, to take the 
proper course for their remedy. Accordingly, on the 4th and 
5th days of March they proceeded to make an examination 
of the rolling stock and track of the road, and the general 
affairs and management of the company. 

It became apparent upon examination that since the road 
has been operated by the Vermont Central Railroad Company 
the management has not been such as would best accommo- 
date the public on the line of this road, or adapt itself to the 
wants of this particular section. To nearly the same extent 



23 

it has also been injurious to this company. The orders have 
been given from a business center far removed, with reference 
to the best accommodation of through trains, and the greatest 
convenience of the large business of several hundred miles 
of road. Operatives and train-men who had previously been 
for a long time on the road have been changed for those of 
less experience, with this section at least, and a confusion or 
a misunderstanding of orders consequent to inexperienced 
men has resulted in disarrangement of trains and sometimes 
collis on. Added to this, the increased business of the road 
has told heavily upon the rails and joints of the track. 

Previous to this public expression of dissatisfaction, this 
company had become aware of these evils, and had taken ne- 
cessary steps for their remedy. The management, so far as 
it pertains to the controlling of trains and the time of their 
running, the repairs of the road and all its own immediate 
business,_has been resumed by this company. It has secured 
the services of a superintendent of ability and much experi- 
ence, who, the commissioners are confident, will be able to 
correct the evils enumerated. Efforts have been made to re- 
store the train officers and men who are acquainted with the 
business of this road, some of whom have already been rein- 
stated. 

In regard to the prompt running of trains according to time 
tables, and repairs of the road in addition to the plans already 
adopted by the company, the commissioners made such rec- 
ommendations and orders as in their opinion would remove 
further cause for complaint. Apparently, the wear upon the 
track had been greater than the company had made provision 
for, to which fact the attention of its officers was called, both 
at this and the last fall examination. To make up for this 
deficiency, a large quantity of new iron was recommended for 
laying down the present season. The company is planning to 
carry out this recommendation as rapidly as possible. New 
chairs were ordered for putting down immediately in place of 
those broken, and in order to provide properly for the safety 
of passenger trains, until the severity of the winter and state 
of the ground would allow the needed repairs to be made on 



24 

the road, a personal inspection of the track before the passage 
of each passenger train was ordered. 

The commissioners were satisfied of the intention of the 
company to use proper care for the safety of trains, and pro- 
vide as far as lay in its power for the prompt transmission of 
all freights and transaction of all business committed to its 
care. 

HOUSATONIC. 

At the examination of this road it was observed that a great 
amount of work had been done for its permanent improve- 
ment. A new bridge has been built across the Housatonic 
river near New Milford, and the road bed and track have been 
undergoing a thorough renovation. The change should con- 
tinue as rapidly as possible until all the old iron of short pat- 
tern is taken out. Repairs and improvements upon the de- 
pots have been made. An elegant and commodious union 
station has been built in connection with the Connecticut 
Western at the crossing of the latter at Canaan. Other new 
depots are needed for some of which arrangements have al- 
ready been made. 

The return of the company shows a falling off in the re- 
ceipts, the total earnings being less than last year. The 
greater part of this difference is doubtless due to the fact that 
business has found other channels, as two roads, the Connec- 
ticut Western and the Shepaug Valley, have been laid across 
this and commenced active operations within the past year. 

At the crossing of the latter road at Hawleyville, the com- 
missioners established a ball signal for the greater safety of 
trains on both roads, and following the precedent in cases of 
signals before established, and of legislative enactment in re- 
gard to the crossing of the Naugatuck road and the New 
Haven and Derby road at Derby, the commissioners decided 
that the new road should bear the expense of establishing and 
maintaining the signal. The trains of both roads receive the 
benefit of the precaution for safety, but it appeared just to 
the commissioners that the road causing the additional dan- 
ger by crossing one already established, should provide the 
remedy by maintaining the safety-signal. 



25 

This company has leased and now operates the New York, 
Housatonic and Northern from Brookheld junction to Dan- 
bury. 

An error in the return of this company was discovered and 
reported, but too late for an alteration of the figures in the 
printed report. The following changes, under " doings dur- 
ing the year " found on page 118 of this report, will correct 
the return, and should be made, viz: " Number of passen- 
gers carried one mile," reported 7,071,534, should be 4,071,- 
534. " Tons of merchandise carried," reported 233,930, 
should be 242,218 ; " Tons of merchandise carried one mile," 
reported 1,682,240, should be 2,632,805. 

NAUGATUCK. 

This company is relaying with steel rails as fast as the old 
track requires to be removed, about 500 tons of which have 
been laid the past year. The road bed and track are kept in 
excellent order, and the commissioners very seldom find any 
occasion for recommending repairs. 

The depot accommodations at Winsted are inconvenient 
and should be improved. At this place the Connecticut 
Western Company, having laid no track of its own, uses the 
track of this company for a short distance, and on account of 
the failure of the two companies to agree in regard to certain 
arrangements for the tracks and depot grounds, no progress 
has been made towards furnishing the needed accommoda- 
tions. 

The action of the commissioners on the petition for gates 
at the Main street crossings in the city of Waterbury has 
been noticed in the report of the Hartford, Providence and 
Fishkill. 

NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON. 

This company has but few miles of road in this State, but 
as a part of one of the New York and Boston express lines, 
the road and its business are important. An immense traffic 
is also carried on over this road in connection with the line of 
boats from Stonington to New York. About 20 miles of 
double track have been completed in Rhode Island. No 
great changes have been made in Connecticut the past year. 
4 



26 

SHORE LINK. 

This road is now operated by the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Company under a lease, and lias been undergo- 
ing a thorough system of repairs. A large amount of new 
iron has been put down and reballasting of the track has been 
carried on to considerable extent. The approaches of the 
Connecticut river bridge have been straightened, removing 
a very sharp curve which existed at one end. A new depot 
lias been built at Saybrook Junction. Improvements in the 
depot at New London, which are greatly needed, are already 
under consideration. A new bridge at Fair Haven has been 
contracted for. 

BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE. 

The return for this company is made by trustees, according 
to whose statement the company itself is in bankruptcy and 
its road in possession of its creditors, for which reason the 
items of cost, capital stock and debt, which are yet to be ascer- 
tained, cannot be given in this report. 

The Boston, Hartford and Erie railroad comprises the whole 
line, both from Boston and Providence to the Hudson river, 
including the unfinished part from Waterbury westward ; 
the road from Brookline, Mass., to Woonsocket, R. I., and 
from East Thompson to Southbridge, Mass. 

The report of the characteristics, traffic, income and ex- 
penses, as given in the schedule accompanying, applies to the 
line from Boston to Willimantic and branches only, and docs 
not include the Norwich and Worcester division nor the Hart- 
ford, Providence and Fishkill division, which report directly 
through their own officers. 

The section between Willimantic and Putnam was opened 
in August last, near the close of the year, for which the reports 
are made out, consequently but a very small share of the busi- 
ness operations reported, can pertain to that part of the road. It 
is well built, the bridges are good and the masonry substantial. 
The abutments and pier of the Quinnebaug river bridge were 
especially noticed for their solidity and good workmanship. 
A large proportion of the highways are carried over or under. 



27 

Several of the highway bridges are fine iron structures of the 
" how-string " pattern. The road is built with a view to the 
accommodation of a large business. 

CONNECTICUT VALLEY. 

At Saybrook this road has been extended across the cove 
to the lower point. In Hartford the grading is nearly com- 
pleted for the connection of this road with the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford, when the northern terminus of 
the road will be the Asylum street depot. The utmost en- 
deavor has been made by the officers of this company to 
accommodate the business along its line, furnishing to every 
village and hamlet, depot facilities and means for accommo- 
dating all branches of home industry and trade. 

CONNECTICUT WESTERN. 

This road has made a vast improvement since the render- 
ing of the last report. At that time trains had commenced 
running, but at a limited rate of speed, the road being in many 
respects unfinished. The track has since been ballasted, 
stations have been built, fences nearly completed, and the 
road put in good working order. 

In accordance with the charter granted to this company for 
the construction of a branch from Collinsville to New Britain, 
the directors adopted a route which was presented to the 
commissioners for their approval early in the fall. This route 
on approaching New Britain lies parallel with the Hartford, 
Providence and Fishkill railroad for a distance of about three 
miles, and the lay-out presented over-lapped and covered a 
part of the land owned by that company and included within 
its boundaries, though not occupied by any of its tracks. 

The Boston, Hartford and Erie Company, the prospective 
owners of the Hartford, Providence and Fishkill and all its 
franchises by virtue of an agreement of purchase entered into 
but not yet consummated, strenuously opposed the taking of 
any of the lands of this latter company by another railroad 
corporation, claiming that all the land now owned by it would 
be needed for future use for laying additional tracks ; that 
the taking of such lands would be an unwarrantable inter- 



28 

ference with the franchise of that company ; and that a more 
feasible route for the new road could be obtained. 

The Commissioners, after due examination, became fully 
convinced that the route asked for was the most feasible, and 
that ample room was left for the laying of a double track and 
suitable side tracks. Furthermore, in the decision of the Su- 
preme Court in the case of the " New York, Housatonic and 
Northern against the Boston, Hartford and Erie," (C. R., 
Vol. 36, page 200), we find the following: 

" The public have an interest in the location of railroads run- 
ning near each other as these do. An unreasonable quantity 
of land should not be taken for railroad purposes. Therefore 
when practicable, the tracks should lie side by side. If the 
respondents should be compelled to go outside of the petition- 
ers' location, as claimed, nearly double the quantity of land 
now required would be necessary. Another consequence 
would be that the land owners and the public having occasion 
to cross the railroad, would have two to cross within a short 
distance of each other instead of one. The interests of the 
public then would be promoted by requiring these roads to 
run near each other and at the same grade. If we add to 
this the fact that in this way the two roads can bo much more 
economically constructed and maintained, it is apparent that 
the interests of all concerned, the railroad companies, the 
land owners, and the public concur." 

All of the above is applicable to this case, and in view of 
all the facts presented, the location of the new route as asked 
for was granted. 

No further action has been taken by the Commissioners 
since the report of last year concerning the Albany Avenue 
crossing in the city of Hartford, and no further move has 
been made by the company. 

DANBURY AND NORWALK. 

The report of this company as usual shows a profitable 
business. The road is kept in good repair, the cost of ope- 
rating, as appears from the returns, being less than GO per 
cent, of the total earnings. An extension six miles in length, 



29 

from Bethel to Hawleyville, was completed in July last, con. 
necting at the latter place with the Shcpaug Valley road, thus 
opening a continuous route from Litchfield hy way of Bethel 
and Norwalk to New York. 

NEW HAVEN AND DERBY. 

An enterprising business is done on this line, but a great 
part of the total income is covered by the cost of operating. 
This appears to be over 86 per cent, of the gross earnings. 
Within the past year the road-bed and track have been finish- 
ed up, and this short road bids fair to become an important 
link. 

NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLIMANTIC. 

The lay-out of this road from the town of Portland to Wil- 
limantic was presented to the commissioners for their approval 
in June last, and was accepted by them. Previous to making 
the application the company had already completed the great- 
er part of the grading and heavy work on that part of the 
line. The road is now nearly finished, only about three miles 
of track remaining to be laid. The company expect soon to 
have it in readiness for the running of through trains. 

About the first of February a communication was received 
by the commissioners through His Excellency Governor Jew- 
ell, from Gen. E. YV. Serrcll, former chief engineer of this 
line, stating that such changes from the original plans were 
being made in the iron viaducts on this line as would render 
them unsafe for use. The important character of the works 
referred to, and the near completion of the road, at which 
time and before being used for passenger trains, it would be- 
come the duty of the commissioners to give a certificate of its 
safety, induced them to procure an expert of the best engin- 
eering ability, to immediately examine and report on the 
same. The same reasons also led them to include in this ex 
animation the iron bridge across the Connecticut river. They 
accordingly secured the services of Mr. James Laurie, civil 
engineer, whose report as being of general interest regarding 
iron structures is herewith given in full : 



30 

Hartford, April 19th, 1873- 

To the General Railroad Commissioners of the State of Connecticut .- 

Gentlemen — Having agreeably to your request examined the 
Iron Bridge across the Connecticut river at Middletown, also two 
iron Trestle Bridges on the line of the New Haven, Middletown and 
Willimantic Railroad with the view to determine their strength and 
sufficiency, and having completed the investigations, I have now the 
honor to submit the following 

REPORT. 

The bridge across the Connecticut is 1,250^ feet in length. It has 
four long spans of 20G feet each between the points of support, or 
209' 8" from center of piers. There is also a Turntable Draw of 
303 feet extreme length, having two clear openings of 130 feet each 
at low water, also two end spans of 54 feet each. 

The superstructure is built for a single track only, and is composed 
of two Trellis trusses 26 feet in height placed 16^ feet apart from 
center to center, leaving 15' 1" in the clear. The lower chords are 
composed of flat iron links connected by wrought iron pins ; and the 
upper chords are formed of two vertical channel beams twelve inches 
deep, strengthened by plate iron on the tops and sides. 

The diagonal struts are composed of the Keystone Bridge Com- 
pany's rolled iron segments for pillars, and the diagonal ties are flat 
bars enlarged at the ends so as to be attached to the chord pins. 

The Trestle Bridges are built for a double track ; one called the 
" Lyman Viaduct," which crosses Dickinson's brook, in the town of 
Colchester is 1,108.4 feet in length, and varies in height from 28 to 1 28 
feet. The other, called the " Hapallo Viaduct." crosses Flat Brook 
valley in the town of Chatham, is 1,380 feet in length, and varies 
from 30 to 60 feet in height. Both viaducts have uniform spans of 
3(1 feet between the columns of support. 

Before proceeding to give the result of the examinations, it may 
be proper briefly to refer to the experiences in Europe and this coun- 
try in the use of iron for railroad bridges, and also to the rules which 
have been abopted in proportioning their strength. 

Until the commencement of railroad constructions the working 
strength of wrought iron, excepting as to its tensile resistance, had 
been but little investigated, cast iron having been mainly used to re- 
sist compressive and transverse strains. The first girder and truss 
bridges in England were constructed mainly of cast iron, but as with 
his material the spans were much restricted a combination of 



31 

wrought and cast iron was gradually introduced. Some failures how- 
ever having taken [dace, an extensive series of experiments were 
made under the sanction of the British government both in cast and 
wrought iron as applied in railroad structures, which furnished relia- 
ble data and conclusively proved the superiority of the latter ma- 
terial. 

The government at the same time, conferred on the Board of Trade 
full power to regulate and control the strength of all bridges on rail- 
way- intended for the conveyance of passengers : and since that time 
no new ro id can be opened for public use until all the bridges have 
been examined and tested by officers acting under the authority of 
the Board, and a certificate obtained of the safety and sufficiency of 
the structures. 

Having recently had occasion to report on English and French reg- 
ulations, and on their manner of testing bridges, I insert a few extracts 
having a general bearing on the structures under consideration : 

"By the Board of Trade regulations, wrought iron used in the con- 
struction of railroad bridges cannot be subjected to a greater strain 
than four tons of 2,240 lbs. in compression, and five tons net section 
in tension. When the bridge, in addition to its own weight, is loaded 
with the heaviest class of locomotives engines, which load is generally 
assumed to vary from one ton per running foot for each track on the 
longer bridges to one and one half tons on the shorter ones." 

" In testing, the general practice is to run trains of locomotives 
with their tenders, or cars of equivalent weight, at high rates of speed, 
across the bridge, first in the same direction and then in opposite di- 
rection*, when there are two tracks, as is generally the case, meeting 
in the center of the span ;" and 

"As the tensile and compressive strengths of ordinary plate, T and 
angle iron, of which the English bridges are mainly constructed, are 
respectively 20 and 16 tons gross per sectional square inch, the strains 
allowed are equivalent to one fourth of the breaking strength." 

" The term factor of safety is applied to the ratio of the ultimate 
or breaking strength to the working strain, which in the above case 
is four, hut English engineers at the present time rarely work down 
to this minimum, but more generally adopt five or one-fifth of the 
breaking strength." 

" In France the government regulations require that for wrought 
iron railroad bridges, ' no part shall be strained to exceed six kilo- 
grammes per square millimetre,' i. e., 3.81 tons gross per square inch, 
but as in tension this embraces the gross section of riveted plates, the 



32 

factor of safety is nearly the same as in England. The government 
inspectors, however, appear to rely more upon actual tests than on 
calculations of the strains when granting a certificate." 

"The first test is ma<le by applying a dead load on the bridge. 
The spans under 20 metres (G6.5), a dead load of 1.5 tons per run- 
ning foot is distributed upon each single track, and for spans exceed- 
ing 20 metres a dead load of 1 2 tons per foot. In some cases, how- 
ever, permisson is given to reduce the load to 1.05 tons per toot." 

"The second test is to run across the bridge with a train composed 
of two engines witli their tenders loaded so as to weigh each sixty 
tons, with a sufficient number of cars attached to cover one span 
loaded with 12 tons each, at a speed of 12 to 24 miles an hour." 

" The third and last test is to run a train composed of two engines 
each with its tender weighing fifty-five tons, and wagons loaded as in 
ordinary passenger trains, at a speed of from 25 to 13 miles an hour." 

" For bridges carrying two tracks the trains are made to traverse 
each line, first in the same and then in the opposite directions, so that 
the trains pass at the center." 

" The railroad bridges in both England and France, when not built 
of brick or stone arche*, are mainly constructed of wrought iron, 
which, not being subject to material depreciation in strength from 
time or continued use, no periodical inspection is made by the gov- 
ernment officers, although when their attention is called to any indi- 
cation of failure, it is their pratice, if not their duty, to examine and 
determine what ought to be done." 

LOAD ON RAILROAD 1SRIDGKS. 

The load which they have to sustain is their own weight added to 
the greatest rolling load, i. e., the weight of the locomotives and cars 
that may be brought upon them, together with such weight of snow 
as may lodge on the root's of those that are covered and on the chords 
and flooring of those not covered. The action of the wind on the 
bridge and the passing trains, has also to be provided for. 

The rolling load has kept gradually increasing since the commence- 
ment of railroads, and is now more than double what it was twenty- 
live or thirty y< ars ago. On some roads it has nearly or quite reach- 
ed the point of resistance of which common iron rails are capable, as 
is evinced by their rapid wear and frequent breakage, but the intro- 
duction of steel rails may possibly induce a still further increase of 
the load. In Europe, generally, the locomotives, cars, and the loads 
carried, are much lighter than in this country, the practice there being 



33 

to run more frequent trains both for passengers and freight. In Eng- 
land the train expenses cost less from their cheaper labor, while here 
the maintenance of the rolling stock and rails costs considerably 
more, and the proportion of useful or paying load from the great 
weight of rolling stock is considerably less. True economy perhaps 
may be found intermediate. 

The locomotives at present in use on the New Haven, Middletown 
and YVillimantic railroad are comparatively light, the business of the 
road so far being purely local, but their weight will doubtless be in- 
creased when the road is completed and through connections formed. 
It may be well therefore to inquire what are the maximum grades and 
weight of locomotives on railroads with which the Middletown road 
will eventually compete for the through business between New Haven 
and Boston. 

On the New Haven and Springfield railroad the maximum grades 
are less than 30 feet per mile. From Springfield to Boston they are 
60 feet per mile, and on the Middletown they are also 60 feet. 

Until recently the heavier class of locomotives used on the New 
Haven and Springfield railroad, including the tenders, weighed 55.43 
tons, with a length between the extreme supporting wheels of 41 feet, 
giving 1.35 tons per running foot. Recently they have introduced a 
class of 10 wheel freight engines which weigh 47.66 tons, the length 
between the extreme wheels being 43^ feet, giving 1.1 tons per foot. 
The engine alone weighs 39.4 tons, and has a bearing length of 23 
feet.'giving 1.75 tons per foot; on the driv'ng wheels the weight is 
25.64 tons on a length of 10 feet 11 inches, equal to 2.36 tons per foot. 

On the Springfield and Boston railroad the heavier class of freight 
locomotives weigh 55.4 tons on a bearing length of 42 feet, which 
gives 1.32 tons per foot, and on the driving wheels, which are gener- 
ally 7.9' from center to center, the usual load is about 3.90 tons per 
foot with two locomotives coupled, which is a common occurrence on 
both roads, the distance between the extreme wheels is from 89| to 
93 feet, giving 1.25 to 1.19 tons per running foot. 

On many railroads in the New England States there are occasional 
loads carried much in exces* of the ordinary, such as heavy machin- 
ery, stone blocks, &c, which loaded on platform cars weigh in some 
instances from 1^ to nearly 1^ tons per foot on the rails, and as there 
will undoubtedly be the same kind of loads and inducements to use 
heavy locomotives on the New Haven, Middletown and Willimantic 
railroad as on the roads referred to, the bridges should be of sufficient 
strength to carry them. ' 

5 



- 282,000 lbs 


32,400 


(i 


- 36,600 


« 


10,300 


(i 


- 15,000 


« 


783,700 


u 



34 



BRIDGE ACROSS THE CONNECTICUT. 

The following is the estimated load per foot on the spans of 206 
feet : 

Iron in trusses and bracing, - 
Iron in cross girders, - 

Timber track stringers, crossties &c, - 
Rails, chairs, splices, &c, - - - 

Snow, action of wind, &c, ... 
Rolling load 206 ft. tD 1.9 tons per foot, - 

1,160,000 lbs. 
or 580 tons, which divided by 206 gives 2.8 tons per foot. 

I am informed that the Keystone Bridge Company who built this 
bridge, based their calculations on an assumed total dead and rolling 
load of 2.8 tons per foot of which 2 tons were estimated as rolling, 
while the above estimate, after allowing for weight of bridge, snow, 
&c, makes the load only 1.9 tons per foot, which however is still 
largely in excess of any probable rolling load on the structure. 

With the assumed load of 2.8 tons per foot the end set of tie bars 
are strained to 5.01 tons per sectional square inch, the 2d and 3d sets 
to 4.86 tons, and the others from 5.1 to 2.7 tons. 

The links forming the lower chords at the middle of the span are 
subject to a tensile strain of 576 tons, to resist which there is a net 
section of 110 square inches, which makes the strain equal to 5.24 
tons per inch. 

The links in the 2d and 3d panels from the center are strained to 
about 5.22 tons per inch and the others from 5.28 to 4 tous, accord- 
ing to my measurements of their dimensions. 

The upper chords at the center are subject to a compressive strain 
equal in amount to the tension on the lower chords, and as near as 
the sections can be obtained the strains vary from 4.23 tons per inch 
at the centre, to 3 tons at the second panel from the ends, and as the 
chords are 1 2^ diameters for the length of a panel, the maximum 
strain is equal by Gordon's formula to about ^ of the breaking 
strength. 

DRAW BRIDGE. 

The draw has been proportioned for a dead and rolling load of 2.75 
tons per foot. The trusses are composed of twelve panels of 12^ feet 
on each side of the pivot, and are of the same height of those of the 
long spans. 



35 

The strains on such structures are quite complicated, changing from 
tension to compression as the bridge is closed or swung open, and can 
only be fully exhibited by diagrams. They are intended to be and are 
nearly the same per square inch at the maximum as on the long 
spans. Some eight additions have been made to the original plan of 
the Draw, and I believe it now to be well proportioned and sufficient- 
ly strong. It lacks, however, ready facilities for adjustment in event 
of getting out of order, but its plan of construction is such that 
changes of temperature ought not to effect it injuriously unless the 
sun's rays act more powerfully upon one set of chords than on the 
other. 

END SPANS. 

The trusses of the two end spans are 54 feet in length and 6| feet 
in height, with an assumed dead and rolling load of 2\ tons per foot, 
which is an excess of any probable load ; the links in the lower 
chords are strained from 5.2 to 4.6 tons per inch, and the diagonal 
ties from 4.8 to 4.3 tons. The top chords are strained about 4 or 4^ 
tons and the vertical struts about 4 tons per inch, as near as can be 
ascertained without the detailed drawings showing the precise thick- 
ness of the metal in the columns. 

CROSS GIRDERS. 

The cross girders which carry the track are rolled iron beams 15 
inches deep, with top and bottom tables 44/ inches wide and a stem 
j inches thick. The long spans and Draw have two beams to a 
panel, bolted together and suspended by four bolts of 1^ inches diam- 
eter from the link pins of the lower chords. 

They rest on a cast iron shoe 12x10^ by 2 to 3 inches thick. The 
suspension bolts are amply strong and the cast iron shoes are theo- 
retically so, but as the floor girders are subject to impulsive shocks 
from the passing loads, I would have preferred seeing them of wrought 
iron, but even if they should foil the beams would be caught by and 
rest upon the wrought iron nuts of the suspension bolts. 

The two beams can bear with safety a distributed load of about 40 
tons, and the greatest load that can come upon them is the weight 
resting on the driving wheels of the heaviest locomotives. The side 
spans have one beam to a panel of 6 feet, suspended at each end by 
two hammered bars of 1^ by }g in. which is sufficient for any proba- 
ble load. The weight on the drivers in this case will be distributed 
by the rail strings upon two beams, so that the strain upon them 
will be about the same as on the long spans. 



36 



LYMAN AND KAPALLO TRESTLE VIADUCTS. 

Both viaducts are built for a double track and on the same general 
plan. The horizontal struts being of timber in the Lyman, and of 
iron in the Rapallo. 

The bents or trestles consist of three hollow iron segment columns 
1\ inches diameter with projecting flanges of If inches. The center 
column is vertical and the side ones are inclined one foot in eight. 
The width at top from center to center of the outside columns is 17 
feet, and the outer rail of each track comes directly over them. Lon- 
gitudinally the trestles are placed 30 feet apart. 

The upper tiers of columns are 30 feet in height in the Lyman 
viaduct, and 25 feet in the Rapallo, the lower tier of each varying in 
height to conform to the inequalities of the ground. At the highest 
points there are four tiers in the former and two in the latter, all of 
them braced laterally and longitudinally at their junctions. 

The superstructure consists of three sets of iron beams two to a 
set, each of the beams being 12 inches deep and of 12^ sectional area ; 
they rest on the top of the columns and extend from trestle to trestle 
and support the timber crossties or deck beams upon which the rails 
are laid. 

Each set of beams forms the compressive member of a triangular 
truss. They are supported in the middle by a segment column "J^ 
feet long of 6 inches diameter and 6 inches sectional area, which 
column is supported from each end of the beams by two inclined bars 
of 2^ by i inch iron. The inclined bars with a load of 45 tons uni- 
formly distributed on the span of 30 feet will be strained to 53 tons 
per inch, and the beams being supported in the center each half 
length of a set will safely carry 30 tons, which is sufficient. 

The greatest load that can ever come upon the top of -any single 
trestle is that due to the weight of one span of the superstructure, and 
two locomotive engines exclusive of their tenders, one to eacli track, 
which rolling load I assume in the following calculation to weigh 90 
tons, or one and a half tons per foot of track. 

GREATEST LOAD ON THE TOP OF THE COLUMNS OF ONE TRESTLE. 

Iron in superstructure, ... 10,280 lbs. 

Rails, chairs, and spikes, - - 3,000 lbs. 

Cross-ties, guard timbers, &c, - - 16,720 lbs. 

Snow on platform, ... 1,000 lbs. 

Rolling load l£ tons per foot, - - 180,000 lbs. 



or 105i tons. 



211,000 lbs. 



37 



LYMAN VIADUCT. 

To support the above load in the Lyman viaduct there are three 
hollow iron columns containing 41 sectional square inche? of metal, 
which gives an average strain of 2.58 tons per inch. They are 45 
diameters in length, and by Gordon's formula for wrought iron pillars 
have a breaking strength of 10.74 tons per inch, so that the strain 
upon them, when loaded a,< above, is equal to the ±\ s of their ultimate 
strength. The lower ties have to support in addition the weight of 
the columns above, also the bracing. Those of the second tier from 
the top, which are of the same length and sectional area as the first, 
support (105.5 -[- 8.83) — 114.33 tons, giving a compressive strain of 
2.79 tons per inch or 3 ^ 5 of the ultimate strength. 

The columns of the third tier have a sectional area of 44 inches, 
and have to support (114.43 + 9.08) = 123.41 tons, equal to 2.8 tons 
per inch, or nearly the same as the last. 

In the fourth or lowest tier the sectional area of the columns is 50 
inches, and their height 36 feet, or 51 diameters. The load they have 
to sustain is (123.41 -(- 9.33) = 132.74 tons, giving a strain of 2.65 
tons per inch. Their breaking strength is 9.18 tons per inch, so that 
they are strained to the 5 .^ part of their ultimate strength. 

RAPALLO VIADUCT. 

In this viaduct the load and strain on the top are the same as in 
the Lyman, viz : 105^ tons load and 258 tons strain per inch, but as 
the columns are only 37^ diameters in length, their breaking strength 
is increased to 12.26 tons per inch or 4.76 times the strain. 

The load on the highest trestle of the second tier is (105^ -f-8) = 
113^ tons, to support which the three columns have a sectional area 
of 46.4 inches, giving 2.446 tons strain per inch, and as they are 33 ij 
feet or 50^ diameters in length, the breaking strength is 9.75 tons per 
inch, equal to 4 tons the strain. 

The strains given are the average on the three columns, and show 
that in the Lyman Viaduct they are from 3 |j to the 5 .| ff , and on the 
Rapallo from the \ to the ? .-f s of the breaking strength of the col- 
umns. 

The contract for the Rapallo Viaduct provides, that " The materi- 
als composing the viaduct will be so proportioned and the parts o. 
such size and shape that the weight of the structure, including the 
ties, rails, planking, guard rails, &c, which are furnished by the com- 



38 

pany, shall in no part cause a tensile strain upon any of the wrought 
iron of over 10,000 lbs. to the sectional square inch, and the com- 
pression strains, with the load* and weights aforesaid, shall not exceed 
one-fifth of the ultimate strength of the materials so under compres- 
sion." And in another clause of the contract it is specified that the 
viaduct shall be capable of carrying safely two trains of cars and 
locomotives at the highest attainable speed. 

The supi restructure or top works appear to be up tothe requirements 
of the contract, but the supporting columns fall considerably short of 
the strength specified, ami which, in my opinion, is necessary under 
all the contingent circumstances, to make perfectly safe and durable 
structures. 

In practice it is found difficult to erect tiers of columns one above 
another, connected by rigid struts, so that the pressure on every part 
of the bearing surface shall be uniform, and experiments show that a 
hollow pillar so irregularly fixed that the strain passes along its diag- 
onal, loses two-thirds of its strength, usually, therefore, such struc- 
tures are planned with a great surplus of strength. 

The late chief engineer of the work, Edward W. Serrell, Esq., 
having addressed a letter in January la~t through His Excellency the 
Governor to your Honorable Hoard on the subject of these viaducts, 
and it having been snbmitted to me I have duly considered the same. 
Mr. Serrell states that the Lyman and Rapallo viaducts were plan- 
ned by him and were intended for a double track ; that he has been 
told it is the purpose to finish the Lyman viaduct, which had been 
partly erected when he resigned, by placing a single track in the 
middle without a guard-rail or "parapet," and that to do so "will be 
eminently unsafe." In reply to these statements I will here remark 
that on both of the viaduct* the rails have, been laid for one track 
precisely as originally designed, but as we have seen that in neither 
structure is the strength up to the requirements of tlie contract, nor to 
the usual standard, it may be well to inquire whether it is practicable 
by shifting the position of the present track and using one only, the 
viaducts may not be made sufficiently strong. The guard rails are 
not as yet put in place ; they are simply pieces of timber to be bolted 
on the outer ends of the cross ties which overhang the trestles. They 
add nothing to the strength of the work, but in fact weaken it to an 
amount equal to their weight. 

Mr. Serrell in continuation makes the following remarks in relation 
to the Lyman viaduct: "I know it may be said if it is strong enough 
to carry two tracks it should be able to carry one. This does not al- 



39 

ways follow. A man may be able to carry safely and easily two pails 
of water at a time by using a neck yoke ; take away the yoke and 
put a pail on his head, he may not do so well." The only conclusion 
that can be drawn from this illustration is that the second track should 
be laid and a loaded train be put on to move parallel with and in the 
same direction as the train on the main track in order to balance it 
and make the bridge safe. This would be putting a second track to 
a new use, but the proposition is absurd. Any bridge where the 
weight can be properly distributed will be strained less in carrying 
one train of cars than in carrying two. So far as the rolling load is 
concerned in these viaducts it will be reduced one-half, and it forms 
from two-thirds to six-sevenths of the whole load which the columns 
have to support. With the two tracks laid according to the original 
design, the load coming on one span is 105^ tons, including the 
weight of the superstructure and rolling load, and of this the center 
column supports 30.4 tons and each of the side columns 37.55 tons. 

By placing a single track only in the center the load will be 52$ 
tons or one-half, and the weight on the center column 37.55 tons, and 
on each of the side ones 7.6 tons. 

The excess of weight put on the center column by this arrange- 
ment will be 7.15 tons, and the reduction on each of the side ones 
30.2 tons. 

But it is perfectly practicable by trussing the upper ends of the 
columns to distribute the weight nearly uniformly between the three, 
which will reduce the load on the top of each to 17.6 tons, and bring 
the maximum strains to about ^\ of the breaking strength of the 
material in the Lyman viaduct, and to the fa in the Rapallo. 

There is another plan by which the strain can be reduced, but not 
to the same extent as by laying a single track in the center. This is 
by placing the track exactly in the middle between the center and 
one of the side columns, when the load on each will, after deducting 
one-fourth the weight of the superstructure as being supported by the 
third column, be precisely alike, viz. 24.375 tons, with no strain what- 
ever on the third column except that due to the bracing and dead 
load. In this case the maximum strain on the two columns of the 
Lyman viaduct will be the ¥ x 5 of the breaking strength, and on the 
two of the Rapallo the -g.^-gth. 

In these statements I neglect the variable proportion of the super- 
structure borne by the columns dependent on the position of the track, 
which is however of no great account ; also of the increased strain 
on the outside columns due to their inclination, and provided for in 
he original plan by giving them one inch more sectional area. 



40 

One or other of the plans sugge sted I would think it advisable to 
adopt to place the strength of the str u c ture s beyond question. I do 
ay that they are unsafe as now completed they have still a factor 
of safety of 8.46 to 4 when in perfect adjnetment, l>ut the strains are 
greater than is considered proper to put upon the material in such 
structures. 

In the contract for both the Connecticut River bridge and the two 
viaduct it i- provided that the ultimate strength of the wrought iron 
to he oaed shall be 60,000 lbs. per sectional square inch. In my ex- 
perience vrv little of the icon used in bridge construction, except 
ban of very mall section, will stand the strain. 4$,000 lbs. is all 

that can be relied on for channel, angle, and T iron, even when -mall 
rounds and square! mad- from the same stock will stand 55,000 lbs. 
Some of the best makers of boiler plate, while claiming that their 
iron will stand 50,000 Ibfc, will only guarantee 40,0001b*. In the Ap- 
pendix will be found a Stateasent of some recent experiment- made 
apt Eads, of the St. Louis bridge, on 123 specimens of iron 
from variW makers, showing that the average strength was only 
about 50,000 lbs. per inch, the high, -t being 60,000 and the lowest 
10 lbs. The faetor of safety therefore of the river bridge, with 
-nmed load, I do not rate more than 1 cording to the 

English standard, but with the great rolling load on which the calcu- 
lation- are based the factor practically is raised, and I consider it one 
of the strongest bridges in New England. 

The plan of estimating the strength by the ratio of the breaking to 
the working strain is purely conventional, and is deceptive to those 
not -killed in the strength Of material- as applied in con-truction. 
Long before any complex system of trussing could be subject) d to a 
bad equivalent to the ultimate strength of the material it would part 
from the stretching and compression of the bars throwing unequal 

strain- on the part- a- SOOT as the limit of elasticity was exceeded. 

The true index of safety i- tins elastic limit, which for wrought iron 
uj rathe, less than one half of it- ultimate strength, and if the great- 
trojn exceeds this and is often repeated, the structure must event- 
ually fail. 

TESTING. 

In all cases with iron bridges it is desirable that they be subjected 
to a test load greater than that whirl, will come upon then in ordina- 
ry me, and more especially in structures like those under considera- 
tion composed of very many parts where the actual strength depends 



41 



largely on the fastenings and connections. Opinions mav differ as to 
what th, test load should be. I do not belief in severest! TZ h 

th ttr Dge ; aSteDingS ^ b ^ rob » bi % injure or weaken 
be t ! tU - e ; Th r r COntract for the ™ ^e provides that it may 

t Ti T: v ,oad of two tons per f °° f ' - d the ™***^ 

tr tt , are , WdllDg that th67 be t6Sted ™ th a ^ ^ 21 tons 
won Ml " he fl 7 gl \ tri f ; but " «■*** these loads excessive and 
wonldbesansfiedw.thlitonsperfoot on the river bridge and 2 
tons tor the naducts, which being of short spans have to s^ta n the 
grated load of the Motive. Such test load should I 1 
at a* great speed as will at any time occur in the use of the road. 

PAINTING. 

The proper painting of the iron work of the river bridge has been 
neglected; much of the surface is now ru.ted. In such%trucU ir es 
^composed of thin shapes such as the main struts wh^ 
only | to A niches th.ck, il is a ]l importaut that th be 
from co which h a few years tf a]Jowed J P e^ d 

natural y red„, e their strength. The columns tfthe v aducts Z 
also only about A inch thick, and require to be well protected 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES LAURIE, 

Civil Engineer. 



42 



APPENDIX, 

Gapt. Eads Experiments on the Tensile Strength of various qualities 
of Wrought Iron. 



Number 

of 

Specimens, 



Kind of Iron. 



Ultimate strength per 
square inch. 



16 
3 

5 

3 

3 

6 

5 

3 

4 

14 

33 

10 

4 

1 

8 
5 

123 



Aver 
age. 



High- 
est. 



Lowest. 



Remarks. 



Bolts 1| to If diameter, 

Bolts \\, 

Bolts in bridge braces, 

Tyrone iron, 

Bolts made from scraps, 

Lowmoor iron, 

Sable iron, 

do. 
Salisbury iron, 
T iron used in bridge, 
From different makers, 
Patterson Iron Co., 
Wagner's Extra, 
Marked U. S. iron, 
Cut from bridge links 

parallel to fibre, 
Do. perpendie'lr to fibre, 



47,400 52,600 47,000 

47,733 48,000 47,300 

148,800 

1,47,533 48,000 47,300 

44,733 48,400 40,000 

54,390 55,400 53,400 

35,100 

49,700 

47,550 50,400|47, 800 

47,400 50,40046,2(10 Bait. Bridge Co. 

51,58041,850' 

55,000 51,300 



From 8 different makers. 
Lyons, Short & Co. 
Carnegre & Co. 
Lyons, Short & Co. 



Zugg & Co., Pittsburgh. 
Do. 



56,000 
60,000 

55,070 60,050 
37,020 



51,200 



50,600 



SHEPAUG VALLEY. 

The earnings of this road for the year not being sufficient 
to meet the running expenses, it has passed into the hands of 
the bond holders, by whom it is now operated. The road was 
begun under favorable auspices ; the cost of construction and 
equipment was not extravagant, but little exceeding $25,000 
per mile, and the cost of operating has been very small, but 
the business yet developed has been exceedingly light. The 
manufacturing facilities afforded in this valley are almost en- 
tirely unimproved, and the road passing through no large 
villages, but through a section mostly devoted to farming in- 
terests, will not immediately accumulate business, which in 
such a section requires time for its development. 



43 



NEW CANAAN. 

Aii effort was made by certain citizens of Darien for the 
restoration of a depot on the line of this road in that town, 
upon which a hearing was held by the commissioners. It ap- 
pearing that the petitioners were reasonably well accommo- 
dated by the depot facilities already afforded ; that the station 
was abandoned because it did not pay the cost of stopping 
trains, and that the road, now scarcely earning the cost of 
operating, could not well afford additional expense ; the re- 
storing of the station was not approved. The company will 
readily establish a station at any place on its line where busi- 
ness can be found to maintain it. 

WATERTOWN AND WATERBURY. 

The lease of this road to the Naugatuck company contin- 
ues in force, and the operations on this road for the year are 
included in the report of that company. 

I 

ROCKVILLE. 

This road is leased to the Hartford, Providence and Fish- 
kill company, with whose returns the operations on this road 
are included. 

SOUTH MANCHESTER. 

This road is also leased to the Hartford, Providence and 
Fishkill company, and its doings are included in the report 
of that company. 

NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN. 

No additional part of this road has been completed, about 
five miles only being in operation between Danbury and 
Brookfield Junction. This has been leased to the Housa- 
tonic company since March 1st, 1872, the operations reported 
by this company being only for five months previous to that 
date. 



44 

To the foregoing are added tables of statistics compiled by 
the commissioners from the returns, together with the returns 
herewith given in full. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN I. HUTCHINSON, ) General 

SIMEON GALLUP, } Railroad 

ANDREW NORTHROP, ) Commissioners. 

Hartford, April, 1878. 



45 



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54 



TABLE X. 

Number of Passengers carried over the Railroads each year, for a 
period of twenty years, with a list of accidents. 



Year. 


No. of Passengers. 


No. of Accidents. 


Fatal. 


Not Fatal. 


1853 


2,202,490 


35 


20 


15 


1854 


2,938,698 


29 


21 


8 


1855 


2,861,419 


25 


13 


12 


1856 


2,697,501 


33 


18 


15 


1857 


3,036,838 


19 


17 


2 


1858 


2,573,516 


34 


20 


14 


1859 


2,623,991 


46 


25 


21 


1860 


2,967,440 


34 


14 


20 


1861 


2.824.556 


34 


26 


8 


1862 


2,968,071 


39 


31 


8 


1863 


3.789,583 


45 


38 


7 


1864 


4,812,513 


119 


52 


67 


1865 


5,211,231 


135 


43 


92 


1866 


5,600,065 


44 


27 


17 


1867 


6,841,451 


54 


35 


19 


1868 


8,057,922 


78 


37 


41 


1869 


6,797,462 


65 


32 


28 


1870 


8,032,638 


75 


46 


29 


1871 


9,508,819 


89 


42 


47 


1872 


10,134,633 


85 


54 


31 


Total, 


97,801,538 


1117 


611 


501 



55 



TABLE XL 

Nvmes of Railroad Commissioners, Commencement of Term, and 

Residence. 



Zacharus W. Bissell, 


Sharon, 


1853. 




Moses B. Harvey, 


Stafford, 


1853. 




John Stewart, 


Chatham, 


1853. 


resigned. 


John Gould. 


Fairfield, 


1854. 


to fill vacancy. 


Henry Hammond, - 


Killingly, 


1856. 


to fill vacancy. 


Patten Fitch, - 


Fairfield, 


1857. 




John Gould 


Fairfield, 


1858. 




George Wadhams, 


Torringtou, 


1859. 




Henry Hammond, - 


Killingly, 


1860. 




Joseph W. Dudley, 


Madison, 


1861. 


deceased. 


John J. Jacques, 


Wat ei bury, 


1862. 




Abel Scranton, 


Madison, 


1862. 


to fill vacancy. 


Samuel Fitch, 


Stafford, 


1863. 




Abel Scranton, - 


Madison, 


1864. 




Wm. A. Cummings, 


Darien, 


1865. 




Samuel Fitch, - 


Stafford, 


1866. 




Albert Austin, 


Suffield, 


1867. 




James Pike, 


Sterling, 


1868. 




Charles H. Denison, 


Stonington, 


1869. 


resigned. 


Simeon Gallup, - 


Groton, 


1870. 


to fill vacancy. 


John I. Hutchinson, 


Essex, 


1870. 




James Pike, 


Sterling, 


1871. 


resigned. 


Simeon Gallup, 


Groton, 


1872. 


to fill vacancy. 


Andrew Northrop, 


Brookfield, 


1872. 





Kailroad Beturns. 



NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN, AND HARTFORD 
RAILROAD. 

Return of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad Com- 
pany, for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $15,500,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 15,500,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 15,500,000.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 155,000.00 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 15,500,000.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - - 21,700,000.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 111,111.00 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - 13,277,764.00 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 5,122,500.00 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 1,134 

DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - - - $1,641,500.00 

*First mortgage bonds due (when?) 1873 and 1875.' 
tRate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 6.00 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) - none. 

tRate of interest (what?) per cent, - - none. 

*On this line state when the bonds became due and the amount of the same in 
the column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



68 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 

All others describe in same manner. 

2. Amount of floating debt, - none. 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 1,641,500.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 11,767.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 1,406,156.00 

COST. 

1. Total cost of entire road to date, including, 

Eeal Estate, .... $12,861,473.97 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 92,196.95 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 11,017,535.52 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, - - 1,840,972 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 13,197.00 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 1,577,041.00 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - - 139^ m. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 1 19^ m. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) in New 
York 14 miles, in Massachusetts 6 miles, - 20 m. 
f New Britain branch, 2\ m. 

a xt j i .1, n i J Middletown " 10 m. 

4. .Name and length or branches, < « ,». , , (( 

[ Hartfd freight " 

5. Total length of branches, 

6. Length of.same in Connecticut, 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, ... 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track mile>), - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - - - 



31m. 


>• 


16^ m. 


16^m. 


39 m. 


1,088 ft. 


35 m, 


, 1,025 ft, 


301 m, 


. 3,708 ft. 


257 m, 


. 3,645 ft. 


12;; m. 





NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 69 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 103 m. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - -199 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 5,617 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - 3,564 ft. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - 2,586 ft. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, ... 171 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 2 

n Q „ , . ( Housatonic Railroad. 

I J. JName ot each, j Hartfordj p rov idence and Fishkill Railroad. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, - 51 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - 41 

ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

0!) ^ . . , , ,, c" x. \ Shore Line Railway, New 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, < „ tvt i j 

° ( Haven to New London. 

23. Total length of all, ... - 50 miles. 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, - 50 miles. 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 18 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - 18 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - - 2,117 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, ... 35 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 30 

9. Average*rate of speed of accommodation trains, 28 

* Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



84 


98,115 


129 


32,119 


1,010 


16,000 


41 


28,700 


- 251 





70 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 

10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ..... 15 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - .06§c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, .... .04^c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, .02 1 *;' ff 

4. General average rates, ... .02^c. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, .53, .26§, .26§, .20, (3 miles). 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, .02f , .02|, .02f , .02$ 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - - •03 T 7 5 ^ y 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 983,147 

2. Miles run hy freight trains, ... 481,763 

3. Miles run by other trains, - - 235,981 

4. Total miles run, .... 1,700,891 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 3,925,765 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 124,919,238 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - - - 61,652,822 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - 892,579 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 38,662,529 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ..... 521,872 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE YEAH. 

1. f Extension or alteration of road, - - $1,306,220.03 

2. Land or land damages, ... 585,381.99 

* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 

f The following entries cover permanent improvements not hitherto charged. 



NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 71 

8. New braidings, .... 542,146.67 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 140,972.00 

5. Any other expenditure, ... 33,055.32 

6. Total, .--- $2,607,776.01 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, N. Y. & N. H., $96,613.57 ; H. & N. 

H., $222,707.01, ... - $319,320.58 

2. * New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), N. Y. & 

N. H., 2,600 tons, $78,000 ; H. & N. H., 

2,500 tons, $75,677.21, - - - 153,677.21 

4. Repairs of bridges, N. Y. & N. H., $18,780.50, 

H. & N. H., $4,140.06, - - 22,920.56 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, N. Y. & N. 

H., $26,236.50; H. & N. H., $80,736.27, 106,972.77 

6. Repairs of fences, N. Y & N. H., $1,893.54 ; 

H. & N. H., $4,118.04, - - - 6,011.58 

7. Removing ice and snow, H. & N. H., - 1,364.35 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - $610,267.05 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 4,446.36 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - 531,340.02 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 



1. Repairs of locomotives, N. Y. & N. H., 

912.99 ; H. & N. H., $131,600.37, - $200,513.36 

2. Repairs of machinery, N. Y. & N. H., $7,- 

064.08 ; H. & N. H., $9,338,70, - - 16,402.78 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 

N. Y & N. H., $119,547.22 ; H. & N. H., 

$45,448.36, - - - 164,995.58 

4. Repairs of freight cars, N. Y & N. H., $30,- 

011.98 ; H. & N. H., 67,513.76, - 97,525.74 



* Less old rails taken up and $151,883.82 charged to permanent improve- 
ments. 



72 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 

5. Cost of fuel,— wood, coal, N. Y. & N. H., $109,- 

839.00— $7,101.45 ; H. & N. H., $123,- 
683.42— $3,966.60 ; total, N. Y. & N. II., 
$116,940.45 ; H. & N. H., $127,750.02, - 244,590.47 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, N. Y. & N. H., 

$14,282.75; H.&N. H., $11,503.61, - 25,786.36 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 

N. Y. & N. H., $3,940.84 ; H. & N. H., 

$4,417.28, 8,358.12 



8. Total for maintenance of motive power ' 

and cars, - - - $758,172.41 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, - 5,434.93 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - 649,474.13 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, N. Y. &. N. H., 

$327,603.23 ; H. & N. H., $105,891.41, $433,494.64 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, N. Y. & N. H., $109,- 

201.07, H. & N. H., $249,613.92, - 358,814.99 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, N. Y. & N. H., $40,685.40 ; 

H. & N. H. $33,040-00, - - - 73,725.40 

4. Gratuities, switchmen, etc., N. Y. & N. H., 

$150.00 ; H. & N. H., $144.50, - 294.50 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, N. Y. & N. H., 

$9,306.75 ; H. & N. H., $15,940.21, - 25,246.96 

6. Damages for cattle killed, N. Y. & N. H., 

$260.00 ; H. & N. H., $31.00, - - 291.00 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, N. Y. 

& N. H., $392.44; H. & N. H., $3,633.54, 4,025.98 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

N. Y. & N. H., - - - - 2,683.78 

9. Taxes, N. Y. & N. H., $124,819.87 ; H. & N- 

H., $104,897.32, - - - 229,717.19 

10. Insurance, N. Y. & N. H., $4,967.22 ; H. & N. 

H., $3,454.40, .... 8,421.62 

11. Telegraph expenses, N. Y. & N. H., $1,200.00 ; 

H. & N. H., $840.00, - - - 2,040.00 



73 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 3100,000. 
Shore Line Railway, deducted from receipts 
Shore Line Division. 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 
$258,841.73. 

Harlem Railroad deducted from receipts. 
14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 
penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 
N. Y. & N. H., $57,359.00 ; H. & N. H., 
$50,265.41, $107,624.41 

15. Total miscellaneous, N. Y. & N. PL, 

$678,803.26; H. & N. H., $567,- 

757.21, - - - - 1,246,560.47 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 8,935.90 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 1,067,840.05 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, $2,614,999.93 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, - 18,028.67 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, - 2,154,426.06 

INCOME. 

1 . From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, N. Y. & N. H., $981,731.54 ; H. 
& N. H., $647,398.68, - - - $1,629,130.22 

To and from other roads, N. Y. & N. H., 

$797,552.13 ; H. & N. H., $376,462.46, 1,174,014.59 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, N. Y. & N. IL, $191,316.62 ; H. & 
N. H., $422,305.74, - - - 613,622.36 

To and from other roads, N. Y. & N. H., 

$2.38,216.12 ; H. & N. H., $574,113.52, 832,329.64 

3. TJ. S. Mails, N. Y. & N. H., $26,546.99 ; H. & 

N. H., $22,633.11, - - - 49,180.10 

* Total arnonnt of the three previous articles. 
10 



74 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 

4. Rents, wharfage and interest, N. Y. & N. H., 

$15,424.28 ; H. & N. H., $33,392.54, $48,816.82 

5. Expresses and extra baggage, N. Y. & N. H., 

$88,123.45 ; H. & N. H., $48,336.69, - 136,460.15 

6. Total income, .... $4,483,553.88 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - - 32,140.16 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - 3,840,749.12 

9. Income above operating expenses, - - 1,868,553.95 

10. Amount paid for interest, N. Y. & N. H., $63,- 

570.00 ; H. & N. H., $35,174.58, - 98,744.58 

11. Total net income, .... 1,769,809.37 

12. Number and per cent, dividends,* - - none. 

13. Amount paid in dividends,* - none 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... none. 

15. Surplus for the year, ... none* 

16. Surplus last year, ... none. 

17. Total surplus, ----- 1,377,592.38 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - - - $345,262.58 

Balance of accounts due the Company, - 409,470.45 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - - 622,859.35 
Other items, . - 

$1,377,592.38 



STATEMENT OP EACH ACCIDENT. 

October 4, 1871. The steamboat train ran over and killed Mo- 
desto Vailencost about 1^ miles north of Thompsonville. 

October 14. John Doyle, a brakeman, was caught between a car 
and locomotive tender at Windsor Locks, and fatally injured. 

November 14. The 12.15 p. m. train from New York struck and 
killed James H. Utter as he attempted to drive across the track at 
second crossing east of Westport Station. 

November 20. The 4.30 p. m. train from New Haven struck a 
man at East Bridgeport ; injuries slight. 



*For information concerning dividends and surplus, see statement made under 
New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad in the body of this report. 



75 

November 24. The 9.45 a. m. train from New Haven struck a 
man who was lying at the side of the track at West Haven grade ; 
injuries slight. 

November 24. Shore Line Express (4.30 p. m. from New Ha- 
ven), struck and killed Terrence Carroll while walking on the track 
at East Bridgeport. 

November 29. The 4.30 p. m. train from New Haven, struck 
Henry Seymour east of Naugatuck Junction grade. Slight injuries. 

December 5. Charles Hall attempted to get on 12 m. train when 
at Darien station, and fell and was slightly injured. 

December 11. A. Spencer, while walking on the track about 
(30) thirty rods north of Hartford station was struck and killed by 
the engine of the 3.30 p. m. train going south. 

December 13. Edwin Foot, a deranged inmate of Hartford In- 
sane Retreat, was struck and killed by the midnight mail train going 
north, about 400 feet north of Hartford station. 

December 30. The 4.30 p. m. train from New Haven killed a man 
who was lying on the track about 300 yards east of Fairfield station. 

January 5, 1872. Arthur Stewart of New Britain was caught by 
a freight car as it was being roped on a turnout at that station and 
had his arm cut off. 

February 13. Cady Bransfield, a deaf mute, was run over and 
killed by a freight train at New Britain. 

February 14. Henry Rolenburg and James Sullivan were run 
over and killed by a locomotive about two miles south of Hartford 
station, as they were walking on the track. 

March 12. The 4.30 p. m. train from New York, struck a man 
named Thomas Shandley, on the dyke near New Haven ; sent to 
hospital, since dead. 

March 18. A man, name unknown, jumped from 8.30 p. m. train 
from New Haven near Milford. Seriously injured. 

March 20. A boy named Phelps (14 years old), attempted 

to steal a ride on a freight train at New Haven freight depot, but fell 
off and had his leg badly crushed. 

April 12. Patrick Murphy (an old man) was struck and killed 
by the down express train, about 300 feet north of the stone bridge at 
the Shore Line junction. 



76 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 

April 26. The son of Patrick Monshaw (4 years old) stepped in 
front of the down accommodation train near Windsor station, a few 
feet in front of the engine and was slightly injured. 

May 4. Austin Parsons, while lying on the track drunk, was run 
over and killed by the evening express train, when about three-fourths 
of a mile south of Thompsonville station. 

May 7. Josephine Powers, a colored woman, was found dead 
near the railroad tracks opposite Enfield Gravel Pit. As there had 
been a drunken row near by during the night, it was supposed she 
had been murdered and the body placed where it was discovered. 
But the coroner's jury decided that she was killed while in a state of 
intoxication by one of our night trains. 

May 9. J. E. Perkins of Pittsfield, Mass., was found dead at the 
side of the track in West Bridgeport. He fell (or was supposed to 
fall) between the cars of the 8 p. m. train from New York. 

June 1. The 4.30 p. m. train from New Haven killed Captain 
Turney as he attempted to drive across the track at the first crossing 
west of Fairfield station. 

June 3. Edward Bulkley attempted to get on the engine of the 
9.20 a. m. train as it was passing under the depot at New Haven. 
He missed his hold and fell on the track and was fatally injured. 

June 22. A tramp (about 45 years of age) while lying on the 
track about one mile south of Wallingford station, was run over and 
killed by the steamboat train from New Haven. 

June 26. Godfrey Weald, a laborer in the employ of this com- 
pany, was caught between the bunters of the cars of the gravel train 
near Hartford tunnel and killed. 

July 13. Thomas Daily, an Irishman, while partly intoxicated, 
stepped in front of the 3.30 p. ra. accommodation train in the Hartford 
depot ; injuries slight. 

July 25. A brakeman named Charles Bailey fell from a night 
train from New York near Westport and was severely injured. 

July 26. R. F. Barnes, a brakeman on one of the freight trains, 
was killed by striking his head against the timbers of a bridge (2) 
two miles south of Berlin station. 

27. George W. Clason, brakeman on 12.15 p. m. freight train from 
New York was killed while walking on top of cars by striking against 
the first bridge east of Southport station. 



NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 77 



August 17. As the 8 p. m. train from New York was a short 
distance from Milford, Jacob Stanbier jumped from one of the cars 
and was killed. 

September 2. The 4.30 p. m. train from New Haven broke in 
two parts at second crossing east of Greenwich, and a passenger, 
name unknown, fell through and was seriously injured. 

September 12. John Kirby, while intoxicated, attempted to cross 
the track a few feet in front of the up express train at Berlin station, 
and was fatally injured. 

September 18. Ezekiel Rising, aged 80, who is very deaf, was 
struck and severely injured by a passenger train near Windsor Locks. 

September 26. The 7 a. m. train from New York killed an 
unknown man near Housatonic bridge. He stepped from the down 
to the up track in order to avoid the Naugatuck train, and did not 
observe the engine that struck him. 

Attest, WILLIAM D. BISHOP, President. 
Attest, J. F. S HELTON, Treasurer. 



State of New York, \ 
County of New York. j 

New York, November 19, 1872. 
Then personally appeared William D. Bishop, president, and John 
T. Shelton, treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing re- 
turn by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

E. C. ROBINSON, 

Notary Public. 



78 NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN AND HARTFORD RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, W. D. BISHOP, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Vice President, W. P. BURRALL, Hartford, Conn. 
Secretary, E. I. SANFORD, New Haven, Conn. 
Treasurer, J. T. SHELTON, New York. 
General Superintendent, E. M. REED, New Haven, Conn. 
Sup't N. T. and N. H. Division, J. T. MOODY, New York. 
Sup't Hartford Division, C. S. DAVIDSON, Hartford. 
Chief Clerk, E. C. ROBINSON, New York. 
General Ticket Agent, A. L. BRIGHAM, New York. 
General Freight Agent, G. H. FORBES, Hartford. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



W. D. Bishop, Bridgeport. 
W. G. Hunt, New York. 
G. N. Miller, New York. 
H. F. Clark, New York. 
H. C. Robinson, Hartford. 
E. C. Read, New Haven. 
C. M. Pond, Hartford. 



W. P. Burrall, Hartford. 

C. Vanderbilt, New York. 

C. W. Chapin, Springfield, Mass. 

A. R. Van Nest, New York. 

E. H. Trowbridge, New Haven. 

N. Wheeler, Bridgeport. 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL 
RAILROAD. 



Return of the Trustees for the Bondholders of the Hartford, Provi- 
dence and Fishkill Railroad Company, for the year ending Septem- 
ber 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $4,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 4,000,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 2,037,939.98 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 20,379 T1J 9 <y 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 2,037,939.98 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, ... unknown. 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 10,654 59 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - 1,599,507.59 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - unknown. 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, unknown. 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - - - $2,055,500.00 
*Fir.-t mortgage bonds due (when ?) a portion 

past due, the balance in 1876. 

fRate of interest, (what?) per cent., - - 7 per cent. 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) - none. 

fRate of interest (what?) per cent., - - none. 

*On this line state when the bonds became due and the amount of the same in 
the column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



80 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND PISHKILL RAILROAD. 



All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, including past due 

coupons, about, ... 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



none. 



100,000.00 

2,155,500.00 

17,615.33 

1,691,776.39 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



$4,201,486.39 



34,335.68 

3,297.598.71 

598,875.00 



4,894.17 
470,036.08 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



9 

10 
11 



1. Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each) in Rhode 
Island, ...-,- 

4. Name and length of branches, Dorrance street 

track, Providence, - 

5. Total length of branches, ... 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, * - 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, ... 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 
Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), ... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 
Total length of double track, - - - 



122xVW m. 
96x3-2* m. 



26xmm- 

ift> 2 «fr m - 
T7o 2 »m. 

none. 

18x^4, m. 

122xVoVm. 



96fWm. 



none. 



19. Name of each, • < 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RAILROAD. 81 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, none. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - - l^y^m- 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 11,386 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - none. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - 150 ft. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - - - - 126 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 4 

Norwich and Worcester Railroad. 
New London and Northern Railroad. 
Flartford and New Haven Railroad. 
New Haven and Northampton Railroad. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, - 52 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - 38 

ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE OR AGREEMENT. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

Rockville railroad, Vernon to Rockville, 
South Manchester railroad, Manchester to 
'South Manchester, ... 

23. Total length of all, - - - - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, includes 1 tool 

car, .... 71 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 
11 



41 


miles. 


H 


miles. 


n 


miles. 


6i 


miles. 




56 




42 



26 


88,145 


36 


32,000 


290 


15,000 


16 


20,000 



82 HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RAILROAD. 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - - 625 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, ... none. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - none. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 22 miles per hour. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 18 " " " 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, Quiduick to An- 
thony, l mile, .... 10c. 
No fare less than 10c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, average about - - - 5c. per mile. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3^c. 

4. General average rates, ... 31c. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 48, 40, 32, 24c. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, none, nona, none, 3c 

7. Lowest tariff rate of same per ton per mile for 

first, second, third, and fourth classes, 4-^, 4, 3-ffa, S-fY^c. 

8. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, 26-^, 22, 17^&, 13-ffifoc 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 322,842^ 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - - 159,536£ 

3. Miles run by other trains, includes switching, 59,063 

4. Total miles run, .... 541,442 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 1,207,771 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 16,918,265 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 2,888,644 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - - 266,912 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - f 7,483,212 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ----- 94,937 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RAILROAD. 83 



DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - none. 

2. Land or land damages, - none. 

3. New buildings, .... $10,666.00 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 52,500.00 

5. Any other expenditure, ... none. 

6. Total, .... $63,166.00 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ----- $139,414.37 

2. Re-rolled iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 

927£gf g gross tons, cost of re rolling, only, 35,075.90 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 154^ 8 5 8 ^, 

gross tons, ----- 17,873.11 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 16,857.64 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixture*, - - 24,445.63 

6. Repairs of fences, - 6,094.13 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... not ascertained. 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - $242,760.78 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,983.91 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - 190,534.43 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - $35,953.40 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... " « 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 19,441.59 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - - 42,288.01 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
heen added during the year. 



84 HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RATLROAD. 

5. Cost of fuel,— wood, coal, - - - , $127,406.39 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - - 8,046.08 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 1,913.79 



8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - - . - $235,049.26 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, - 1,920.89 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - 184,481.89 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... $80,930.48 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - - - 88,282.09 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - - included in general expense. 

4. Gratuities, - - - " " " 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, - - 1,379.00 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 530.26 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, -• 1,258.66 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, ) 1 () () ~r. O o 

" " from other causes, j 

9. Taxes, ..... 31,724.03 

10. Insurance, .... 7,829.17 

11. Telegraph expenses, - - included in general expense. 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road and stations, specifying each company, $18,528.47 

(Boston and Providence, Hartford and 
New Haven, New Haven and North- 
ampton, Naugatuck, Rockville.) 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, none. 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 29,460.62 

15. Total miscellaneous, - - 270,000.82 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 2,206.52 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 211,914.18 
1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 810,976.86 

* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RAILROAD. 



85 



2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$6,627.52 
636,507.30 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. mails, - 

4. Rents, - 

5. Expresses, - 

6. Total income, - 

7. Income per mile of road operated, 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

9. Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, - 

11. Total net income, - 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - 

13. Amount paid in dividends, ... 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... 

15. Surplus for the year, - 

16. Surplus last year, in material, stores, etc., esti- 

mated, - 

17. Total surplus, - 

18. Surplus, invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - - . 

Balance of accounts due the company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, - - . . 



$411,752.65 
89,013.27 



207,575.94 

245,464.64 

12,750.00 

17,460.32 

20,022.85' 

1,004,039.67 

8,205.28 

788,035.54 

193,062.81 

145,99.2.49 

47,070.32 

none. 

none. 

10,000.00 

47,070.52 

153,448.34 
200,518.66 

none. 

none. 

200,518.66 

none. 



Having closed our books last year December 30th, some of the foregoing 
amounts are necessarily partly estimated for the months of October, Novem- 
ber, and December, 1871. 



86 



HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND FISHKILL RAILROAD. 



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HARTFORD, PROVIDENCE AND PISHKILL RAILROAD. 87 



Attest, GEORGE M. BARTHOLOMEW, 
Attest, CALVIN DAY, . 
Aitest, FRANCIS B. COOLEY, 

Trustees for the Bondholders, H. P. and F. E. R. 



State of Connecticut 
County of Hartford. 



'} 



November 26, 1872. 
Then personally appeared G. M. Bartholomew, Calvin Day, and 
F. B. Cooley, Trustees, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their bes 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

HENRY R. SWATH, 

Notary Public. 



LIST OF TRUSTEES, H., P. & F. R. R. 

OFFICERS. 

President Board of Trustees, GEORGE M. BARTHOLOMEW, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Secretary, J. M. BELDEN, Hartford, Conn. 
Superintendent, SAMUEL NOTT, Hartford, Conn. 
Assistant Superintendent, J. T. McMANUS, Hartford, Conn. 
General Ticket Agent, LUCIUS TUTTLE, Hartford, Conn. 
General Freight Agent, A. G. TUTTLE. 

DIRECTORS. 

G. M. Bartholomew, Hartford, Calvin Day, Hartford, 
F. B. Cooley, Hartford, S. T. Olney, Providence, R. I. 

Henry Lippitt, Providence. " Elisha Dyer, Providence. 
Benjamin Tripp, City. Treas., Providence. 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD, 



Return of the New Haven and Northampton Railroad Company, for 
the year ending Sept. 30^,1872, under the act of 1872. 

- CAPITAL STOCK. 



1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, ----- 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued lor earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, . . . _ - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - - - - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, - 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



$3,000,000.00 

2,100,000.00 
2,100,000.00 

none. 



none. 

21,000 

100.00 

2,100,000.00 

1,575,000.00 

21,212.12 

1,408,060.65 

1,484,400.00 

206 



DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$1,750,000.00 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 



89 



* Fir.-t mortgage bonds due (when ?) January, 

1899, - $1,000,000.00 

t Rate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 7 per cent. 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) - none. 

fRate of interest (what ?) per cent., - - none. 

All others describe in same manner, 

Six per cent, convertible, due April, 1880, 400,000.00 

" « " " " 1882, 350,000.00 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - 221,115.92 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 1,971,115.92 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 19,910.70 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 1,321,708.17 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - 

(This item to include grading and .masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



2,552.367.75 



25,736.43 
1,606,153.99 

874,689.26 



8,000.45 
531,129.94 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



1. Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, • 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each) in Massa- 
chusetts, - - - - . - 



83.88 
51.26 



32.62 



*On this line state when the bonds became due and the amount of tbe same in 
the column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid' on the bonds next previous. 

12 



90 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 



10. 

11. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 
17. 

18. 



19. 

20. 
21. 



f Holyoke branch, 

Name and length of branches, -< Collinsville " 

( Tariffvillle " 

Total length of branches, ... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Aggregate length of sidings, ... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of track for the entire road, (single 
track miles), ... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of double track, - 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

Number of public highways crossed at grade in 
Connecticut, - - - - 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, .... 

( Hartford, Providence and Fishkill 

Name of each, < Connecticut "Western at New Har 
( " " Simsbury 

* Total number of stations on the entire road, - 

Number of same in Connecticut, - 



10.32 
14.09 
1.04 
25.45 
15.13 
18.00 
10.00 

109.33 
76.09 
none, 
none, 
none. 
1,990 ft. 
none, 
none. 

82 



at Plainville. 
tford. 

24 
14 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

Holyoke and Westfield railroad, ) 
Holyoke to Westfield, } 

23. Total length of all, .... 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, • 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, .... 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - . 



10.32 

10.32 
none. 

24 
14 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 91 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, ... - - 20 80,000 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 17 19,000 

3. Number of merchandise cars, 100 box ; 339 flat ; 

average weight, - 439 17,000 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 7 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, - - 40 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - - 480 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, 30 miles. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 28 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 28 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 12 miles. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 8c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, average about - 5c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3c. 

4. General average rates, - 3c. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 20, 15, 12, 10c. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, no contracts. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, general 

average, all classes, - - .0376 per ton per mile. 

DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 217.848 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - - 202,160 

3. Miles run by other trains, gravel, - 8,980 

4. Total miles run, .... 428,988 



92 NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 345,6*29 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 0,340,357 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 1,351,049 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - 280,436 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, <■ - 11,048,100 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, 4,540,537 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - $138,114.32 

2. Land or land damages, - 1,352.23 

3. New buildings, wharf and fixtures, - - 14,022.01 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 194,338.34 

5. Any other expenditure, machine shops, ma- 

chinery, etc., .... 45,071.94 

0. Construction Holyoke and Weslfield railroad, 173,056.55 



7. Total, ... . $507,155.39 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING TIIE YEAH. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, $101,045.62 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 2325£§£# 

tons, ----- 177,919.99 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, - - - 3,916.26 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 4,320.38 

6. Repairs of fences, - - - 2,789.87 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... 629.31 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - 112,701.44 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,038.30 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - 68,437.28 



* The amounts under this heading arc also included in tliu permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what lias 
been added during the year. 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 



93 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 



1. Repairs of locomotives, 



Repairs of machinery, 
Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, ) 
Repairs of freight cars, - - - ) 

Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, ) 

2,495 cords— $12,475.00 V Total, 

8,218 tons— 55,882.77) 
Oil used by engines and cars, 
Waste and oilier material used for cleanin 



.} 



8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, cbargeable to 

freight department, • - 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, Connecticut, $17,368.96 ; Massachusetts, 

$6,239.59 ; local, $829.42, - 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 
14. General SHlaries and office expenses, law ex- 
penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 



$13,985.05 
7,067.91 

18,122.61 
68,357.77 
11,624.71 



$119,158.05 

1,089.22 

72,358.02 



§159,663.02 



2,058.30 



24.437.97 

2,013.75 

none. 

none. 

none. 



$13,100.95 

201,273.99 

1,840.97 



94 NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 122,221.99 



1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$433,133.48 

3,961.70 

263,017.76 



INCOME. 



1. 


From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by 


Com- 






pany, .... 
To and from other roads, 


„ 


$174,496.16 
8,280.19 


2. 


From freight : 








On main road and branches owned by 


Com- 




3. 

4. 


pany, - 
To and from other roads, 
U. S. Mails, .... 
Rents, - 


- 


439,089.62 

12,483.57 

8,582.00 

2,582.50 


5. 


Expresses, .... 

Total income, - 

Income per mile of road operated, 

Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

Income above operating expenses, 

Amount paid for interest, 

Total net income, - 


- 


11,723.58 


6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 


$657,237.62 

6,011.50 

399,103.68 

224,104.14 

128,365.46 

95,738.68 


12. 
13. 
14. 


Number and per cent, dividends, 
Amount paid in dividends, 
Paid to sinking fund, 


- 


one 3 per cent. 

63,000 

none. 


15. 
16. 
17. 


Surplus for the year, 

Surplus last year, 

Total surplus, - - - 

Surplus invested as follows : 


- 


32,738.68 
154,524.72 
187,263.40 


18. 






Cash and loans, 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 


} 


27,846.50 




Materials, fuel, and stores, 




40,867.39 




Other items, paid on construction account, 
Due from Joel Hayden and oihers, 


86,185.28 
29,364.23 







•Total amount of the three previous artieles. 



NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 95 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. . 

November 11th, 1871. Down freight train ran over a boy named 
James Bryon at Plainville, who was trying to get on the cars ; had 
just been warned by the switchman to keep off. 

February 6th, 1872. John Gilmore, colored, was found dead be- 
side the track below Plainville, with indications of having been struck 
by an engine ; had often been seen drunk and sent away. 

April 27th. The engine of freight train up struck one of two 
wagons (whose drivers were racing) at Avon Station, killing Henry 
Cleveland and somewhat injuring Daniel Merril, both of New Hart- 
ford ; and the horses were killed. 

September 28th. Nellie E. Russell, six years old, playing on the 
track near Canal street, New Haven, was struck by engine of express 
train down. Killed. 



Attest, JOSEPH E. SHEFFIELD, President. 
Attest, S. D. PARDEE, Treasurer. 

State of Connecticut, ) 
County of New Haven, j 

December 21, 1872. 
Then personally appeared James E. Sheffield President, and S. D. 
Pardee, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing return 
by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best knowl- 
edge and belief. Before me, 

GEORGE A. BUTLER, 

Notary Public. 



96 NEW HAVEN AND NORTHAMPTON RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, JOSEPH E. SHEFFIELD, New Haven, Conn. 
Vice President, CHARLES N. YEAMANS, New Haven, Conn. 
Secretary, EDWARD A. RAY, New Haven, Conn. 
Treasurer, STEPHEN D. PARDEE, New Haven, Conn. 
Superintendent, CHARLES N. YEAMANS, New Haven, Conn. 
General Ticket Agent EDWARD A. RAY, New Haven, Conn. 
General Freight AgL, MARTIN C. PARKER, New Haven, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Jos. E. Sheffield, New Haven, And. L. Kidston, New Haven, 

Stephen D. Pardee, New Haven. Matthew G. Elliott, New 
Harmanus M. Welch, New Ha- Haven, 

ven, Wm. Walter Phelfs, New 
Chas. N. Yeamans, New Haven, York (26 Exhange Place), 

George St. John Sheffield, Geo. J. Brush, New Haven. 

New York (33 Wall street.) 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



Return of the Norwich and Worcester Railroad Company, for the 
year ending Sept. '30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 



1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, ..... 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, .... 

10. Amount of Capital Stocky issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, f, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, preferred, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



2,825,000.00 

2,825,000.00 
2,364,400.00 

none. 



none. 

24,234 

100.00 

2,423,400.00 

122.00 

40,797.92 

1,615,600.00 

6,527 shares. 

93 



DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, 
13 



$759,000.00 



98 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



* Fir.-t mortgage bonds due (when ?) to Massa- 
chusetts, July 1, 77, - - 400,000.00 

fRate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - - 6 per cent. 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when?) July 1, 

"74, 7 percent., - - - 59,000.00 

fRate of interest (what ?) per cent., payable July 

], 74, 7 per cent., ... - 150,000.00 
All others describe in same manner, 

No. 2, unclaimed dividend, - - 3,209.00 

Interest accrued not due, - - 11,170.98 

Balance due individuals, - - 25.00 

New London Northern waiting settlement, 19,817.00 

P. O. department, - - - 1,304,29 

$35,526.27 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - 35,526.27 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 794,526.27 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 13,375.86 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 529,684.18 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, .stations,' engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



2,463,982.64 



41,481.19 

1,642,655.09 

149,711.57 



2,520.39 
99,807.71 



CHAKACTKRISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, 



59.4 



*On this line state when the bonds became due and the amount of the same in 
the column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 99 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 42 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each) in Massa- 
chusetts, .... - 17.04 

4. Name and length of branches, Allyn's Point, 7.00 

5. Total length of branches, ... 7.00 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 7.00 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 13.01 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 9.01 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track mile>), - - - 66.04 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 49.00 

11. Total length of double track, - none. 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - - 1.05 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 2,800 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - 105 ft. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - 371ft. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, ... - 39 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 2 

19. Name of each, - Boston, Hartford and Erie ; Hartford, 

Providence and Fishkill. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, - 23 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - 15 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COJIPANT UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total length of all, - - - - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - j 



Y none. 



♦Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



100 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



MOTIVE PO"WER AND CARS. 



No. Weight in lbs. 



1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel aud other cars, 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - 



20 


83,580 


15 


33,150 


G42 


15,810 


6 


31,500 




none. 



391 

30 miles. 

28 miles. 

22 to 25 miles. 

15 to 17 miles. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 



1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 

4. General average rates, - - - 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 24, 20, 20, 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, general 
average, all classes, - 



;>c. 



5c. 
4 c. 



no contracts. 



ic. 



DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Miles run by passenger trains, 

2. Miles run by freight trains, 

3. Miles run by other trains, 

4. Total miles run, 



166,900 

238,916 

4,273 

410.089 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



101 



5. Number of passengers carried, - - 372,841 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 6,986,518 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - - - 2,096,330 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, ... 346,367 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 13,270,243 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ..... 5,538,380 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, - - - 

3. New buildings, - - 

4. New rolling stock, ... 

5. Any other expenditure, machine shops, ma- 

chinery, etc., .... 

6. Total, 



nothing 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $59,511.46 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - 7,807.00 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, and new, - - 10,386.77 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 8,754.33 

6. Repairs of fences, and tool houses - - 700.43 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... 115.64 

8. Total for maintenance of way, - 87,275.63 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,314.39 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, \ - - 58,183.75 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



102 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, ... $20,820.02 

New locomotive, ... 13,564. -16 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... 6,847.01 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 8,642.87 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - - 34,829.89 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, for all purposes, total, 

wood, $19,187.92 ; coal, $47,095.64, - 66,283.56 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, and for all other 

purposes, ----- 4,263.34 

7. Waste and oiher material used for cleaning, 1,363.59 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, including fuel, oil and waste, $155,914.74 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 66.4, 2,348.11 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - 103,943.16 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - 

2. Salaries, wages, aud incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - - 

3. "Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, $36,498.02, 

10. Insurance, $3,900.00, 

11. Telegraph expenses, - - - - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road specifying each company, New Lon- 
don Northern railroad, - - 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 



38,539.10 
94,867.18 
10,525.03 

5,049.57 

40,398.02 
none. 

26,692.50 
nothing paid. 

19,011.97 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. " 103 

15. Total miscellaneous, - - $235,083.37 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 3,540.41 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 156,722.24 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 478,273.74 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, - $7,202.91 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, - "* 318,849.16 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, ----- $166,836.71 
To and from other roads, - - 72,893.82 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, ----- 261,378.91 
To and from other roads, - - 236,117.93 

3. U. S. mails, ----- 5,342.50 

4. Rents, - 825.83 

5. Expresses, ----- 28,206.55 

6. Total income, - - - 771,602.25 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - - 11,620.51 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - 514,401.50 

9. Income above operating expenses, - - 293,328.51 

10. Amount paid for interest, - - - 47,670.35 

11. Total net income, - 245,658.16 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - - two of 5 per cent. 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - 237,780.00 

14. Paid to sinking fund, - - - 10,000.00 

15. Surplus for the year, - - - - 63,545.09 

16. Surplus last year, - - - 668,402.15 

17. Total surplus, ----- 731,947.24 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - - - 61,880.97 

Balance of accounts due the company, - 47,297,51 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - - 54,239.06 

Other items, iron and ties., - - - 30,467.08 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



104 NORWICn AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OP EACH ACCIDENT. 

January 3, 1872. Mary Rogers, aged about 56 years, in attempt- 
ing to cross track at Wilson ville in front of train No. 10, was struck 
by locomotive and so severely injured that she died after a few days. 

April 3. James H. Forbush, aged 28 years, was run over at foot 
of Rose Alley, Norwich. He was apparently sitting or reclining on 
the track when train No. 5 from New London, ran over him causing 
fatal injury. 

July 10. Henry S. Graver, agent at North Gro>vernordale, 
slipped when getting off a freight car near the station, train being in 
motion, fell, and the cars passed over him. He died at night. 

September 20. Frank Cutz, a brakeman, fell from a car and had 
his left leg run over, at Putnam. The limb was amputated. 

Attest, A. F. SMITH, President. 
Attest, G. L. PERKINS, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, > 
County op New London. | 

Norwich, December 18, 1872. 
Then personally appeared A. F. Smith, president, and G. F. 
Perkins, treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing re- 
turn by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

GEORGE C. RIPLEY, 

Notary Public. 



NORWICH AND WORCESTER RAILROAD. 



105 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, ALBA F. SMITH, Norwich. 
Secretary, EDWARD T. CLAPP, Norwich. 
Treasurer, GEORGE L. PERKINS, Norwich. 
Superintendent, P. St. M. ANDREWS, Norwich. 
General Ticket Agent, EDWARD T. CLAPP, Norwich. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



A. F. Smith, Norwich. 
F. H. Dewey, Worcester. 
Chas. W. Smith, Worcester. 
R. Bayard, New York. 

B. F. Stevens, Boston. 



J. F. Slater, Norwich. 
George W. Gill, Worcester. 
E. L. Davis, Worcester. 
W. F. Weld, Boston. 



14 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD, 



Return of the New London Northern Railroad Company, for the 
year ending September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $2,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 1,418,800.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 1,418,800.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 14,188 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 1,418,800.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - - 1,631,320.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 14,188.00 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - 794,528.00 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 952,100.00 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 178 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$376,500.00 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 107 

* First mortgage bonds due (when ?) Septem- 
ber, 1885, .... $300,000.00 
t Rate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 6 per cent. 
*Second mortgage bonds due (when?) July 1, 

1892, 76,500.00 

fRateof interest (what?) percent, - - 7 per cent. 
All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - 45,000.00 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 421,500.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 4,215.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 236,040 00 

t COST. 

1. Total cost of entire road to date, - 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - » 100 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 56 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each) in Massa- 
chusetts, ----- 44 miles. 

*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 

tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 

| These items cannot be given without reference to the book of the New Lon- 
don, Willimantic and Palmer railroad corporation, the original builders of the 
road from New London to Palmer, winch are not in possession of this company. 
The entire cost of the road and equipment to this company as appears by the con- 
struction account is $1,533,930.78. 



108 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 

18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 



Name and length of branches, 

Total length of branches, 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Aggregate length of sidings, - 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of track for the entire road, (single 
track miles), .... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length .of double track, - 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

Number of public highways crossed at grade in 
Connecticut, - 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, - - - 

Name of each, - - Hartford, Providence and 

* Total number of stations on the entire road, - 

Number of same in Connecticut, - 



none, 
none, 
none. 
10.31 
8.26 

100 
56 
none, 
none, 
none. 
9,151 ft. 
none. 
30 ft. 

71 

1 

Fishkill. 

37 

23 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, "Ware River 

Railroad, from Palmer to Gilbertville, Mass., 

23. Total length of all, .... 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



15.05 
15.05 
none. 

4.00 
none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 



No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 20 56,000 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 15 24,000 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 247 15,000 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 9 20,000 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, - - 82 



* Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 109 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gnged in construction, - - 250 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, 30 miles. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 24 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 20 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 12 miles. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 



1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 5c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 



three miles, - 3 



e. 



3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 2^c. 

4. General average rates, ... 3 C> 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 26^, 23£, 20, 16| 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 6^, 5^, 4-j^, 3^ 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 9, 8, 7, 5£ 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 204,129 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - - 185,814 

3. Miles run by other trains, - - 10,037 

4. Total miles run, ... - 399,980 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 342,422 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 5,113,297 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 1,970,325 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - 199,706 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 9,363,558 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ----- 



110 NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



* 



EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - none. 

2. Land or land damages, - - - $3,600.00 

3. New buildings, - ... none. 

4. New rolling stock, ... none. 

5. Any other expenditure, ... none. 

6. Total, .... $3,600.00 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new ) 

rails, (■ $134,552.83 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - ) 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 9,952.64 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 9,750.55 

6. Repairs of fences, "... 1,598.58 

7. Removing ice and snow, and other expenses, - - 1,156.44 

8. Total for maintenance of way, - 156,971.04 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,245.80 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - 67,764.80 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - - - $38,409.17 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... 4,163.02 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 10,760.33 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - - 39,243.62 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, total, - - 72,992.46 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - - - ) 554455 
7 Waste and other material used for cleaning, ) 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



Ill 



8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 171,113.15 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 1,489.45 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - 83,409.20 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - j> 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - | 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, i 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, including loss by fire, 

11. Telegraph expenses, .... 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 
14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 
penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



'32,600.13 

54,570.89 

7,852.09 

2,731.63 



17,354.33 

• 7,602.85 

none. 

none. 

none. 



$16,621.27 

139,334.19 

1,210.64 



$467,418.38 

• 3,945.89 

211,970.02 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



112 NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 

1 . From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- \ 

pany, - - - - -I 215,312.93 

To and from other roads, - - ) 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Cora- \ 

pany, - - - - -I 295,493.04 
To and from other roads, - -J 

3. U. S. Mails, 8,379.16 

4. Rents, - - ... 21,366.42 

5. Expresses, .... 7,563.88 

6. All other sources, .... 92,067.31 



7. Total income, .... $640,182.74 

8. Income per mile of road operated, - - 5,546.60 

9. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - 310,609.60 

10. Income above operating expenses, - - 172,764.36 

11. Amount paid for interest, - - 33,631.74 

12. Total' net income, - 139,122.62 

13. Number and per cent, dividends, - \ 

14. Amount paid in dividends, - - - > * see below. 

15. Paid to sinking fund, ) 

16. Surplus for the year, - - - ) 

17. Surplus last year, - - >- none. 

18. Total surplus, - -) 

19. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 

Materials, fuel, and stores, 

Other items, .... 

*On the 1st of December, 1871, the road passed under the management of J. 
Gregory Smith, Worthington C. Smith, and Benjamin P. Cheney, certain of the 
trustees of the Vermont Central Railroad, by a contract made with them by this 
company, and since then it has been operated by them in connection with that 
road, so that the above returns for ten months are made from their books ; for two 
months from books of this company. On the 30th of December, 1871, this com- 
pany declared a dividend of four per cent, from the earnings of the six months 
previous to that date, and since have paid two dividends of five per cent, each 
from receipts from the above parties for the use of the road under said contract. 
Amount paid in dividends $186,876. 



NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



113 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

June 19, 1872. Frederick Lincoln, a brakeman on a freight train, 
was struck by the highway bridge at Norwich while the train was 
passing under it, and seriously injured, but not fatally. 

June 29, 1872. Frederick Schufeldt, section man, was hit by a 
piece of iron on a passing train and fatally injured. 

Attest, A. N. RAMS DELL, President. 
Attest, ROBERT COIT, Jr., Treasurer. 



State op Connecticut, 
County of New London 



4 



New London, December 4, 1872. 
Then personally appeared A. N. Ramsdell, President, and Robert 
Coit, Jr., Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing return 
by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best knowl- 
edge and belief. Before me, 

JNO. P. C. MATHER, 

Justice of the Peace. 



15 



114 NEW LONDON NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 

President, A. N. RAMSDELL, New London. 
Secretary, ROBERT COIT, Jr., New London. 
Treasurer, ROBERT COIT, Jr., New London. 
Superintendent, GEORGE A. MERRILL, New London. 
General Ticket Agent, C. F. SPAULDING, New London. 
General Freight Agt., C. F. SPAULDING, New London. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

A. N. Ramsdell, New London. Chas. F. Davenport, New York 
Henry P. Haven, New London. Wm. W. Billings, New London. 
W.n. H. Barns, New London. Benj. Stark, New London. 
Aug. Brandegee, New London. Robt. Coit, Jr., New London. 
Charles Osgood, Norwich. Wm. H. Hill, Boston. 

Wm. Allen Butler, New York. 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 



Return of the Housatonic Railroad Company, for the year ending 
Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 



1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - - - - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



$2,000,000.00 

2,000,000.00 
2,000,000.00 

none. 



none. 

20,000 

100.00 

2,000,000.00 

1,062,000.00 

27,027.02 
2,000,000.00 
0.00 
403 



DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$400,000.00 



116 HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 

* First mortgage bonds clue (when ?) in 1877, $200,000.00 
tRate of interest, (what?) per cent., - - 7 per cent. 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when?) in 1885, 100,000.00 
t Rate of interest (what ?) per cent., - 7 per cent. 

All others describe in same manner, 1889, 6 per cent., 100,000.00 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - •- 335,212.67 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 735,212.67 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 9,935.30 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

COST. 

1 . Total cost of entire road to date, - - $1,86-1,871.19 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 25,200.00 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, . - - 340,687.38 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 4,603.88 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - - 74 imlcs. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), - see leased roads. 

4. Name and length of branches, - - none - 

5. Total length of branches, - - - none - 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - ■ none * 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - - - ' miles. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - all in Connecticut; 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), - 74 miles . 



■ *On this line stuie when the bonds became doe, and the amount of the same 
'"toVtii'is'lili'e give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 117 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, - - all jn Connecticut. 

11. Total length of double track, - none. 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - - none. 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 874 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - none. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - 250 ft. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, .... 88 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, ----- 3 

)New York and New Haven Railroad. 
Shepaug Valley Railroad. 
Connecticut Western Railroad. 

20. * Total number of stations on the road, - 20 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - all in Connecticut. 

ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, - 

Berkshire Railroad, - 22 o^ miles. 

Stockbridge and Pittsfield Railroad, - 23 1 3 °ff miles. 

West Stockbridge Railroad, - - 3 miles. 

New York, Housatonic and Northern Railroad, 39^°^ miles. 

23. Total length of all, ... - 88^ miles. 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, - 39 ^% miles. 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, ... - 37 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - 20 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, - - - - - 16 800,000 

2. Number of passenger cars, average'weight, 16 512,000 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 166 2,132,000 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 8 192,000 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, - - 223 2,676,000 

*Does not include stations on roads that arc leased. 



118 HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, - 46.3 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - - no express trains. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - none. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 25 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ----- 15 miles. 



FAKES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 5c 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, - ^ c- 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3c. 

4. General average rates, - ^ C- 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - $1.00, 75c, 65c, 50c 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, 4c, 2^c, 2^c, lc 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 13c, 10c, G^c, fc. 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 126,028 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - 131,394 

3. Miles run by other trains, - 17,537 

4. Total miles run, - 274,960 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - •262,741 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 7,071,534 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - L,97o,414 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - 215 930 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 1,682,240 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, 160,213 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 119 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - $29,500.00 

2. Land or land damages, ... 

3. New buildings, .... 12,000.00 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 86,000.00 

5. Any other expenditure, ... 22,500.00 

p. Total, ..... $150,000.00 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new I 

rails, - - - - - j 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - } mo j 9 i qq 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - 5,224.51 

6. Repairs of fences, - - - - in No. 1,2,3. 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... nothing. 

8. Total for maintenance ol way, - 103,3-18.57 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, - 1,396.60 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, -. - - $24,902.45 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... 3,654.43 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 9,284.53 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - - 30,178.44 

5. Cost of fuel, wood and coal, - - 39,925.64 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - - - 4,754.23 

7. Waste and other materials used for cleaning, 1,879.95 

8 Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 114,581.67 

* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this .article only showing what 
has been added during the year. 



120 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 



9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$1,548.40 
all in Connecticut. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



> 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals,' chargeable to I 

freight department, - - -I 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons., 
G. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, - 

9. Taxes, -_•_-- 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 
Stockbridge and Pittsfield, 
Berkshire Railroad company, 
West Stockbridge railroad, 
New York, Housatonic and Northern 
Railway, - 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

1 6. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - all in 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 



$25,403.57 



60,392.23 



2,612.66 



3,148.52 
1,641.29 

none. 



31,409.00 

42,000.00 

697.57 

3,010.06 

none. 



22,340.61 

192,655.51 

2,603.45 

Connecticut. 

410,585.75 

5,548.45 



Total amount of the three previous articles. 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 121 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 



I 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, .... 18,982.42 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, .... ^. 360,351.74 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. mails, - 6,752.58 

4. Rents, ...-- 1.982.25 

5. Expresses, ----- 10,046.33 

6. Total income, - - - 528,115.32 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - - 7,136.69 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

9. Income above operating expenses, - - 117,529,57 

10. Amount paid for interest, - - - 32,679.22 

11. Total net income, ... - 84,850.35 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, one of 5 and one of 4 per cent. 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - 106,200.00 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... 1,545.33 

15. Surplus for the year, ... - none. 

16. Surplus last year, ... 65,597.58 

17. Total surplus, ----- 44,247.93 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, ... 15,460.21 

Balance of accounts due the company, - 5,920.01 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - - 13,900.40 

Other items, - 8,967.31 



16 



122 HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

April 1, 1872. E. Nichols had his arm broken at New Milford, 
Conn. Engine struck him. 

Attest, VV. H. BARNUM, President. 
Attest, C. K. AVERILL, Treasurer. 



District of Columbia, ) 
County of Washington. } 

December 6, 1872. 
Then personally appeared W. H. Barnum, President, and made 
oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and correct, 
according to his best knowledge and belief. Before me, 



EDWARD F. BROWN, 

Notary Fublic. 



State of Connecticut,) 

V CO 

Fairfield County. ) ' 

Bridgeport, Dec. 6, 1872. 
Then personally appeared C. K. Averill, Treasurer, and made 
oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and correct, 
according to his best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

W. A. PARROTT, 

Notary Public. 



HOUSATONIC RAILROAD. 123 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, Hon. WILLIAM H. BARNUM, Lime Rock, Conn. 
Vice President, D. S. DRAPER, New York. 
Secretary, CHARLES K. AVERILL, Bridgeport. 
Treasurer, CHARLES K. AVERILL, Bridgeport. 
Superintendent, H. W. FRANKLIN, Canaan. 
General Ticket Agent, H. D. AVERILL, Bridgeport. 
General Freight Agent, H. C. COGSWELL, Bridgeport. 

DIRECTOR6. 

Hon. W,m. H. Barnum, Lime D. S. Draper, New York. 

Rock, Conn. Horace Nicfiols, Bridgeport. 

W. D. Bishop, Bridgeport. Henry S. Leavitt, New York. 

Charles A. Peck, New York. Samuel Willetts, New York. 

A. B. Mygate, New Milford. George W. Peet, Falls Village. 



NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 



Return of the Naugatuck Railroad Company, for the year ending 
September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $2,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- none. 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 1,877,900.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - 142,700.00 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shai - es of Stock issued, - 18,779 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 1,877,900.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - 2,159,585.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 32,945-j^ 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, ■ - 1,282,900 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 300 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$107,000.00 



NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 



125 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?) July 10, 1876. 

fRate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - - 7 per cent. 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) none. 

fRate of interest (what ?) per cent. - - none. 

All others describe in same manner, none. 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - 30,000.00 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 137,000.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 2,403.50 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



$1,817,165.20 



31,894.13 

all. 

223,486.57 



3,920.82 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



1 . Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) 

4. Name and length of branches, 

5. Total length of branches, - 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 



61^ miles, 
all. 



none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 
4^ miles. 



all. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 
♦On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



126 NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), .... fill miles. 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

11. Total length of double track, New York and 

New Haven, used by us, - - - 5 miles. 

1 2 Length of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - - 2o 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 3,310 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - none. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - none. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, ... 53 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 1 

19. Name of each, - New Haven and Derby. 
2'1. * Total number of stations on the entire road, - 19 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, Watertown and Waterbury. 

23. Total length of all, - - * - 4£ miles. 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, - all. 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, .... 2 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - all. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CAKS. 



1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 



•Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



No. Weight in lbs. 


12 


90,000 


14 


36,000 


272 


16,000 


4 


22,000 


- none. 





NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 127 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en 

gaged in construction, - - 220 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - - 25 miles an hour. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 22^^ miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 20 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - . . 15 m iles. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - f>c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... 4tVo-c- 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, ^f^c. 

4. General average rates, ... 3t 6 <5 8 ?t c - 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, 20, 17^, 15-^, 13-^, 9 m. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, ^t 6 o 6 (J 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 8 T %%, 7^, 6-^%, 5^ 

DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 106,814 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - 123,188 

3. Miles run by other trains, - - 19,000 

4. Total miles run, - 249,002 

5. Number of passengers carried, ' - - 329,882 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 5,480,933 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 1,805,365 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - - 193,300 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 4,594,092 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, - - - - - 18,527 



128 NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 

•expenditures charged to cost of road and equipment 
during the year. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - none. 

2. Land or land damages, ... none. 

3. New buildings, - ... none. 

4. New rolling stock, ... 

(See 3 and 4 under cost of maintenance of 
motive power and cars.) 

5. Any other expenditure, ... none. 

6. Total, .... 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildinys. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, - -' - - - $57,656.53 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 500 tons, 57,5.52.79 

4. Repairs of bridges, .... 4,065.79 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 7,814.60 

6. Repairs of fences, ... 1,701.17 

7. Removing ice and snow, - - in No. 1. 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - 128,790.88 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,951.37 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, ... $9,568.92 

2. Repairs of machinery, in No. 1. 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 13,494.29 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... 20,502.79 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, total, - - 36,372.50 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - - - 2,187.17 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 1,363.00 

* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 

road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year 



NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 



129 



8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 83,488.67 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 1,260.43 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, * 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - , 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, .... S ee 10 

10. Insurance, - - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - - - - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 
New York and New Haven Railroad Com- 
pany, in 1 and 2 under income, 
14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 
penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



26,359.77 
75,370.64 

in 1 and 2 

none. 

none. 

none. 
1,295.53 

none. 

under income. 

1,636 93 

none. 

none. 



17,727.18 



29,101.24 

133,764.11 

20,269.15 

all. 

$346,043.66 

5,243.08 
all. 



Total amount of the three previous articles. 
17 



130 



NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 



1 . From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. Ma*, 

4. Rents, and other sources, ... 

5. Expresses, - 

6. Total income, .... 

7. Income per mile of road operated, 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

9. Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, 7,447.93 ; taxes, 

$9,607.32, .... 

11. Total net income, 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - 

13. Amount paid in dividends, 

14. Paid to sinking fund, 

15. Surplus for the year, 

16. Surplus last year, to September 30, 1871, 

17. Total surplus, - - 



),459.64 
in item above. 



352,921.30 

in item above. 

5,306.61 

5,452.04 

10,500.00 

574,639.59 

8,706.66 

all. 

228,595.9:3 

17,055.25 

211,540.68 

two each of 5 per cent. 

187,540.00 

none. 

24,000.68 

202,(150.97 

226,951.65 



18. Surplus invested as follows : 
Cash and loans, 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, 



$23,912.13 
43,002.79 
78,876.92 
81,159.81 



P. S. The business for the last three months of 1871 is estimated. 



NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 131 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

March 16, 1872. At Waterbury, Martin Scully of Union City, in 
a state of intoxication, attempted to get on a train while in motion. 
Was run over ; died 18th. 

June 12th. At Union City, Wm. McMahou got on the forward 
part of a freight train. It is supposed that in attempting to go over 
the train he was knocked off by coming in contact with a bridge ; 
found dead. 

August 16. At Bridgeport, Michael Tracey, employee, caught 
between hunters ; fatally injured. 

June 22. Levi Benson, lying on the track near Derby, was run 
over and killed. Supposed to be intoxicated. 

Attest, E. F. BISHOP, President. 
Attest, H. NICHOLS, Treasurer. 



T ' 1 

iLD. ) 



State of Connecticut, 
County of Faikfiei 

Bridgeport, Dec. 30, 1872. 
Then personally appeared E. F. Bi.-hop President, and II. Nichols, 
Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing return by them 
subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best knowledge and 
belief. Before me, 

GEORGE W. BEACH, 

Notary Public. 



182 NAUGATUCK RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, E. F. BISHOP, Bridgeport. 
Vice President, None. 
Secretary, H. NICHOLS, Bridgeport. 
Treasurer, H. NICHOLS, Bridgeport. 
Superintendent, G. W. BEACH, Waterbury. 
Assistant Superintendent, None. 
General Ticket Agent, None. 
General Freight Agent, None. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

W. D. Bishop, Bridgeport. R. Tomlinson, Bridgeport. 
E. F. Bishop, Bridgeport. Green Kendrick, Waterbury. 

A. L. Dennis, Newark, N. J. N. A. Baldwin, Mil ford, Ct. 
J. B. Robertson, New Haven. J. G. Wetmore, Winsted. 
R. M. Bassett, Derby. 



NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON 
RAILROAD. 

Return of the New York, Providence and Boston Railroad Com- 
pany, for the year ending Sept. SOth, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings Which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, ... - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



$2,000,000.00 

2,000,000.00 
1,887,400.00 

none. 



none. 

18,874 

100.00 

1,887,400.00 

2,359,250.00 

30,183.40 

513,117.80 

can not tell. 

can not tell. 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



1,214,000.00 



134 NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 

* First mortgage bonds due (when?) 

f Rate of intt-rest, (what ?) per cent, - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when?) • - 
t Rate of iutere-t (what?) percent., 

All others describe in same manner, 

6 per cent, bonds due 1873, - - $55,000.00 

6 per cent, bonds due 1878, - - % ,7,000.00 

7 per cent, bonds due 1899, - - 732,000.00 
7 per cent, improvement bonds, 1876, - 100,000.00 
Extension road bonds, 1878, G per cent., 

$200,000; extension road bonds 1881,6 

per cent., $50,000; total, - - 250,000.00 

2. Amount of floating debt, ... none. 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 1,214,000.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 19,424.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - 330,208.00 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



$1,876,357.09 



30,021.72 
510,369.24 
346,006.21 



5,536.09 
94,113.53 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, 



62£ miles. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 
t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 135 



2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), Rhode 
Island, - 45, and 19^ miles 

4. Name and length of branches, 

5. Total length of branches, ... 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 

7. Aggregate length of sidings. ... 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, .... 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 
19. Name of each, ... - 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

21. Numberof same in Connecticut, 



17 miles. 



of double track. 


none. 


none, 


none. 


about 6 miles, 


about 3^ miles, 


82£ miles. 


17 miles. 


191 miles, 


none. 


none. 


2,900 ft. 


noue. 


350 ft. 



15 

none. 

none. 

20 

6 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, - 

23. Total length of all, .... 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, ... - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



none, 
none, 
tone. 

none, 
none. 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



21 


32,000 


91 


16,000 


7 


24,600 


16 





136 NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 

MOTIVE POWKR AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engine?, average weight with tender 

full, - - - - - 20 about 56,000 

2. * Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, ... 490 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - 35 miles. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - 30 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 25 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ----- 25 miles. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 3c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, .... 3c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 2^gc. 

4. General average rates, ... 2-^0*. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, no third or 

fourth classes, ... 67fc., 58Jc, none. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, none. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 67|c, 58^-c. 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, estimated, 275,929, no separate ac 

2. Miles run by freight trains, estimated, 165,556, no separate ac. 

* Also proportion of 13 passenger cars and 7 baggage cars. 



NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 



137 



3. Miles run bv other trains, 



no separate account. 



4. Total miles run, - 411,485 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 614.211 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 15,354.275 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - 8,713,834 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - 229,677 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 855,700 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, - - - - - 585,430 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQCIPMKNT 
DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, 

3. New buildings, 

4. New rolling stock, 

5. ^A.ny other expenditure, 

6. Total, 



$251,306.82 

9,000.00 

none. 

44,056.48 

none. 

$304,36 5.30 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE TEAR. 



Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 



1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, - 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, 

6. Repairs offences, - 

7. Removing ice and .snow, 

8. Total for maintenance ol way, 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



131,968.39 

included in Ko. 1. 

none. 

7,32 1 .47 

6,602.66 

in No. 1. 

in No. 1. 

145,-- 92.48 

2,334.28 

39,682.76 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what 
has been added during the year. 
18 



138 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 



1. Repairs of locomotives, - 

2. Repairs of machinery, - 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... 

5. Cost of fuel, wood and coal, mostly coal, - 

6. Oil, ------ 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$2G,092.G1 

42,503.64 

55,462.65 
6.785.58 
2,109.94 

132,954.42 

2,127.27 

37,227.22 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watc'imen, - 

4. Gratuities, - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, ..... 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, ... 

12. Ferry, - 

13. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

14. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 

15. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 



$124,263.87 

included in 
No. 1. 



561.65 

22,137.24 

2,546.45 

none. 

23,644.40 

nothing. 

nothing. 

33,044.66 



NEW YORK PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 139 

16. Total miscellaneous, - - $206 203.27 

17. Amount per mile of road operated, 3,283.25 

18. Proportion for Connecticut, - 55,815.25 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 485,050.17 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, - 7,760.80 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, - 131,933.60 

INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 

P anv ' ----- $208,744.81 

To and from other roads, - - 237 146 31 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 

P ar, y> - - - - 126,087.70 

To and from other roads, - - 216 451.55 

3. U. S. mails, 7,968.76 

4 - Rent? > 7,388.17 

5. Expresses, 25,523.19 

6. Total income, - . . 803,787.30 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - . 12,860.59 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - 225 060.33 

9. Income above operating expenses, - . 318 737.13 

10. Amount paid for interest,' - - - 77 056 13 

11. Total net income, - 241 681 00 

r one semi-annual of 4 per cent. 

12. Number and per cent, dividends J two quarterly of 2| per cent. 

( each. 

13. Amount paid in dividends, ... 16986600 

14. Paid to sinking fund, - . . nothing. 

15. Surplus for the year, .... 154,901.96 

16. Surplus last year, - . . 154,616.59 

17. Total surplus, - 154^616.59 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - . ^ 

Balance of accounts due the company, - C 154,616.59 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - - ) 

Other items, - for doing the business of the road. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



140 NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 



August 6, 1872. An insane woman living in Westerly stepped 
on the track ahead of the express train near Mystic and was 
killed. 

No other accident in Connecticut. 



Attest, S. D. BAB COCK, President. 
Attest, D. S. BABCOCK, Vice President. 



State of New York, > 
County of New York. ) 

New York, October 31, 1872. 
Then personally appeared S. D. Babcock, President, and D. S. 
Babcock, Vice President, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

WILLIAM P. DIXON, 

Notary Public, N. T. County. 



NEW YORK, PROVIDENCE AND BOSTON RAILROAD. 141 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 



President, SAMUEL D. BABCOCK, 37 William street, New 
York. • 

Vice President, DAVID S. BABCOCK, Pier 33 North River 
New York, 

Secretary, F. B. NO YES, Stonington, Ct. 

Treasurer, HENRY MORGAN, 39 William street, New York. 

Superintendent, A. S. MATHEWS, Stonington, Ct. 

Assistant Superintendent, J. B. GARDINER, Providence, R. I. 

General Ticket Agent, F. B. NOYES, Stonington, Ct. 

General Freight AgL, J. L. PROUTY, Stonington, Ct. 

General Freight Agent, E. F. BRADFORD, Providence, R. I. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

S. D. Babcock, 37 William street, D. S. Babcock, Pier 33 North 

New York. River) New Yor k. 

William F. Cart, Jr., N Y. Nathan F. Dixon, Westerly, 

John A. Burnham, Boston, Mass. R. I. 

Edward Morgan, 39 William Henry Morgan, 39 William 

street, New York. stre et, New York. 

S. B. Stone, Stonington, Ct. 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 



Return of the Shore Line Railroad Company, for the year ending 
September SOlh, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $1,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 1,000,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 1,000,000.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock is>ued, - 10,000 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 1,000,000.00 

9. Total market value on tbe 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - - 1,000,000.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 20,000 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 697,300 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 141 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$200,000.00 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 



143 



* Fir.-t mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
fRate of interest, (what?) percent., 
*Second mortgage bonds due (when?) 
fRate of interest (what ?) per cent, 
All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



Sept, 1, 1880. 

7 percent. 

none. 



none. 

200,000.00 

4,000.00 

all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, to present 

company, - 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering, also equipment.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. ^ Total cost of entire equipment, 

, (This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



$1,200,000.00 



24,000.00 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1 . Total length of main line of road, - - 50 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 50 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) - none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - - none. 

5. Total length of branches, ... none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 

tOn this line ^ivc the rate ofinterest paid on the bonds next previous. 

t The treasurer cannot estimate, as it was all leased to the N. Y. & N. H. rail- 
road company, with the road. 



144 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 



10. 

11. 

12 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 
17. 

18. 



Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

Aggregate length of sidings - - - 4 miles, 4,3.50 ft. 

Length of same in Connecticut, - - 4 miles, 4,3o0 ft. 

Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), - 50 miles. 

Length of same in Connecticut, - - 50 miles. 

ToUil length of double track, - - none. 

Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

Miles of track laid with steel rails and sleel top, 5i miles. 

Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 1 2,402 ft. 

Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - 280 ft. 

Aggregate length of stone arch' bridges, - none. 

Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - . . 71 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, - 2 

Name of each, - - - J Connecticut Valley. 

( New York and New Haven. 
* Total number of stations on the entire road, - 18 

Number of same in Connecticut, - 18 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTIIER COMPANIES, OPERATED BT THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. » 



none. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total lenjzth of all, ... - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

• by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 

t MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 

t Supplied by New York and New Haven railroad company and included in 
their report. 
*Dons not include stations on roads that are lea6cd. 



No. Weight in lbs. 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 145 

G. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 
gaged in construction, - - 239 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - - 33 miles an hour. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 29 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 25 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 15 miles. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 10c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... .OGc. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, .03 ic. 

4. General average rates, ... .03|c. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, 1 mile, Say- 
brook to Connecticut River, - $1.40, $1.20, $1.00, 80c. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, .08, .06 J, .05 V, .0 Ic. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - I2*c 

DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 172,897 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - 33,721 

8. Miles run by other trains, - - 25,045 

4. Total miles run, .... 231,653 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 279,169 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 8,004,173 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 5,365,823 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - - 15,825 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 562,360 
1 0. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ..... 5^27 

19 



146 SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OP ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, - 

3. New buildings, - - - none. 

4. New rolling stock, ... 

5. Any other expenditure, 

6. Total, - 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Wat/ and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $85,613.00 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 

New iron rails, 1,000 tons, cost $86,250.00 

Old iron rails taken up, 50,000.00 36,250.00 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

New steel rails, 500 tons, cost $49,150.00 

Old iron rails taken up, 25,000.00 24,150.00 

4. Repairs of bridges, - - - 26,059.63 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 4.250.21 

6. Repairs of fences, - - - 1,427.56 

7. Removing ice and snow, - ... nothing. 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - 177,750.40 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 3,555.01 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - - - $27,471.55 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... none. 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, . 9,552.02 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... 6,443.73 

5. Cost of fuel,— wood, coal,— coal, $26,668.54 ; 

wood, $1,231.21 ; total, - - 27,899.75 



* Tin: amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



SHORE LTNE RAILROAD. 



147 



G. Oil used by engines and cars, - - - 3,026.57 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 1,242.29 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 75,635.89 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 1,512.71 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, .... 

10. Insurance, - - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - - - - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



38,639.44 

10,284.86 

1,353.20 

none. 

433.25 

none. 

593.83 

196.22 

11,777.21 

none. 

none. 

nothing. 

nothing- 



8,131.11 

59,631.91 

1,192.64 

all. 

$313,018.20 

6,260.36 

all. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



148 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 



3. 

4. 

5, 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 

12. 

13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - - 

To and from other roads, * 

From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - - ~ - 

To and from other roads, 

U. S. Mails, 

Rents, .... 

Expresses, .... 

* Total income, .... 
Income per mile of road operated, 
Proportionate income for Connecticut, 
f Income above operating expenses, 
Amount paid for interest, 
Total net income, - 



$119,177.53 
175,373.22 



v none. 

7,566.96 
none. 
13,412.47 
387,346.97 
7,746.93 
all. 
100,000.00 
14,000.00 
86,000.00 
One dividend of 3^ per cent., 
Number and per cent, dividends, -I an extra 2 per cent., and one 

( dividend of 4 per cent. 
Amount paid in dividends, 
Paid to sinking fund, - 
Surplus for the year, 

Surplus last year, ... 

Total surplus, ... 



d 



18. Surplus invested as follows : 
Cash and loans, 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, ... 



94,769.00 

no sinking fund. 

none. 

none. 

7,640.98 

$7,640.98 
none, 
none, 
none. 



* The lessees after paying rent, $100,000, suffer a loss of $25,671.23 for the 
year. 

t No. 9 to No. 1 8 inclusive, include the statementof the Shore Line railway, and 
the amount of rental received from the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
railroad company. 



SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 149 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

March 30, 1872. Charles Bills, a deaf man, while walking on the 
track just west of New Loudon, was struck and killed. 

Attest, S. B. CHITTENDEN, Vice President. 
Attest, EDWARD S. SCRANTON, Treasurer. 



State of New York, > 
Cocnty of Kings. ) 

November 27, 1872. 
Then personally appeared S. B. Chittenden, Vice President, and 
made oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and 
correct, according to his best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

S. B. CHITTENDEN, Jr., 

Notary Public, Kings County. 



State of Connecticut, ) 
County of New Haven. ) 

November 29, 1872. 
Then personally appeared E. S. Scranton, Treasurer, and made 
oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and correct, 
according to his best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

SAMUEL H. BARROWS, 

Notary Public. 



150 SHORE LINE RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. * 

President, SERENO H. SCRANTON, New Haven. 
Vice President, SIMEON B. CHITTENDEN, New York. 
Secretary, EDWARD S. SCRANTON, New Haven. 
Treasurer, EDWARD S. SCRANTON, New Haven. 
Superintendent, WILLIAM M. WILCOX, New Haven. 

DIRECTORS. 

S. H. Scranton, New Haven. S. B. Chittenden, New York. 

C. G. Landon, New York. Edward Ingraham, New Haven. 

J. M. Townsend, New Haven. C. S. Bushnkll, New Haven. 
A. N. Ramsdell, New London. 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 



Return of the Trustees of the Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad 
Company, for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 



1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

' 1. Capital stock authorized by charter, - unknown to tr'stees. 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - . . . _ a ,« 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - « « 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, - " " 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in ca>h or its equiva- 
lent, - - . . « u 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - " « 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - " « 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, « u 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - - . . « « 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, " « 

11. Proportion of Slock issued for Connecticut, " « 

12. Amount of stock held in Counecticut, " " 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, " " 

DEBTS. 

1. Total amouut of funded debt, - 



152 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?) 

f Rate of interest, (what?) per cent., - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
f Rate of interest (what?) percent., 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



+ COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost, of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



§ CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, from Boston 

to Willimantic, .... 85f miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 34^ miles. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 

t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 

t Represented to the trustees by the amount of the Berdcll bonds, $20,000,000.00 
and the underlying bonds including those secured by the mortgage of the Hart- 
ford and Providence Railroad Company, amounting in all to about $2,500,000.00. 
Total, about $22,500,000.00. 

§ The entire line owned and leased of finished road is 320% miles; incomplete 
from Waterbury to l<"ishkill, 65 y 3 miles. Total, 386 miles. 



169 miles, 2,925 ft. 


45 


miles, 2,360 ft. 


- 


12^ miles. 




none. 


- 


none. 




7,072 ft. 


- 


241 ft. 




315 ft. 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 153 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), in Mas- 
sachusetts, ----- 51^ miles. 

f Woonsocket division, 33| miles. 

4. Name and length of branches,-? Southbridge branch, 17^ miles. 

( Dedham branch, 2 miles. 

5. Total length of branches, ... 53^ miles. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 7\ miles. 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - - - 18 miles, 285 ft. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 2 miles, 5,000 ft. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), finished, 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

1 6. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - 13 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - - none, except our own leased road. 

19. Name of each, ... Norwich and Worcester. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 64 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - 12 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, Norwich 

and Worcester from Worcester to Allyn's 

Point, ----- 66y% miles. 

23. Total length of all, ... - 66y% miles. 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, - 48 miles. 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by the trustees, ... - 82 miles. 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, - 22 miles. 

*Docs not include stations on roads that arc leased, nor on the Hartford, Prov- 
idence and Fishkill Railroad. 
20 



- 28 


43 


36 


m 


282 


6A 8 ff 


15 


16 


125 





154 BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in tons. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. * Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, ... 625 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - - 30 miles. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - 26 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 21 miles. 
1 0. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 10 miles. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 10c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, .... 5c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3f\ 7 o" c - 

4. General average rates, ... 2- I 1 5 4 ( jC. 

5. *Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - 349,863 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - 1 65,603 



* These figures cannot be given, as they were lost in the fire at Boston, No- 
vember 9, 1872. 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 155 

3. Miles run by other trains, ... 28,126 

4. Total miles run, - - - - 543,592 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 1,671,692 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 16,003,065 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - 5,355,968 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - 345,662 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 9,454,389 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ..... 5,749,647 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, between Put- 

nam and Willimantic, - - - $1,743.25 

2. Land or land damages, ... 5,592.38 

3. New buildings, - - - - 756.83 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 92,287.07 

5. Any other expenditure, machinery, tools and 

bridges, - - ' - - 24,676.74 

6. Renewal of Dedham branch, - . - 11,910.41 



7. Total, ..... $136,966.68 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $69,810.85 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 896 tons, - 73,199.82 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, - - - 22,183.26 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 5,977.21 

6. Repairs of fences, - - - - 1,858.42 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... 4,00 

*The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what 
has been added during the year. 



156 BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 

8. Total for maintenance of way, - 173,033.56 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 139 miles, 1,244 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, ... $32,172.41 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... 1,434.25 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 31,048.37 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - - 32 ; 508.87 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood and coal, — wood, $1,192.50 ; 

coal, $93,791.31 ; total, - - - 94,983.81 

6. Oil, ----- | 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, \ 

8 Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 198,087.76 

9. * Cost per mile of road operated, the 

whole year, 112 miles, - - 1,775.00 

10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... $80,708.12 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - - - 85,925.33 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, - - - 21,208.94 

4. Gratuities, - - - - > 

- ~ I ■ . . . f- 2,498.11 

0. Damages tor injuries to persons, ) 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - 339.50 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 1,516.23 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, ..... 4,323.31 

9. Taxes, ----- 6,840.14 

10. Insurance, ----- 5,050.00 

11. Telegraph expenses, ... none. 

*Thc Willimantic division, from Putnam to Willimantic, was not opened until 
August 19, 1872. 



157 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, Norwich 

and Worcester Railroad Company, - - 12,666.93 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, nothing. 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 44,656.53 

15. Total miscellaneous, - - 265,733.14 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 2,372.00 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 637,454.46 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, - 5,691.00 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 

INCOME. 



From passengers : 

On main road and branches operated by 

Trustees, - - $278,676.49 

To and from other roads, - 65,214.10 



2. From freight : 

On main road and branches operated by 

Trustees,! - 

To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. mails, - 

4. Rents, ..... 

5. Expresses, - - - - 

6. Total income, ... 

7. Income per mile of road operated the whole 

year, 112 miles, - - . . 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 
9. Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, - - 

11. Total net income, - 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... 



$343,890.59 



403,839.52 

6,209.35 

10,587.15 

76,805.13 

841,391.74 

7,508.92 

203,937.28 

11,050.00 

192,887.28 

none. 

nothing. 

nothing. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 
t Separate statistics for freight destroyed by fire. 



158 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 



15. Surplus for the year, - 

16. Surplus last year, 

17. Total surplus, - 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash, - - - - 

Balance of accounts due the company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, including interest, 



none, 
none, 
none. 

20,984.76 

18,831.90 

8,547.66 

155,572.96 

$203,987.28 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 



None in Connecticut. 

Attest, 
Attest, 



WILLIAM S. HART, 
CHARLES P. CLARK, 



(Trustees, under the mortgage made March 19, 
1872, by the Boston, Hartford and Erie Rail- 
road to Burdell et als.) 



State of Massachusetts, ) 
County of Suffolk. ) 

Boston, December 6th, 1872. 

Then personally appeared William S. 'Hart and Charles P. Clark, 
Trustees, and severally made oath that the foregoing return by them 
subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best knowledge and 
belief. Before me, 
In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my 

/— — ^— s official seal as a Commissioner of deeds for the stale of 
•j l. s. > Connecticut, at my office at said Boston, and county and 

•— ^r— -> state aforesaid, on the day and year last above written. 

JAMES B. BELL, 

Commissioner of deeds for the state of Connecticut, residing in 
Boston. 



BOSTON, HARTFORD AND ERIE RAILROAD. 159 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 



/ WILLIAM T. HART, Boston. 
Trustees, 1 GEORGE TALBOT OLYPHANT, New York. 

(CHARLES P. CLARK, Boston. 
General Superintendent, WILLIAM M. PARKER, Boston. 
Division Superintendent, E. H. TUCKER, Needham, Mass. 
General Ticket Agent, A. C. KENDALL, Boston. 
General Freight Agent, CHARLES WALKER, Boston. 



board of directors. 

None- 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD, 



Return of the Connecticut Valley Railroad Company, for the year 
ending September 3(kh, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $1,500,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 1,500,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 1,033,500.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 10,335 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 1,033,500.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - - 258,375.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 22,9GG.66 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 951,000.00 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 166 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$998,000.00 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 



161 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?) Dec. 1, 1,900, $998,000.00 

t Rate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 7 per cent. 

*Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) none. 

fRate of interest (what?) per cent, - - none. 
All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, .- - 973,000.00 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 1,99 1,000.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 43,800.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine, and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



$2,403,589.46 



53,413.08 

all. 

246,174.82 



5,470.55 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - - 45 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 45 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) - none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - - none. 

5. Total length of branches, ... not any. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 
21 



162 CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - not any. 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - - 4 $ftfij miles. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), .... 45 miles. 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 45 miles. 

11. Total length of double track, - - none. 
12 Length of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, • - - not any. 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 17,820 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - not any. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - not any. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - 53 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 2 

, n xt c 1 (New York, New Haven and Hartford 

19. Name of each, ■< ' 

( New Haven, Middletown and Willlimantic. 
2>'. * Total number of stations on the entire road, - 11 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

ROADS BELONGING TO OTHKR COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total length of all, - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



)■ not any. 



MOTIVE POAVER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 

*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



6 


60,000 


12 


40,320 


100 


20,160 


5 


35,840 


40 





CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 163 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - - 142 

7. Average rate of speed of express • passenger 

trains when in motion, - - none. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - none. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 22 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - 18 miles. 



PARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - - 7c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... 4 C , 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3-jSjC 

4. General average rates, ... 3^0. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 32, 26^, 21, 21c. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ion per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 7^, 6 T \, 4^, 3^0. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 11, 9^, 8, 7j 2 <jC. 

DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 43,575 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - 20,650 

3. Miles run by other trains, - - 2,068 

4. Total miles run, - - - 66,293 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 205,441 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 3,072,001 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 187,903 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - • 16,070 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 240,170 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, . - no contract with other roads. 



164 CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - $100,036.81 

2. Land or land damages, - 125,867.89 

3. New buildings, - ... 54,325.15 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 139,012.05 

5. Any other expenditure, - - 26,986.09 

Superstructure, .... 53,209.02 

Bridges, .... 18,755.44 



6. Total, ... - $518,190.45 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $15,396.95 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - not any. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - not any. 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 1,406.85 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 975.45 

6. Repairs of fences, ... 159.90 

7. Removing ice and snow, - ... nothing. 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - 17,939.15 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 398.65 
1 0. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - - $3,321.41 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... nothing. 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 4,363.40 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... 3,985.19 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, - - 12,159.14 



* The amounts under this heading arc also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 



165 



and other material used for cleaning, 



6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 

7. Waste 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$1,562.83 
314.94 

25,706.91 

571.26 

all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal, men, gatekeepers, 

and watchmen, - 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, .... 

11. Telegraph expenses, - - - - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for u.se of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 
included in No. 1 and No. 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

1 6. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total co.-t per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$30,171.59 

18,813.72 

3,980.26 

152.12 

118.50 

300.00 

' 518.16 

nothing. 

66.00 

710.58 

nothing. 

nothing. 



2 miscellaneous. 

610.51 

55,441.93 

1,232.04 

all. 


$99,087.99 

2,202.00 

all. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



166 CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - .... $102,863.98 
To and from other roads, - - nothing. 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 36,464.20 
To and from other roads, - - nothing. 

3. U. S. Mails, ----- 1,538.04 

4. Rents, ----- 2,132.70 

5. Expresses, - 1,852.51 

6. Total income, - - - - 144,851.43 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - - 3,218.92 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - all. 

9. Income above operating expenses, - - 45,763.44 

10. Amount paid for interest, - - 38,373.08 

11. Total net income, - 7,390.36 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - - nothing. 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - - - nothing. 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... nothing. 

15. Surplus for the year, - - - 7,390.36 

16. Surplus last year, - « - nothing. 

17. Total surplus, ----- 7,390.36 

• 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - - - $1,376.38 

Balance of accounts due the Company, - not any. 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - - not any. 

Other items, construction account, - 6,013.98 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 



167 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

August, 1872. David Jones, a brakeman, was found lying sense- 
less by the side of the track near Essex station, and lived but a few 
days. 

Attest, J. C. WALKLEY, President. 
Attest, N. HOLLISTER, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, ") 
County of Hartford. ) 

Hartford, December 31, 1872. 
Then personally appeared James C. Walkley, President, and 
N. Hollister, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

HENRY S. BARBOUR, 



Notary Public. 



168 CONNECTICUT VALLEY RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 

President, JAMES C. WALKLEY, Hartford, Conn. 
Vice President, LUTHER BOARDMAN, East Hadtlam, Conn. 
Secretary, LEVI WOODHOUSE, Hartford, Conn. 
Treasurer, NELSON HOLLISTER, Hartford, Conn. 
Superintendent, HIRAM FOWLER, Hartford, Conn. 
General Ticket Agent, H. A. STONE, Hartford, Conn. 
General Freight Agent, H. A. STONE, Hartford, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

J. C. Walkley, Hartford, Conn. Elisha P. Smith, Hartford, Conn. 

L. Boardman, East Haddam, Frederick R. Foster, Hart- 
Conn, ford, Conn. 

N. Hollister, Hartford, Conn. Joseph S. Woodruff, Hartford, 

S. M. Comstock, Centre Brook, Conn. 

Conn. G. F. Hubbard, Middletown, 

Samuel Babcock, Middletown, Conn. 

Conn. F. B. Cooley, Hartford, Conn. 

0. H. Clark, Chester, Conn. George Beach, Hartford, Conn. 

Elisha Stevens, Cromwell, Conn. 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



Return of the Connecticut Western Railroad Company, for the year 
ending Sept. 80th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

ply? - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 

including towns and corporations, - 



$3,000,000.00 

3.000,000.00 
1,504,027.68 

none. 



none. 

14,479 .-hares. 

1U0.00 

1,447,900.00 

none. 

21,707.65 

all. 

1,441,900.00 

214 



DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, 
22 



$2,436,500.00 



170 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



First mortgage bonds due (when?), July 1, 1900, $2,436,500.00 



t Rate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - 
* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
f Rate of interest (what?) percent., 
All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



) 



none. 



96,323.12 

2,532,823.12 

37,973.48 

all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, statious, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same ibr Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



3,797,664.95 



56,936.50 

all. 

295,321.57 



4,427.60 
all. 



CHARACTEKISTICS. 



1. Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), 

4. Name and length of branches, - 

5. Total length of branches, 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 



66.7 miles, 
all. 



none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 

t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



171 



7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 

18. 



20. 
21. 



Aggregate length of sidings, ... 7 miles. 

Length of same in Connecticut, - - all. 

Total length of track for the entire road (single 
track miles), .... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 
Total length of double track, - . - 

Length of same in Connecticut, 
Miles of track laid with steel rails, 
Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 
Aggregate length of iron bridges, 
Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 
Number of public highways crossed at grade in 
Connecticut, - - - - 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, . - , - - 
Name of each, Housatonic. 
Naugatuck. 
New Haven and Northampton 

twice. 
Hartford, Providence and Fishkill 
road in yard at Hartford. 
* Total number of stations on the entire road, 
Number of same in Connecticut, 



66.7 miles, 
all. 
none, 
none, 
none. 
7,209 ft. 
none, 
none. 

74 



Railroad, 



Rail- 

24 
24 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY DNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, Dutchess 

and Columbia railroad, - - - 

23. Total length of all, .... 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this Company, - - - - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



1.6 miles. 


1.6 miles. 


none. 


26 


24 



*Does not include stationson roads that are leased. 



172 CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, 8 70,000 

2. * Number of passenger cars, average weight, 10 40,000 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 40 18,000 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 2 30,000 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, including 20 

dumps, ----- 135 16,000 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, ... 170 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger \ 

trains when in motion, - - >• none. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - ) 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 20 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ..... 15 miles. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - no fare less than 10c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, .... 5c. per mile. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3-j^c. per mile. 

4. General average rates, ... 3-j-J^c. per mile. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 45c, 30c, 25c., none. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, 

all classes per contract, 3 cents. 

7. Average rate of freight pe»ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - all classes, 9 cents. 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - 72,287 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - 38,637 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



173 



3. Miles rim by other trains, ... 35,956 

4. Total miles run, - 146,880 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 151, G38 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 2,414,879 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - 62,224 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - 60,467 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 1,098,647 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, 28,825 



* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE YEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, 

3. New buildings, 

4. New rolling stock, 

5. Any other expenditure, - ■ 

6. Total, ... 



none. 

$258,980.72 

68,790.39 

197,335.38 

913,291.54 

$1,438,398.03 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE TEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $25,352.01 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 710.91 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 1,491.50 

6. Repairs offences, .... 74.07 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... 3,325.66 

8. Total for maintenance ol way, •- 30,954.15 



*Thc amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what 
has been added during the year. 



174 CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 453.21 

10. Proportion for Connecticut, - 30,229.02 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - $4 572 57 

2. Repairs of machinery, - none 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 1,612.45 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... 253621 

5. Cost of fuel, — woodandcoal, — total, - 17 416.21 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 1 (599.36 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 617.56 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - 28,454.86 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 416.61 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - . 27 788 29 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. 



Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, - $10 319 08 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - - . 57,880.20 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, - - included in item No. 2. 

4. Gratuities, - 

... none. 

O. Damages for injuries to persons, - 95 fO 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - . . 20 00 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, - - - 

y. laxes, - - - . _ 16 53 

10. Insurance, ..... l^mfiQ 

11. Telegraph expenses, ... 

° r r ' none. 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

Dutchess and Columbia Railroad, - ] 250 00 

Hartford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad, 6 028.56 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 



none. 



42.07 



none. 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



175 



14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex 
penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 21,463.65 

15. Total miscellaneous, - - 98,544.29 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 1,442.81 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 96,235.80 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 157,953.30 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, - 2,312.64 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, - 154,253.10 

INCOME. 



1. 


From passengers : 










On main road and branches owned 


by 


Com- 






pany, 


- 


- 


$80,569.28 




To and from other roads, 




- 


2,293.36 


2. 


From freight : 










On main road and branches owned 


by 


Com- 






pany, 


- 


- 


68,961.32 




To and from other roads, 




- 


67,053.70 


3. 


U. S. mails, - 


- 


- 


2,372.53 


4. 


Rents, _ - - - 




- 


none. 


5. 


Expresses, - 


- 


- 


2,315.06 


6. 


Total income, 




- 


223,565.25 


7. 


Income per mile of road operated, 


- 


- 


3,273.32 


8. 


Proportionate income for Connecticut, 




- 


218,327.94 


9. 


Income above operating expenses, 


- 


- 


65,611.95 


10. 


Amount paid for interest, 




- 


172,130.00 


11. 


Total net income, 


- 


- 




12. 


Number and per cent, dividends, - 




- 


none. 


13. 


Amount paid in dividends, 


- 


- 


none. 


14. 


Paid to sinking fund, 




- 


none. 


15. 


Surplus for the year, - 


- 


- 


none. 


16. 


Surplus last year, 




- 


none. 


17. 


Total surplus, - - 


- 


■ 


none. 


18. 


Surplus invested as follows : 
Cash and loans, 










Balance of accounts due the company, 


- 






Materials, fuel, and stores, 




- 






Other items, 


- 


- 





* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



176 CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

January 24, 1872. William Lyons, a brakeman, was killed at 
Salisbury by falling under the train. No blame attached to any 
employees on the train. 

May 27. Felix Gallahan, a brakeman, had his leg broke while 
coupling cars at Winsted. Employees not to blame. 

August 15. Clifford II ill, a brakeman, had his arm broke while 
coupling cars at Winsted. No blame attached to auy one on the 
train. 

. Attest, W. H. BARNUM, President. 
Attest, WM. L. GILBERT, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, ) 
County of Hartford, j 

Hartford, Jan. 17, 1873. 
Then personally appeared Wm. H. Barnum, President, and Wil- 
liam S. Gilbert, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the fore- 
going return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according 
to their best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

N. B. STEVENS, 

Notary Public. 



CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD. 



177 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, Hon. W. H. BARNUM, Lime Rock, Conn. 
Vice President, GEORGE M. BARTHOLOMEW, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Secretary, GEORGE S. FRINK, Hartford, Conn. 
Treasurer, WILLIAM L. GILBERT, Winsted, Conn. 
Superintendent, W. H. YEOMANS, Hartford, Conn. 
General Ticket Agent, F. T. STUDLEY, Hartford, Conn. 
General Freight Agent, D. P. WILLIAMS, Hartford, Conn. 

DIRECTORS. 



William H. Barnum, Lime 
Rock, Conn. 

James L. Howard, Hartford, 
Conn. 

N. B. Stevens, Hartford, Conn. 

Jonathan B. Bunce, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Wm. L. Gilbert, West Win- 
sted, Conn. 

Egbert W. Butler, Norfolk, 
Conn. 



A. H. Hollet, Lakeville, Conn. 

Geo. M. Bartholomew, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Geo. W. Moore, Hartford, Conn. 

Charles R. Chapman, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Byron Loomis, Suffield, Conn. 

George Dddlet, West Win- 
sted, Conn. 

Frederick Watson, Canaan, 
Conn. 



23 



DANBURY AND NORWALK RAILROAD. 



Return of the Danbury and Norivalk Railroad Company, for the 
year ending September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $1,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 600,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 332,100.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - 207,900.00 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cask or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock isMicd, - 12,000 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 50.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 600,000.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - 450,000.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 17,751.45 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, - all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 248,200.00 

13. Number of Stockbolders residing in Connecticut, 96 

DKBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - - - $407,500.00 



DANBURY AND NORWALK RAILROAD. 



179 



* First mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
fRate of interest, (what?) percent., 



Oct. 1,1880, 



*First and Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 

July 1, 1890, .... 
fRate of interest (what ?) per cent, 
All others describe in same manner, 

First, Second, and Third mortgage bonds, 
due July 1, 1892, rate of interest 7 per 
cent., - 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



$100,000.00 
7 percent. 

200,000.00 
7 per cent. 



107,500.00 
86,053.33 

493,553.33 

14,602.02 

all. 



COST. 

1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) 

4. Name and length of branches, - 

Brancliville to Ridgefield, 

Bethel to Hawleyville, - - - 



1,108,448.29 



32,794.33 

all. 

145,283.23 



4,298.32 
all. 



23^ miles. 
23-^ miles. 

none. 

4 miles. 
6 miles. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 



tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next 



previous. 



180 



DANBURY AND NORWALK RAILROAD. 



10. 
11. 
12. 

13. 
14. 

15. 
16. 
17. 

18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 



Total length of branches, - 

Lengtli of same in Connecticut, 

Aggregate length of sidings, - 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of track for the entire road, (single 
track miles), .... 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of double track, 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

Number of public highways crossed at grade in 
Connecticut, - 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, - 

Name of each, - - - - - 

* Total number of stations on the entire road, 

Number of same in Connecticut, - 



10 miles. 


10 


miles. 


4 1 


miles. 


4i 


miles. 


38& 


miles. 


38^ 


miles 




none 




none. 




none 


1,008 ft 




none 




none 



61 

none. 

none. 
14 
14 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total length of all, ... - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



> 



none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 



1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, - 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 



No. 


Weight in lbs. 


6 

6 

72 

2 


59,000 
30,000 
16,000 
20,000 


none. 



*Does not include stations on roads that arc leased. 



DANBURY AND NORWALK RAILROAD. 181 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - - 102 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - - 25 miles per hour. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 20 miles. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 20 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - - - - - 15 miles. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, (no fare less 

than 10c.) ----- 8c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... 4 T * 5 c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 3^0. 

4. General average rates, - 4c. 

5. Highest through rate of freight per ton per mile 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, 11^, 9^0., no other. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 10, 7J, 5c, no other. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 12, 10c. no other. 



DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 66,067 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - 27,660 

3. Miles run by other trains, - - 7,280 

4. Total miles run, .... 101,553 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 159,330 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 1,999,666 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 497,916 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, ... 44,653 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 982,360 
1 0. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, ..... 11,163 



182 DANBURY AND NORWALK RAILROAD. 

♦expenditures charged to cost of road and equipment 
dur1xg the year. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - - ) 

2. Land or land damages, V $255,085.97 

3. New buildings, - - . . ) 

4. New rolling stock, - - . 6,500.00 

5. Any other expenditure, dock improvements, 4,509.86 



6. Total, - $266,095.83 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $10,044.88 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 150 tons, $70, 10,500.00 

3. New steel rails (No. of ions and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, - - - 1,135.91 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 1,261.64 

6. Repairs of fences, ... 466.98 

7. Removing ice and snow, - - included in road repairs. 



8. Total for maintenance of way, - 23,409.41 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 692.58 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - - ) $8 686 48 

2. Repairs of machinery, - - - ) 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, ) „ _ pt . _ 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - - -) 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, total, - - 16,103.17 



• The amounts under tln.s heading are also included in t!u> permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



NORWALK AND DANBURY RAILROAD. 



183 



G. Oil used by engines and cars, - - - ) 

7. Waste and oilier material used for cleaning,) 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



included above. 



34,555.12 

1,022.34 
all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, .... 

4. Gratuities, - - - - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - | 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, f 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, - 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expendimre for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$33,81C28 



564.59 

5,000.00 
none, 
none. 

none. 

none. 



4,978.03 

44,358.90 

1,312.40 

all. 



$102,323.43 

3,027.20 

all. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



184 DANBURY AND NOItWALK RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - .... $79,666.61 
To and from other roads, - - about one-third. 

2. From freight : 

On main road and brandies owned by Com- 
pany, - 84,841.79 
To and from other roads, - - about one-fifth. 

3. U. S. Mails, - 2,120 

4. Rents, - - - - - 1,891.50 

5. Expresses, .... 3,600.00 

6. Total income, - 172,119.90 

7. Income per mile of road operated, - - 5,092.30 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, - all. 

9. Income above operating expenses, - - 69,796.47 

10. Amount paid for interest, - - 23,789.18 

11. Total net income, .... 46,007.29 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, two, one of 3 

per cent., and one of 5 per cent., 

13. Amount paid in dividends, ... 42,000.00 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... nothing. 

15. Surplus for the year, ... 4,007.29 

16. Surplus last year, ... 21,674.45 

17. Total surplus, - - - - - 25,681.74 



18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, ... $420.75 

Balance of accounts due the Company, - 6,262.13 

Materials, fuel, and stores, - ■ - 18,998.96 

Other items, .... 25,681.74 



NORWALK AND DANBURY RAILROAD. 185 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

October 26, 1871. Charles Comstock, walking on track near 
Wilton, was run into by an extra freight train and had one of his legs 
cut off. 

September 26, 1872. Gideon Leeds walking on track near Nor- 
walk depot was run into by a passenger train and had one of his 
arms cut off. 

Attest, EDWIN LOCKWOOD, President. 
Attest, H. WILLIAMS, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, 
County of Fairfield 



.} 



December 2, 1872: 
Then personally appeared Edwin Lockwood, President, and Har- 
vey Williams, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

JOHN W. BACON, 

Notary Public. 



24 



186 NORWALK AND DANBURY RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, EDWIN LOCKWOOD, Norwalk. 
Vice President, LEGRAND LOCKWOOD, New York. 
Secretary, H. WILLIAMS, Danbury. 
Treasurer, H. WILLIAMS, Danbury. 
Superintendent, JOHN W. BACON, Danbury. 
General Ticket Agent, H. WILLIAMS, Danbury. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Edwin Lockwood, Norwalk. Wm. C. Street, Norwalk. 

Jonathan Camp, Norwalk. Asa E. Smith, Norwalk. 

Eben Hill, Norwalk. LeGrand Lockwood, N. Y. 

Edwin Sherwood, Soutbport. Joseph Richardson, Bridge- 
Henry Smith, Ridgefield. port. 

Owen Benedeck, Bethel. D. P. Nichols, Danbury. 

L. P. Hott, Danbury. Wm. Turber, Fairfield. 
Wm. K. James, Norwalk, 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 

Return of the New Haven and Derby Railroad Company, for the 
year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 



1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, ..... 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in ca.-h or its equiva- 
lent, - - - ' - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, .... 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 

including towns and corporations, 



§700,000.00 

455,700.00 
455,700.00 

none. 



none. 

4,557 

100.00 

455,700.00 

per share 1.00 

35,054.85 
455,700.00 
426,000.00 

320 



DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - 



$525,000.00 



188 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?), - May 1, li 
f Rate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - - 7 per cent. 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when?) - Feb. 1, 1890. 
t Rate of interest (what?) percent., - 7 per cent. 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, * - - - 75,000.00 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 600,000.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 46,153.80 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



$1,055,700.00 



81,209.69 

all. 

74,760.00 



5,750.77 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, 13 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 13 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - none. 

5. Total length of branches, - - none. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 



* On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 
t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



189 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, ' - 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 

19. Name of each, - 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, 



6,000 ft. 
6,000 ft. 

13 miles. 
13 miles. 

none. 

none. 

none. 
8,060 ft. 

none. 

none. 

20 



Naugatuck. 
8 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, - 

23. Total length of all, - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this Company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

1. Number of engine?, average weight with tender 

full, - 

2. * Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise, cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 



No. 


Wright in lbs. 


3 


76,000 


3 


28,000 


7 


15,500 


2 


24,000 


20 


13,500 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



190 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, ... 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger \ 

trains when in motion, - - v 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - ) 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 
10. * Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, - 



40 



none. 



22 miles. 



none. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 



1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, - - - - 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 

4. General average rates, ... 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 20c, 15c, 13c, 10c 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third and fourth classes, 10c, 10c, 10c, 10c 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 13c, 12c, 10c, 10c 



05c 



.04£c. 
04±c. 
041c 



DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, - 39,287 

2. t Miles run by freight trains, - - none. 

3. Miles run by other trains, ... 2,660 

4. Total miles run, - - - - 41,947 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 125,957 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 934,675 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... - 318,270 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - 11,116 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 122,276 
10. Tons of merchandise carried (o and from other 

roads, - none. 



* All trains mixed. 

I Freights ran with passenger trains. 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



191 



* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, - none- 

2. Land or land damages, ... none. 

3. New buildings, .... 1,854.93 

4. New rolling stock, - - - 1,868.11 

5. Any other expenditure, iron rails, fences, 

bridges, and ballasting track, - - 12,406.46 

6. Total, .... $16,129.50 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... $12,828.52 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 2,497.73 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 293.29 

6. Repairs offences, - - - - 17.00 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... none. 

8. Total for maintenance of way, - 15,636.54 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 1,202.81 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 



1. Repairs of locomotives, 

2. Repairs of machinery, - - - 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 

4. Repairs of freight cars, 



53,491.54 

none. 

2,176.78 

1,046.36 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what 
has heen added during the year. 



192 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



5. Cost of fuel, — wood and coal, — total, - $7,125.06 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 777.78 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 364.54 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - 14,982.06 

9. Co^t per mile of road operated, 1,152.46 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, ... 

4. Gratuities, - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, ... 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, - 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, ... 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, Naugatuck Railroad, 458.34 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, none. 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 2,564.00 

15. Total miscellaneous, - - 26,520.85 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 2,040.06 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - all. 
1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 57,139.45 



$10,543.48 

5,284.42 

3,066.73 

none. 

625.00 

none. 

none. 

2,741.00 

1,076.75 

161.13 

none. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



193 



2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



4,395.34 
all 



INCOME. 



2. 



3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 



From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 

To and from other roads, 
From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 

To and from other roads, 
U. S. mails, - - 

Rents, - 
Expresses, - 

Total income, ... 

Income per mile of road operated, - 
Proportionate income for Connecticut, 
Income above operating expenses, 
Amount paid for interest, - - 
Total net income, . . . . 

Number and per cent, dividends, - 
Amount paid in dividends, 
Paid to sinking fund, ... 
Surplus for the year, - 
Surplus last year, ... 

Total surplus, . 

Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, ... 

Balance of accounts due the company, 

Materials, fuel, and stores, 

Other items, - 



$38,226.39 
13,367.34 



11,016.27 

none. 

550.00 

1,647.22 

1,607.42 

66,414.64 

5,108,81 

all. 

9,375.19 

23,899.02 

nothing 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 



25 



194 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

There has been no accident on this road during the past year. 

Attest, MORRIS TYLER, President. 
Attest, CHARLES AT WATER, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, ) 

County of New Haven, j 

New Haven, January 9, 1873. 
Then personally appeared Morris Tyler, President, and Charles 
Atwater, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their bes 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

FRANCIS E. HARRISON, 

Notary Public. 



NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD. 195 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, MORRIS TYLER, New Haven. 
Vice President, HENRY S. DAWSON, New Haven. 
Secretary, FRANCIS E. HARRISON, New Haven. 
Treasurer, CHARLES AT WATER, New Haven. 
Superintendent, E. S. QUINTARD, New Haven. 
General Ticket Agent, FRANCIS E. HARRISON. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Morris Tyler, New Haven. Henry S. Dawson, New Haven. 

Edwin Marble, New Haven. J. H. Bartholomew, Ansonia. 

G. W. Shelton, Birmingham. Chas. Atwater, New Haven. 

H. P. Frost, New Haven. Isaac Anderson, New Haven. 

T. S. Cornell, Birmingham. F. Farrell, Ansonia. 

Thos. Wallace, Jr., Ansonia. Chas. L. English, New Haven. 

N. D. Sperry, New Haven. N. T. Bushnell, New Haven. 

On behalf of the City of New Haven. 

Hon. H. G. Lewis, Mayor, ex- W. H. Bradley, Alderman. 
officio. 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 

Return of the Shepaug Valley Railroad Company, for the year 
ending September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 



1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $1,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, - - - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued ibr earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment iias 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, ... 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, all in 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



442',300.00 
434,170.00 

none. 

none. 

4,290 

100.00 

429,000.00 

nothing. 

13,406 

Connecticut. 

380,900.00 

260 



DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, 



$600,000.00 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



197 



* Fiiv.t mortgage bonds due (when ?) April 1,1891, $400,000.00 
fRate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 7 per cent. 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when?) Janu- 

ary 1, l'J02, - ... 200,000.00 

t Rate of interest (what?) percent, - - 7 per cent. 
All others describe in same manner, 

No coupons yet payable on Second mortgage. No others. 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - nothing 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 600,000.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 18,750.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - - $754,984,09 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 23,410.36 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, - - 64,724.67 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 2,006.96 
<'>. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all. 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

lTolal length of main line of road, - - 32^ miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - all in Connecticut. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) - none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - - - none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 

tnc column. 

tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



198 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



5. Total length of branches, ... none. 

6. Lengtli of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

7. Aggregate length of sidings, - - - %tot> miles. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - all in Connecticut. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), .... 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 2 

1 9. Name of each, - - Boston, Hartford and Erie Railroad. 

Housatonic Railroad. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 11 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - 11 



321 m i]e S . 
all. 
noi\e. 
nope, 
none. 
660 ft. 
-none. 
20 ft. 

32 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY TIIIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total length of all, - - - - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 



none. 



No. 


Weight in lbs. 


3 


60,000 


2 


20,000 


4 


16,000 


1 


20,000 


20 


16,000 



* Does uot inelude stations on roads that arc leased. 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 199 

C. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 
gaged in construction, - . 5 q 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - ' 18 miles per w 

b. Average rate of same, including stops, - i G miles# 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 13 mi i es * 

10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ... , ^ ., 

lb miles. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 



1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - . 5 C 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, _ . , 

4— c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, sl c . 

4. General average rates, - ? 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for 

first, second, third and fourth classes, 53c , 4Gc, 40c, 33c. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 8c, 7c, 5c, 4c 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 12c, 10c, 9c, 8c 



DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Miles run by passenger trains, - - 10 336 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - - . 10 | 336 

3. Miles run by other trains, - . 9 ' 375 

4. Total miles run, - 30047 

5. Number of passengers carried, - . 10692 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 183,'754 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - . ,^-n 

Q rp „ , ' - 1^6,500 

». Ions of merchandise carried, - 6 523 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 144^163 
10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

r ° ads ' ----- 5,997 



200 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING- THE TEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, and fencing, 

3. New buildings, 

4. New rolling stock, 

5. Any other expenditure, 

6. Total, 



nothing. 

$12,906.87 

6,899.99 

13,134.30 

$32,941.16 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 



Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, - - - - • - 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, 

6. Repairs of fences, - 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... 

8. Total for maintenance of way, 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



,472.42 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



6,472.42 

202.25 

all. 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 



1. Repairs of locomotives, - 

2. Repairs of machinery, . . . 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail cars, 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, total, - 



$1,307.58 



2,284.92 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what has 
been added during the year. 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 

7. Waste and o'her material used for cleaning, 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, - 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



201 

$588.16 

4,180.66 

129.62 

all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gatekeepers, 

and watchmen, .... 

4. Gratuities, .... 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, .... 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expendiiure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



> 



} 



$2,863.10 



nothing. 

nothing. 

70.00 

217.83 

not paid. 

570.50 

none. 

nothing. 

nothing. 



1,827.16 

5,548.59 

172.05 

all. 

$16,201.67 

503.92 

all. 



* Total amount of the three previous articles. 
26 



202 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 



1. 


From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 






pany, - .... 


$3,105.31 




To and from other roads, 


4,743.99 


2. 


From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 






pany, - 


1,358.00 




To and from other roads, 


4,836.32 


3. 


U. S. Mails, - - - - 


201.55 


4. 


Rents, - 


none. 


5. 


Expresses, .... 


65.36 


6. 


Total income, - 


14,310.53 


7. 


Income per mile of road operated, 


443.73 


8. 


Proportionate income for Connecticut, 


all. 


9. 


Income above operating expenses, 


none. 


10. 


Amount paid for interest, 


16,986.15 


11. 


Total net income, - 


none. 


12. 


Number and per cent, dividends, - 


none. 


13. 


Amount paid in dividends, ... 


none. 


14. 


Paid to sinking fund, ... 


none. 


15. 


Surplus for the year, ... 


none. 


16. 


Surplus last year, ... 


none. 


17. 


Total surplus, - 


none. 



18. Surplus invested as follows : 
Cash and loans, 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, ... 



SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



203 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 



No accidents. 



Attest, J. DEMING PERKINS, President. 
Attest, H. R. COIT, Treasurer. 



State of Conecticut, ) 

County of Fairfield. \ 

January, 1873. 

Then personally appeared J. Deming Perkins, President, and 
Henry R. Coit, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the forego- 
ing return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their 
best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

GEORGE M. WOODRUFF, 

Notary Public. 



204 SHEPAUG VALLEY RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, J. DEMING PERKINS, Litchfield, Conn. 

Vice President, S. H. MITCHELL, Washington, Conn. 

Secretary, GEORGE M. WOODRUFF, Litchfield, Conn. 

Treasurer, H. R. COIT, Litchfield. Conn. 

Superintendent. A. W. GRUIG, Litchfield, Conn. 

General Ticket Agent, CHARLES H. PLATT, Litchfield, Conn. 

General Freight Agent, CHARLES H. PLATT, Litchfield, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

J. Dkming Perkins, Litchfield. Edwin McPeill, Litchfield. 
Henry R. Coit, Litchfield. Geo. M. Woodruff, Litchfield. 

Edward W. Seymour, Litch- Henry W. Buel, Litchfield. 

field. Frederick B. Hand, Litchfield. 

F. Ratciiford Starr, Phila Wm. Deming Morris. 

delphia. S. II. Mitchell, Washington. 

Seth S. Logan, Washington. George C. Hitchcock, Wash- 
Albert L. Hodge, Washington. ington. 



NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLIMAN- 
TIC 1UILROAD. 



Return of the New Haven, Middletown and Willimantic Railroad 
Company, for the year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act 
of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 4,510 

shares at par, - 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 

including towns and corporations, 

DEBTS. 

1 . Total amount of funded debt, - 



$6,000,000.00 

3,000,000.00 
677,500.00 

none. 



none. 

6,775.00 

100.00 

677,500.00 

none. 

16,346.00 
all. 

454,000.00 

33 



$2,770,000.00 



206 NEW HAVEN, MipDLETOWN AND WILLIMANTIC RAILROAD. 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?), 

f Rate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
t Rate of interest (what?) percent., 



1881. 
7 per cent. 
1882. 
7 per cent. 
All others describe in same manner, Second mortgage, 880,000.00 

2. Amount of floating debt, approximate, - - 1,459,118.01 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, ap- 

proximate, - - • - - 4,821,967.00 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 92,787.00 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item-to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering, including interest and 
commissions.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



$5,402,467.27 



103,701.00 

all. 

59,492.04 



2,700.00 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, 52 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 52 miles. 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - none. 

5. Total length of branches, ... none. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 

t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLIJMANTIC RAILROAD. 207 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), finished and operated, - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, - 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, --.-.. i 

19. Name of each, - Connecticut Valley. 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 4 way and 3 flag. 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - - all. 



1,500 ft. 
1,500 ft. 

22 miles. 
22 miles. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

653 ft. 

6,800 ft. 

20 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHKR COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, - 

23. Total length of all, 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this Compauy, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, 2 66,000 

2. * Number of passenger cars, average weight, 2 about 30,000 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, none. 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, 1 18,000 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, 22 



* Does not include stations on roads that arc leased. 



208 NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLI M ANTIC RAILROAD. 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those 

engaged in construction, ... 30 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger") 

trains when in motion, - >- none. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - - ) 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 24 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ..... none. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - .05c. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... - .05c. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, .03ic. 

4. General average rates, ... .04£c. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 32, 28, 20, 16c. 

6. Lowest contract rale of same per ton per mile, 

for through rates, for first, second, third and 

fourth classes, - - 1 1 £, 9|, 8, 7c, nearly. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - 21^, 19, 14, ll^c. 

DOINGS DURING THE TEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains, > .- „„.> 

2. * Miles run by freight trains, - - ) 

3. Miles run by other trains, ... none. 

4. Total miles run, - 55,932 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 68,540 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 1.095,948 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - - - - 628,084 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - - I3,020f 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile, - 201,252|- 
10. Tons of merchandise carried lo and from other 

roads, - 3,215-1 

* Freight and passenger trains run together. 



NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLIMANTIC RAILROAD. 209 



* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAK. 

1. Extension or alteration of road, eastern division 

incomplete,- .... uone- 

2. Land or land damages, - 24 079.72 

3. New buildings, - 

4. New rolling stock, 

5. Any other expenditure, 



6. Total, 



$24,079.72 



EXPENDITURES FOR. OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Waxj and Buildings. 



1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, - 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, 

6. Repairs offences, - 

7. Removing ice and snow, - 

8. Total for maintenance of way, 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$11,078.99 

none. 

none. 

none. 

22.50 

none. 

none. 

11,101.49 

504 

all. 



Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, ... 

2. Repairs of machinery, - 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 

4. Repairs of freight cars, - 



$2,259.87 

none. 

466.79 

none. 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading "Cost," this article only showing what 
Has been added during the year. 

27 



210 NEW HAVEN, MJDDLETOWN AND WILLIMANTIC RAILROAD. 



5. Cost of fuel, — wood and coal, — total, 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 

7. Waste and other material used for cleaning, 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, .... 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$7,018.03 
585.19 
247.05 

10,576.93 

480.00 

all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, ... 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, - - - charged 

4. Gratuities, - - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killtd, ... 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, - 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, ..... 

9. Taxes, ..... 

10. Insurance, ..... 

11. Telegraph expenses, ... 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

included in 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 



$5,159.60 

5,810.15 

in the above. 
25.00 
none* 
50.00 

21.25 

none. 
44.74 
none, 
none. 

not adjusted. 

4,958.63 



construction. 

16,072.37 

7.305.62 

all. 

87,750.79 



* Total amount of the three previous at tides. 



NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLTMANTIC RAILROAD. 211 



2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



1,715.00 
all. 



INCOME. 



3 
4 

5. 
6, 
7. 
8, 
9. 
10. 

11. 
12. 

13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 



. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, ..... 
To and from other roads, 
From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 
U. S. mails, .... 
Rents, - 
Expresses, - 

Total income, ... 

Income per mile of road operated, - 
Proportionate income for Connecticut, 
Income above operating expenses, 
Amount paid for interest, estimated paid and 

payable, .... 

Total net income, .... 

Number and per cent, dividends, - 
Amount paid in dividends, ... 
Paid to sinking fund, ... 
Surplus for the year, .... 
Surplus last year, ... 

Total surplus, - m 

Surplus iuvested as follows : 
Cash and loans, - 

Balance of accounts due the company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, - 



$18,982.82 



3,297.34 

719.42 

82.04 

2,474.23 

25,555.85 

1,160.00 

all. 

25,555.85 

320,000.00 
25,555.85 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



Above income all devoted to construction. 



12 NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WILLIMANTIC RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

Feb. 10, 1872. A. M. Dudley either fell or jumped off the 5.f>0 
p. m. up train near Middlefield Center station, and was considerably 
bruised. 

Feb. 14. Unknown man was found lying on the trestle at Cedar 
Hill bridge, was struck by locomotive and picked up insensible. Sub- 
sequently died of the injury. 

Sept. 10. John Rees, laborer, jumped from the train after it had 
started. Crushed one leg, which was amputated. 

Sept. 18. John O'Keefe, who was lying on the track, probably 
intoxicated, was struck by the 7.18 p. m. train, and killed. 

Attest, JULIUS HOTCHKISS, President. 
Attest, ALLYN M. COLEGROVE, Treasurer. 



} 



Statk of Connecticut, 

County of Middlesex 

January 8, 1873. 
Then personally appeared Julius Hotchkiss, President, and Allyn 
M. Colegrove, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the fore- 
going return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according 
to their best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

ROBERT G. PIKE, 

Commissioner of (he Superior Court for Middlesex County. 



NEW HAVEN, MIDDLETOWN AND WJLLIMANTIC RAILROAD. 213 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 

President, JULIUS HOTCHKISS, Middletown, Conn. 
Vice President, JOHN M. DOUGLAS, Middletown, Conn. 
Secretary, ROBERT G. PIKE, Middletown, Conn. 
Treasurer, ALLYN M. COLEGROVE, Middletown, Conn. 
Superintendent, j WJLLIAM A WATERBTJRY) Mid . 

General licket Agent, > 
General Freight Agent,) dletown > Co™- 

A. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Julius Hotchkiss, Middletown, John M. Douglas, Middletown, 
Conn. Conn. 

Robert G. Pike, Middletown, Charles C. Hubbard, Middle- 
Conn, town, Conn. 

Phineas W. Turner, Turner- N. Bradner Smith, Cobalt, Conn, 

ville, Conn. J. A. White, New York, N. Y. 

E. S. Mills, Brooklyn, N. Y. Henry Talmage, New York, N. Y. 

E. B. Litchfield, New York, Frederick Debillier, Yonkers, 
N. Y. N. Y. 

J. G. Schumacher, Brooklyn, John Perkins, New York, N. Y. 
N. Y. 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



Return of the New Canaan Railroad Company, for the year ending 
September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

*1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $200,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized b} r votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 164,050.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 164,050.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment lias 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock is>ued, - 8,281 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 50.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 164,050.00 

9. Total market value on the 30(h of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - estimated 16,405.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 20,506.25 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 2,710 shares. 

13. Number of Stockholders residing iu Connecticut, 206 

DEBTS. 



1. Total amount of funded debt, 



;86,971.86 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



215 



* Fii\-t mortgage bonds due (when?) 
|R:ite of interest, (what!'') percent., - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
fRate of interest (what ?) per cent, 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



10 years from 1868. 

7 per cent. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

83,847.21 

90,819.07 

11,352.38 

all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 
Proportion of same per mile of road, - 



8230,746.63 



o. 



6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



28,843.32 

all. 

26,343.00 



3,292.00 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



1 . Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) 

4. Name and length of branches, - 

5. Total length of branches, 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 



8^f| miles. 
8^| miles. 



none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



*On this- line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
t' e column. 
HJn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



216 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 1,920 ft. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 1,9 20' ft. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), - 8gf g- miles. 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, - - 8$$$ miles. 

11. Total length of double track, - - none. 
12 Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, - - none. 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, - 107 ft. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, - - none. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, - none. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, .... 10 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 

19. Name of each, - .... 

(None, except New York and New Haven 

Railroad at Stamford station on the way to steamboat binding.) 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

(4, and the Stamford station of New York 

and New Haven Railroad used by this company.) 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - '- all. 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED ISY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each, 

23. Total length of all, ... - 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this company, ... - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 



No. Weijdit in tons. 



1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, .... 2 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, 1 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, none. 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, none. 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, - none. 



about 26 
about 16 



* Does not include stations on roads that arc leased. 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 217 

6. Number of men employed exclusive of those en- 

gaged in construction, - 22 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, - = no express traing> 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - nothing. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 20 miles. 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion ' * - no freight trains. 



FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - - 71 c 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, ... fii 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 6*c. 

4. General average rates, - 6 t 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for 



first, second, third and fourth classes, 25c, 20c, 12^0. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for first, second, third, and fourth classes, 25c, 20c, 12±c, 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third, and fourth classes, - 25c, 20c, 1 2 i c 



DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 



1. Miles run by passenger trains, - ) 

2. Miles run by freight trains, - . / ™ n to S ether > 21,021 

3. Miles run by other trains, - . none 

4. Total miles run, - . . . 2 ] 021 

5. Number of passengers carried, - - 37 733 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, - 220^52 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, ... 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, - . . c avq 1 3 
». -ions ot merchandise carried one mile, - 40 723 4JL 

10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 
roads, .... 

28 * 



none. 



218 



NKW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE TEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, and fencing, 

3. New buildi 

4. New rolling stork, 



none. 
none. 

none, 
none. 



5. Any other expenditure, 
6. Total, 



electric signals for crossings, 






EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DUHIV; HIE TEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, ..... 265.18 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and a none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), 

4. Repairs of bridg ... none. 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 32.75 

6. Repairs of feno ... 2. no 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... none. 

8. Total for maintenance of way. - 2,29988 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 287. -18 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, - - all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Curs. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, - - - $1( 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... none. 
... ^Repairs of passenger, baggage, and mail i 35l 

4. Repairs of freight c ... none. 

5. Cost of fuel, — wood, coal, — wood, f 17.50 ; 

$8,572.22; total, .... 8,619.72 



•Tin' amount- under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," rhia article onlj showing wli.u has 
Im i ii added during the year. 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



219 



Waste and other material used for cleaning, 



G. Oil used by engines and cars, - 
7 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power 

and cars, «• - - 

9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



259.30 
113.53 

4,513.05 

564.13 

all 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, including car rent, 

2. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers, 

and watchmen, .... 

4. Gratuities, - 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - - - 

7. Damages for loss of* goods and baggage, 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire, 

9. Taxes, - 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

1 2. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, New York 
and New Haven railroad and depot facilities, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for pas- 

sengers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 
law expenses, - 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, 

1. * Total expenditure for operating the road, 

2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$5,7S0.21 



none. 

nothing. 

nothing. 

175.00 

22.30 

none. 

1,060.22 

167.50 

none. 



1,000 
nothing. 



200.00 

8,405.23 

1,05QM 

all. 

815,218.16 

1,902.14 

all. 



Total amount of the three previous articles. 



220 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



INCOME. 



1 . From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - - 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. Mails, 

4. Rents, -.-•_. 

5. Expresses, .... 

6. Total income, .... 

7. Income per mile of road operated, 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

9. Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, 

11. Total net income, - 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... 

15. Surplus for the year, ... 

1 6. Surplus last year, ... 

17. Total surplus, ----- 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 

Materials, fuel, and stores, 

Other items, .... 



11,421.61 
none. 



6,477.24 

none. 

392.00 

100.00 

100.00 

18,490.85 

2,311.35 

all. 

3,272.69 

6.188.00 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 



NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



221 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 



None. 



Attest, SAMUEL ST. JOHN, President. 
Attest, WILLIAM ST. JOHN, Treasurer. 



State of Connecticut, ") 
County of Fairfield. ) 

November 27, 1872. 
Then personally appeared Samuel St. John, President, and Wil- 
liam St. John, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by tbem subscribed, is true and correct, according to their best 
knowledge and belief. Before me, 

NOAH W. HOYT, 

- Notary Public. 



222 NEW CANAAN RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, SAMUEL ST. JOHN, New Canaan, Conn. 

Vice President, JOSEPH B. HOYT, Stamford, Conn. 

Secretary, NOAH W. HOYT, New Canaan, Conn. 

Treasurer, WILLIAM ST. JOHN, New Canaan, Conn. 

Superintendent, SAMUEL ST. JOHN, New Canaan. 

Assistant Superintendent, WILLIAM ST. JOHN, New Canaan, 
Conn. 

General Ticket Agent, FRANCIS E. WEED, New Canaan, Conn. 

General Freight Agent, FRANCIS E. WEED, New Canaan, 
Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Samuel St. John, New Canaan, Selleck Y. St. John, New 
Conn. • Canaan, Conn. 

Andrew K. Comstock, New Albert S. Comstock, New 
Canaan, Conn. Canaan, Conn. 

William G. Webb, New Canaan, Stephen Hoyt, New Canaan, 
Conn. Conn. 

Joseph B. Hott, Stamford, Conn. Joseph D. Warren, Stamford, 

Willard Parker, New York. Conn. 



WATERTOWN AND WATERBDRY RAILROAD. 



Return of the Watertown and Waterbury Railroad Company, for 
the year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capilal stock authorized by charter, - $150,000.00 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - 130,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, - - 118,200.00 

4. Capital Stock issued lor earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, - - - - - none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 2,364, at $50 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 50.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 118,200.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, ... - no value. 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, - - 33,333.33 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, all. 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, all. 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 52 

di:bts. 



] . Total amount of funded debt, 



$17,000.00 



all. 



224 WATERTOWN AND WATERBURY RAILROAD. 

* First mortgage bonds due (when?), 15 years from Nov. 1, 1870. 
t Rate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - - 7 per cent. 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) - none. 
t Rate of interest (what?) percent., 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, none - 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, all funded. 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 3,777.77 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - - $135,000.00 

(This item to include, grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and . 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 30,000.00 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all. 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, no equipment whatever. 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - 4-^ miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - all. 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), none. 

4. Name and length of branches, - - - none. 

5. Total length of brauehes, ... none. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 

t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



WATERTOWN AND WATERBURY RAILROAD. 



225 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, - 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

1 6. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, ... 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 

19. Name of each, - 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, 



1,300 ft. 


1,300 ft. 


4-^j miles. 


4-^y miles. 


none. 


none. 


none. 


about 165 ft. 


none. 


none. 



none. 

none 

3 

all. 



* Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



29 



226 WATERTOWN AND WATERBURY RAILROAD. 



This road when completed was immediately leased to the Nauga- 
tuck Railroad Company, for the gross receipts, and is managed en- 
tirely by it in respect to " Motive Power and Cars," " Fares and 
Freights," " Doings," " Receipts," and " Expenditures." 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

No accidents. 

Attest, 0. B. KING, President. 

Attest, LEMAN W. CUTLER, Treasurer. 



I 



State of Conecticdt, 

County of Litchfield. „ 

October 12, 1872. 

Then personally appeared Owen B. King, President, and Leman 
W. Cutler, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the foregoing 
return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to their 
best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

C. H. HOTCHKISS, 

Justice of the Peace. 



WATERTOWN AND WATERBURY RAILROAD. 227 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, OWEN B. KING, Watertown, Conn. 
Secretary, LEMAN W. CUTLER, Watertown, Conn. 
Treasurer, LEMAN W. CUTLER, Watertown, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Owen B. King, Watertown. Leman W. Cdtler, Watertown. 

Charles A. Warren, Water- Eli Curtiss, Watertown. 

town. George A. Woodruff, Water- 
Caleb T. Hickox, Watertown. town. 

M. Hemming way, Watertown. George W. Beach, Waterbury. 

Henry Merriman, Waterbury. Wm. E. Curtiss, New York city. 



ROCKVILLE RAILROAD. 



Return of the Rockville Railroad Company, for the year ending 
September 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $100,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 100,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, common stock, 

$68,750.00 ; preferred stock, $29,000.00 ; 

total, ----- 97,750.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, - 977 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 97,750.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock is-ued, common, 1 per cent., 

preferred, 40 per c nt., - - - 12,287.00 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, - 20,332.00 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, all. 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - all. 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 44 

DKBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - - - $36,000.00 



ROCKVILLE RAILROAD. 



229 



* First mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
fRate of interest, (what?) percent., 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
fRate of interest (what ?) per cent, 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



1883. 

7 percent. 

none. 

none. 



$36,000.00 

7,488 

all. 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, - - $144,247. 66 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 29,789.23 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - all. 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, - - 28,857.99 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not ' 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 6,002.47 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



1. Total length of main line of road, 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) 

4. Name and length of branches, - 

5. Total length of branches, 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 



4-^j miles. 
4^ miles. 



none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
tbe column. 
tOn this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 



230 



ROCKVILLE RAILROAD. 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, ... 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road, (single 

track miles), .... 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, 
12 Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, .... 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, .... 

19. Name of each, - - 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, - 



$ of a mile. 
| of a mile. 



4-1^ miles. 
4^ miles. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

65 ft. 

none. 

none. 



none. 



INCOME. 



1. From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. mails, - 

4. Rents, ----- 

5. Expresses, - - - - - 

6. Total income, 

7. Income per mile of road operated, 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

9. t Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, 

11. Total net income, 



none, 
none. 



none. 

none. 

none. 

noue. 

none 
from leases, 5,756.76 
1,151.35 
5,756.76 
3,803.80 
1,657.50 
2,146.30 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 

i The expenses to this company for grading, repairs, taxes, insurance and sala- 
ries were $1,952.96. 



ROCKVILLE RAILROAD. 231 

2. Number and per cent, dividends, 

one of 4 per cent, on preferred stock. 

13. Amount paid in dividends, - 1,112.00 

14. Paid to sinking fund, - - - none. 

15. Surplus for the year, ... - 1,034.30 

16. Surplus last year, ... none. 

17. Total surplus, ----- 1,034.30 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, on hand Sept. 30, - 2,07 G.l 5 
Balance of accounts due the company, 
Materials, fuel, and stores, 
Other items, - 



232 ROCKVILLE RAILROAD. 



The items called for under the headings " Motive Power and 
Cars," " Fares and Freight," " Doings during the Year," and " Ex- 
penditures for Operating," are included in the returns of the Hart- 
ford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad Company, to which this road 
is leased, and by whom it is operated. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

.Reported by Hartford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad Com- 
pany. 

Attest, JAMES J. ROBINSON, President. 
Attest, A. PARK HAMMOND, Treasurer. 



State op Connecticut, ) 
County of Tolland. j 

February 4, 1873. 
Then personally appeared James J. Robinson, President, and 
A. Park Hammond, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the 
foregoing return by-them subscribed, is true and correct, according 
to their best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

JOHN H. KITE, 

Notary Public. 



UOCKVJLLh; HAILROAD. 233 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, JAMES J. ROBINSON, Rockville, Conn. 
Vice President, None. 

Secretary, A. PARK HAMMOND, Rockville, Conn. 
Treasurer, A. PARK HAMMOND, Rockville, Conn. 
Superintendent, A. H. PUTNAM, Rockville, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

J. J. Robinson, Rockville, George Maxwell, Rockville, 

Conn. Conn. 

S. D. W. Harris Rockville, A. Park Hammond, Rockville, 

Conn. Conn. 

Frank Grant, Rockville, Conn. 



30 



SOUTH MANCHESTER RAILROAD. 



Return of the South Manchester Railroad Company, for the year 
ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



$40,000.00 

40,00000 
40,000.00 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has bem made, either in ca^h or its equiva- 
lent, - 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - nominally nothing, 

10. Amount ol Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



none. 

400 

100.00 

40,000.00 

none in market. 

17,777.78 

40,000.00 

40,000.00 

9 



DEBTS. 



I. Total amount of funded debt, 



SOUTH MANCHESTER RAILROAD. 



235 



* First mortgage bonds clue (when?), 

t Rate of interest, (what ?) per cent., - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) 
t Rate of interest (what?) percent., 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



none. 



COST. 



1 . Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 



$67,000.00 



Proportion of same per mile of road, - « 

Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

{ Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

Proportion of same per mile of road, - 

Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 



29,777.78 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 



1. Total length of main line of road, - r 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), 

4. Name and length of branches, - 

5. Total length of branches, 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, 



2£ miles. 
2£ miles. 



none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



* On this line state when the honds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column. 

t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 
t Furnished by Hartford, Providence and Fishkill Railroad Company. 



236 



SOUTH MANCHESTER RAILROAD. 



7. Aggregate length of sidings, ... 

8. Length of same in Connecticut, 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single 

track miles), - 

10. Length of same in Connecticut, 

11. Total length of double track, - 

12. Length of same in Connecticut, 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in 

Connecticut, .... 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut, - 

19. Name of each, .... 

20. * Total number of stations on the entire road, 

21. Number of same in Connecticut, 



1,500 ft. 
1,500 ft. 

2\ miles. 
2\ miles. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 



none. 

none. 
1 
1 



*Does not include stations on roads that are leased. 



SOUTH MANCHESTER RAILROAD. 



237 



This road is leased to the Hartford, Providence and Fi?hkill Rail- 
road Company, for the proceeds, and all business concerning '• Motive 
Power and Cars," " Fares and Freights," " Doings during the Year," 
'' Expenditures" and " Income," is arranged by that company. 

Attest, F. W. CHENEY, President. 
Attest, C. S. CHENEY, Treasurer. 



State op Connecticut, ) 
County op Hartford. ) 

South Manchester, October 23, 1872. 
Then personally appeared Frank W. Cheney, President, and 
Charles S. Cheney, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the 
foregoing return by them subscribed is true and correct, according 
to their best knowledge and belief. Before me, 



RICHARD 0. CHENEY, 

Notary Public. 



238 SOUTH MANCHESTER RAILROAD. 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, FRANK W. CHENEY, Hartford, Conn. 

Secretary, RICHARD 0. CHENEY, South Manchester, Conn. 

Treasurer, CHARLES S. CHENEY, South Manchester, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Ralph Cheney, South Manches'- Rush Cheney, South Manches- 
ter, Conn. ter, Conn. 

Frank Cheney, South Manches- Frank W. Cheney, Hartford, 
ter, Conn. Conn. 

Richard O. Cheney, South Man- 
chester, Conn. 



NEW FORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN 
RAILROAD, 

Return of the New York, Housatonic and Northern Railroad Com- 
pany, for the year ending September 30th, 1872, under the act of 
1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital Stock authorized by charter, - - $3,000,000.00 

2. Capital Stock authorized by votes of the com- 

pany, ----- 3,000,000.00 

3. Capital Stock actually paid in, 261,000.00 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had 

not been divided among the stockholders, - none. 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment has 

been made either in cash or its equivalent, none. 

6. * Total number of shares of Stock is.-ued, - 2,160 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, - 100.00 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, - - 216,000.00 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, 

of the Stock issued, - - - no market value. 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of 

railroad owned by the company, being that 

wholly and partly built, 23 miles, - - 8,956.52 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, t, 6 3 - 

12. Amount of Stock held in Connecticut, - 42,800 

13. Number of Stockholders residing in Connecticut, 42 



* The " stock issued" as reported above is only that which has been fully paid 
lor, and tor which certificates have been given. There is a large amount addi- 
tional which has been subscribed and partly paid for, which is not yet issued. 



240 NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 

DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt, - - - $183,500.00 

* First mortgage bonds due (when?) October 1, 1902. 
t Rate of interest, (what?) percent., - - 7 per cent. gold. 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when ?) none, 
t Rate of interest (what?) per cent, - - none. 

All others describe in same manner, no other. 

2. Amount of floating debt, - - 150,475.47 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, - 339,975.47 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, - 5,666.25 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - - J§ 



COST. 



1. Total cost of entire road to date, 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road finished, - 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



$603,626.61 



10,060.45 

if 
12,737.17 



2,374.28 
all. 



CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - - about 60 miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - 15 ^ G G miles. 

3. Length of the same in other States, (giving the 

names of States and length in each,) 44 -j^ 

miles in the state of New York. 
1. Name and length of branches, - ' - - none. 

5. Total length of branches, ... none. 

6. Length of same in Connecticut, - - none. 

*On tHis line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same in 
the column. 

tOn this line give the rate ofintercst paid ou the bonds next previous. 



NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 241 



10. 
11. 

12 
13. 
14. 
15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 
2D. 
21. 



Aggregate length of sidings, 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of track for the entire road, (single 
track miles), - - -5 ^% 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Total length of double track, 

Length of same in Connecticut, 

Miles of track laid with steel rails, 

Aggregate length of wooden bridges, 

Aggregate length of iron bridges, 

Aggregate length of stone arch bridges, 

Number of public highways crossed at grade in 
Connecticut, - 

Number of railroads crossed at grade in Con- 
necticut, .... 

Name of each, - 

* Total number of stations on the entire road, 

Number of same in Connecticut, - 



no data. 
no data. 

miles finished. * 

5 i 3 o 6 omile-;. 

none. 

none. 

none. 

1—172 ft. 

none. 

2—50 ft. 



none. 

none, 
(finished) 2 
(finished; 2 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES, OPERATED BY THE 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 



22. Name, termini, and length of each, - 

23. Total length of all, 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut, 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated 

by this Company, - 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut, 



none. 



MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

No. Weight in lbs. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender 

full, - - - - - 1 22,000 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight, none. 

3. Number of merchandise cars, average weight, none. 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight, none. 

5. Number of gravel and other cars, - none. 



* A little over 17 miles more in New York partly completed, 
HI 



242 NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



6. Number of men employed exclusive of those I 



engaged in construction, 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger 

trains when in motion, 

8. Average rate of same, including stops, - 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains, 
10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains in 

motion, ----- 



y 



f FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for dis- 

tances less than three miles, - none. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than 

three miles, .... none. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers, 10c. 

4. General average rates, ... lOc. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile, for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, 12, 10, 7c, special SI per car. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile, 

for through rates, for first, second, third and 

fourth classes, ... none. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes, - no data. 

■DOINGS DURING FIVE MONTHS. i 



1. Miles run by passenger trains, - 

2. Miles run by freight trains, 

3. Miles run by other trains, 

4. Total miles run, - 

5. Number of passengers carried, 

6. Number of passengers carried one mile, 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and 

from other roads, - - - - 

8. Tons of merchandise carried, 



mixed trains, 4,175 

4,175 

3,239 

- 17,361 



. 17,361 
807 



* The road 1ms been operated by the Honsatonic Railroad Company since 
March i, 1872, and we have no data as to above questions 6 to 10. 

IN. 15. — The above applies only to the period between September 30, 
1871, and March 1, 1872, when the Honsatonic Railroad Company began oper- 
ating the road under lea 



NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 243 

9. Tons ol' merchandise carried one mile, - 4,325 -{'fa 

10. Tons of merchandise carried to and from other 

roads, - - - - - 4,325-j^ 

* EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE YEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road, 

2. Land or land damages, 

3. New buildings, 

4. New rolling stock, 

5. Any other expenditure, 

6. Total, ... 



$138,937 74 

13,967.84 

2,250.92 

none. 

none. 

$155,156.50 



EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING FIVE MONTHS. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road exclusive of bridges and new 

rails, $1,591.73 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost), - none. 

4. Repairs of bridges, ... none. 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures, - - 65.44 

6. Repairs offences, - none. 

7. Removing ice and snow, ... none. 

8. Total for maintenance of way, - 1,657.17 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair, 309.17 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, all. 

Cost of Maintenance of Motive Power and Cars. 

1. Repairs of locomotives, ... $280.95 

2. Repairs of machinery, ... nothing. 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars, 4.10 

4. Repairs of freight cars, ... nothing. 



* The amounts under this heading are also included in the permanent cost of 
road or equipment under the heading " Cost," this article only showing what 
has been added daring the year. 



244 NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



5. Cost of fuel, — wood and coal, — total, 

6. Oil used by engines and cars, - 

7. Waste and other material u-ed for cleaning, 

8 Total for maintenance of motive power 
and cars, .... 
9. Cost per mile of road operated, 
10. Proportion for Connecticut, 



$941.55 
89.43 

1,316.03 

245.52 

all. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1. Salaries, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

passenger department, ... 

2. Salarii-s, wages, and incidentals, chargeable to 

freight department, - - - 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal men, gate keepers 

and watchmen, 

4. Gratuities, ----- 

5. Damages for injuries to persons, 

6. Damages for cattle killed, - 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage, • 

8. Damages to property, including damages by 

fire, - 

9. Taxes, ----- 

10. Insurance, - 

11. Telegraph expenses, - 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of 

road, specifying each company, 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passen- 

gers and freight, specifying each company, 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law ex- 

penses, and all other expenses (except inter- 
est), not included in any of the above items, 

15. Total miscellaneous, 

16. Amount per mile of road operated, 

17. Proportion for Connecticut, - 

1. f Total expenditure for operating the road, 



)■ *$1,461.74 



262.51 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 

none. 

241.77 

none. 

none. 

none. 

nane. 



none. 

1,965.42 

367.05 

1,965.42 

4,938.62 



* Not separated. 

t Total amount of the three previous articles. 



NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 245 



2. Total cost per mile of road operated, 

3. Proportionate total for Connecticut, 



$921.74 
4,938.62 



INCOME. 

1 . From passengers : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - - 
To and from other roads, 

2. From freight : 

On main road and branches owned by Com- 
pany, - 
To and from other roads, 

3. U. S. Mails, 

4. Rents, - 

5. Expresses, .... 

6. Total income, - 

7. Income per mile of road operated, 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut, 

9. Income above operating expenses, 

10. Amount paid for interest, 

11. * Total net income, - 

12. Number and per cent, dividends, - 

13. Amount paid in dividends, 

14. Paid to sinking fund, ... 

15. Surplus for the year, - 

16. Surplus last year, - 

17. Total surplus, - 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans, - 

Balance of accounts due the Company, 

Materials, fuel, and stores, 

Other items, - 



2,623.01 



2,839.96 

none. 

none. 

none. 

5,462.97 

1,019.21 

5,462.97 

524.35 



* Income expended in construction. 



246 NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 



STATEMENT OF EACH ACCIDENT. 

No accidents. 

Attest, DAVID S. DUN COMB, Vice President. 
Attest, SEWELL SERGEANT, Treasurer. 



Countt of New York 



.} 



State of New York, 

)RK. j" 

February 24, 1873. 
Then personally appeared David S. Duncomb, Vice President, 
and Sewell Sergeant, Treasurer, and severally made oath that the 
foregoing return by them subscribed, is true and correct, according to 
their best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

C. S. DELAVAN, 

Notary Public. 



NEW YORK, HOUSATONIC AND NORTHERN RAILROAD. 247 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 



OFFICERS. 

President, LOUIS D. RUCKER, New York city. 
Vice President, DAVID S. DUNCOMB, New York city. 
Secretary, SEWALL SERGEANT, New York city. 
Treasurer, SEWALL SERGEANT, New York city. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Louis D. Rucker, New York David S. Duncomb, New York 

ciiy, city. 

George W. Mead, Brooklyn, Leonard D. White, New York 

N. Y. city. 

Erastus F. Mead, New York Harrison Hall, New York city. 

city. Charles D. Bailey, New York 

Thomas Clark, Jr., Brooklyn, city, 

N. Y. William Raynor, Brooklyn, 

Walter Keeler, North Salem, N. Y. 

N. Y. Joseph Benedict, South Salem, 

Erastus Bouton, South Salem, N. Y. 

N. Y. Silas D. Mead, Greenwich, Ct. 



RIDGEFIELD AND NEW YORK RAILROAD. 



Return of the Ridgefield and New York Railroad Company, for 
the year ending Sept. 30th, 1872, under the act of 1872. 



CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter, 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the Com- 

pany, - - • 

3. * Capital Stock actually paid in,- - 

4. Capital Stock issued for earnings which had not 

been divided among the stockholders, 

5. Capital Stock issued upon which no payment 

has been made, either in cash or its equiva- 
lent, ..... 

6. Total number of shares of Stock issued, 

7. Par value per share of Capital Stock, 

8. Total par value of Stock issued, 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September, of 

the Stock issued, - 

10. Amount of Capital Stock issued per mile of rail- 

road owned by the company, 

11. Proportion of Stock issued for Connecticut, 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut, 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut, 



81,250,000.00 

1,250,000 00 
155,680.00 

none. 



none. 

3,833 

50.00 

191,650.00 

no value. 

8,322 

2,398 shares. 

119,900.00 

108 



DEBTS. 

1 . Total amount of funded debt, - 



none. 



* The difference in capital stock paid in and capital stock issued is in conse- 
quence of 768 shares of stock of delinquent subscribers being sold at public auc- 
tion according to law, which brought only $2,430. 



RIDGEFIELD AND NEW TORE RAILROAD. 



249 



* First mortgage bonds due (when?), 
fRate of interest, (what?) per cent, - 

* Second mortgage bonds due (when?) 
fRate of interest (what?) percent., 

All others describe in same manner, 

2. Amount of floating debt, 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt, 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut, 



none. 



COST. 

1. Total cost of entire road to date, - - $170,000.00 

(This item to include grading and masonry, 
bridging, superstructure, land damages and 
fences, stations, engine and car houses, and 
cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road, - - 7,391.00 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 118,256.00 

4. Total cost of entire equipment, no equipment. 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, ma- 
chinery, and tools, and machine shops, not 
included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road, 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut, - 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road, - - 23^^ miles. 

2. Length of the same in Connecticut, - l^Vo" miles. 

3. Length of the same in other states (giving the 

names of states and length in each), New York, 7 j 3 ^ miles. 



*On this line state when the bonds became due, and the amount of the same 
in the column, 
t On this line give the rate of interest paid on the bonds next previous. 

32 



250 RIDGEFIELD AND NEW YORK RAILROAD. 



This road being in process of construction and no part completed, 
no further statistics can be given. 

Attest, ELLWOOD BURDSALL, President. 
Attest, HIRAM K. SCOTT, Treasurer. 



State of New York, ) 

County of "Westchester. } 

November 29, 1872. 

Then personally appeared Ellwood Burd.-all, President, and 
made oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and 
correct, according to bis best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

JOHN E. MARSHALL, 

Notary Public. 

State of Connecticut, ) 
County of Fairfield. ) 

Ridgefiei.d, November 2G, 1872. 
Then personally appeared Hiram K. Scott, Treasurer, and made 
oath that the foregoing return by him subscribed, is true and 
correct, according to his best knowledge and belief. Before me, 

ELIJAH L. THOMAS, 

Justice of the Peace. 



EIDGEFIELD AND NEW YORK RAILROAD. 



251 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

OFFICERS. 

President, ELTTOOD BURDSALL, Portcliestcr, N. T. 
Vice President, "WILLIAM J. MEAD, Greenwich, Conn. 
Secretary, EPHRAIM SOURS, Portchcster, N. Y. 
Treasurer, ILIRAM K. SCOTT, Ridgefield, Conn. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Edavard Bcrdsall, Portchcs- Wit. P. Ahexdrotii, Portclies- 
tcr, N. Y. tcr, X. Y. 

Epuraim Sours, Portchester, Peter P. Corxen, Ridgefield, 
X. Y. Conn. 

D. L. Adams, Ridgefield, Conn. H. K. Scott, Ridgefield, Conn. 

Henry Keeler, South Salem, Floyd T. Palmer, Long Ridge, 
N. Y. Conn. 

Setii S. Cook, Long Ridge, William J. Mead, Greenwich, 
Conn. Conn. 

PnixEAs C. "Wrigiit, No. 90 ' Haxford Lockwood, Green- 
E-roadway, New York city. wich, Conn. 



LAWS 



RELATING TO 



RAILROADS. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



OF RAILROADS OPERATED BY STEAM. 

Sect. 443. All railroad companies that have Ra *f r 4 9 ad C0 J a . 
been, or shall be incorporated, under the authority ni<» to be g0 v- 
of this state, except railroad companies which ^Som of tws pr °" 
transport passengers or freight on their roads by act,exce,jt ' &c ' 
animal power alone, shall have all the powers and 
privileges, and be subjected to all the duties, lia- 
bilities, and other provisions, contained in the one 
hundred and three succeeding sections of this act, 
respecting such companies, except when otherwise 
specially provided in their charters. 

Sect. 444. The immediate government and organization of 
direction of the affairs, of every such company, ^ r c j °Y c any ' of " 
shall be vested in a board of not less than nine 
directors, who shall be annually chosen by the 
company, in the manner hereinafter provided, and 
shall hold their offices until others shall be duly 
elected in their places; and the said directors 
shall elect one of their own number president of 
the board, who shall also be president of the com- 
pany, and they may also choose a clerk, or secre- 
tary, who shall also be clerk and secretary of the 
company, and who shall be sworn to a faithful 
discharge of his duty, and a treasurer who shall 
give bonds to the company in such sums as shall 
be required by the by-laws, for the faithful dis- 
charge of his trust. 

Sect. 445. No person who is president or vice-p^^ 3 ,;,.^. 
president of any railroad comnany, situated wholly pp»went ofcom- 

—•j.1 .i • / . i • * , ■ . puny out of state 

Avithout this state, having a corporate existence, noteiigiMe to 
and a board of officers, distinct from, and uncon- ^ il ^ t ° e ffice in 



256 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

nected with, any railroad situated in and incorpo- 
rated by the laws of this state, shall be eligible to, 
or hold the office of, president or vice-president of 
any railroad company, situated in whole or in part 
in this state, and incorporated in whole or in part 
by the laws thereof, 
supervision over Sect. 4-16. The president and directors of every 
manageui i o ra ;] roac ] company shall maintain by its president 
or vice-president, or by an executive committee 
of the directors, a watchful supervision over the 
management of its road. 
Meetings 9 'now Sect. 447. All meetings of the company shall 
called. be called and notified in such manner as shall be 

provided in the by-laws, and at such meetings 
each member shall be entitled to one vote for each 
share held by him. 
1352- Sect. 448. No person shall be entitled to vote, 

reE°uiateu\ ,ng at any meeting of the stockholders in any railroad 
company, by virtue of any proxy or power of attor- 
ney, unless the same shall have been executed 
within twelve months immediately preceding such 
meeting ; and no sucli proxy or power of attorney 
shall be used at more than one annual meeting 
of said stockholders. 
p r =-<ie S5 ^'& Sect. 449. Every railroad company in this state, 

or railroad com- at a meeting of its stockholders, may prohibit its 
on'stock'of'otrier officers from voting in the election of directors for 
person. such company upon any other stock than their 

own ; and no officer of such company shall request 
or solicit any stockholder to execute a power of 
attorney to any person whatever, to vote upon the 
stock of such railroad company ; and no person 
shall be allowed to vote by virtue of a power so 
penalty. obtained ; and any person who shall violate the 

provisions of this section shall be disqualified from 
holding any office in said railroad company for the 
term of one year thereafter. 
1864. Sect. 450. No railroad contractor or stock- 

tmto^o < r°Btock- holder in any railroad company shall be allowed 
yo!e e on s "ock, not t0 vote on &n 7 stock subscribed for by him, to be 
when - paid in work or materials, unless he shall have 

paid in full, in the manner agreed, all assessments 
or installments, legally called by such company, 
on said stock, 
subscribers may Sect. 451. No subscriber to the capital stock 

not vote on stock „ ., , 1111 11 j j. l 

unless assess- of any railroad company shall be allowed to vote 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 257 

on any of said stock, unless all assessments or in- ""una fun' "" 
stallments, legally called by such company, shall 
have been paid in full. 

Sect. 452. The shares in the capital stock of s,^,.^ 1 ^ 9 ,' tock 
any railroad company shall be deemed personal to be personal es- 
estate and may be transferred by any conveyance ferabie. 
in writing, registered either by the treasurer in 
books to be kept in his office, or by the secretary, 
clerk, or other officer duly authorized by the 
directors, in books to be kept at such other place 
as they may appoint ; and no conveyance of any 
such shares shall be valid against any other person 
than the grantor or his representatives, unless so 
registered. 

Sect. 453. The president and directors of^reshTwmTue 
every railroad company may, from time to time, aQdcollecl;ed - 
make such equal assessment on all the shares in 
said company as tbey may deem expedient and 
necessary for the purposes of the company, and 
may direct the same to be paid to the treasurer in 
such manner, and with such notice as may be pre- 
scribed by the by-laws of said company ; and if 
any stockholder shall neglect to pay bis assessment 
for the space of thirty days after notice from the 
treasurer, the directors may order the treasurer, 
after giving notice of the sale, to sell sucli shares 
at public auction to the highest bidder, and the 
same shall accordingly be transferred to the pur- 
chaser ; and if the shares of any delinquent stock- 
holder shall not sell for a sum sufficient to pay his 
assessment, with interest and charges of sale, he 
shall be liable to the company for any deficiency ; 
and if any such shares shall sell for more than the 
assessment so due, with interest and charges of 
sale, he shall be entitled to the surplus remaining 
after such sale ; but no assessment shall be laid 
upon any shares in such company, to a greater 
amount than the sum at which the shares shall be 
fixed by the charter of such company.* 

Sect. 454. There shall be three persons ap- 1853. 1865. 
pointed by the general assembly, to be styled rail-u^^e^T/ow 
road commissioners, each of whom shall hold his Sg^^n!^ 
office for three years, and until his successor is andwhoBhau ' 

• Where no by-law prescribes mode of notice of assessment, directors may pre- 
scribe. Daabury and Norwalfc Railroad Co. v. Wilson, 22 c. r. 435. 
33 



To take oath. 



258 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

°° t D be s commie - appointed and qualified, except when he shall be 
appointed to fill a vacancy, and the appointment 
shall be so arranged that one vacancy shall occur 
and one new appointment shall be made every 
year, but any person going out of office may be 
reappointed ; and the governor may fill all vacan- 
cies that may occur during the recess of the gen- 
eral assembly, and the commissioner or commis- 
sioners, appointed by him shall hold office until 
the next session of the general assembly ; but no 
person, being at the time a director, superintend- 
ent, or stockholder, of any railroad company in 
tbis state, shall be appointed as such commissioner, 
and whenever any such commissioner shall be, 
directly or indirectly, in any way employed by any 
railroad company in this state, his office shall be- 
come vacant. 
y^-ix. Sect. 455. Before entering on the duties of 

their office, the railroad commissioners shall make 
oath that they will faithfully and impartially dis- 
charge all the duties incumbent upon them in their 
said office, agreeably to the constitution and laws 
and according to their best abilities and under- 
standing ; a certified copy of which oath they shall 
within thirty days thereafter, cause to be filed in 
the office of the secretary of this state. 

Record of com- Sect. 456. The railroad commissioners shall 

plaints, &c, to . -. . ,. . . 

be kept by com- make and keep a record of all complaints, or other 
papers, addressed to them officially, and of all their 
official acts and proceedings, and of all facts learned 
in relation to any casualty, and the names of the 
persons from whom derived, or by whom they may 

May employ ex- be proved ; and they may, on special occasions, 
employ experts, or other agents, whose services 
they may deem to be temporarily of importance. 

to pass free on Sect. 457. The railroad commissioners shall 

railroads when , ,1 . ■, , ,. . « <• 1 ,i 

on duty. have the right of passing, free of charge, in the 

performance of their duties, on all the railroads in 

the state, and to take with them any person in 

their official employment. 

1862. Sect. 458. The railroad commissioners shall 

whom a paid. y De entitled to charge and receive for their services, 
at the rate of three dollars a day for the time act- 
ually employed, and all reasonable expenses, for 
the examinations of the several railroads in this 
state, provided in the four hundred and sixty-sec- 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 259 

oiid section of this act, which shall be apportioned 
among the several railroad companies in this 
slate, in proportion to the length of main track or 
tracks of the respective railroads in operation 
within the limits of this state. 

In addition, July 19th, 1867. 

Sect. 1. That section four hundred and fifty- r c 2a"?om- n 
eight of the Act concerning Communities and Cor- missioners - 
porations, be, and the same is hereby amended so 
that the compensation of 1 lie railroad commission- 
ers shall be five dollars per day for the time actu- 
ally expended in the performance of their duties, 
instead of three dollars per day, as is now provided 
in said section. And that a thorough examina- Examination of 
tion of the condition of the track, road bed, n ^ d r e oads ' how 
bridges, and masonry, of each of the railroads in 
this state may be made ; it shall be, and is hereby 
made the duty of the railroad commissioners in 
each examination of the several railroads by them 
made to pass over the same at a rate of speed not 
exceeding six miles per hour, and to stop at each 
culvert, bridge, and piling, and make a personal 
examination of the same; and they shall examine 
the rails and ties at some point in each and every 
mile, and shall make sucli rules and order such 
repairs as, upon such examination, they shall deem 
the public good demands. 

Sect. 2. The said railroad commissioners are Piatformand 
hereby empowered, and it shall be their duty to depot U s'. ld ' ngsat 
make such rules and regulations in regard to the 
platforms and all outbuildings at the several rail- 
road stations and depots in this state as shall, in 
their judgment be expedient and for the interest 
of the public. 

Sect. 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent Repeal, 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 459. Whenever, in the opinion of the ^, pecia ' s -" ices 

. . I . ol commissioners 

railroad commissioners, special services are t0 b e paid by the 

i t ■■ , , Mi corporation re- 

required and rendered to any railroad com- quiring them, 
pany, or whenever any special services are re- 
quested by it, the fees and expenses of the com- 
missioners for such special services, after being 
audited and allowed as hereinafter provided, shall 
be paid by the company or companies for whose 
special or particular benefit the services were ren- 
dered. 



260 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



rt?c n „u,,l rail " • Se ct. 460. The railroad commissioners shall, 
au'iil^'-ma ap . m tlle montn of J»b', annually, present to the 
portioned. secretary, treasurer, and comptroller of public ac- 
counts, their respective accounts in detail, of their 
fees and expenses as such commissioners, for the 
year preceding the fourth day of July in each 
year, distinguishing the services and expenses for 
the general examination from the special services 
and expenses as provided in the preceding section, 
which accounts shall he verified, supported, and 
proved, by their oath; and the secretary, treasu- 
rer, and comptroller, shall examine and audit 
such accounts, and when said accounts are audited 
and allowed by them, the comptroller shall appor- 
tion the sums so allowed to he paid hy the several 
companies ; and the rule of apportionment shall 
he, to divide the fees and expenses of the general 
examinations among the several companies, in 
proportion to the length of the main track or 
tracks of the respective railroads within the limits 
of this state; and the fees or expenses incurred 
for any one or more companies, shall be assessed 
to and upon the particular company for whose 
benefit, or at whose request the same accrued ; 
and each company, and the trustees, assignees, 
lessees, or other parties, operating any road, 
shall pay the railroad commissioners their propor- 
tion of the general account, and also the amount 
assessed and charged against it for special services 
and expenses. 

An Act in Addition. 
Railroad com- Sect. 1. The railroad commissioners shall, in 

missioners to 

render semi-an- the months ol July and January, present to the 
nuai accounts. seci . etar y^ treasurer, afrd comptroller of public ac- 
counts, their respective accounts in detail of their 
fees and expenses as-such commissioners, for the 
six months next preceding the fourth day of Jan- 
uary, and the fourth day of July in each year. 
Repeal. Sect. 2. So much of any act now in force as is 

inconsistent with the provisions of this act is 
hereby repealed. 

Approved, July 27th, 1871. 

No compensation Sect. 461. No railroad commissioner shall ask, 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 261 

demand, or receive, from any railroad company ^services be- 
any money or other compensation whatever, for t&S^!** 
services rendered or expenses incurred in his offi- 
cial capacity, until the account for such services 
and expenses are audited and allowed, as pro- 
vided in the next preceding section. 

Sect. 462. The railroad commissioners shall, at 1*50. 
least twice in each year, examine the several rail- sffiLSSt 
loads in tins state, and make a like examination of rai,roads , twicea 
any railroad within the limits of any town when °™™Xh*n h ' 
thereto requested, in writing, by the selectmen of 
such town, and shall see that the same are kept in 
J™.™ 1 , 6 . re P air ! ^ ld tha t the railroad companies 
faithfully comply with the laws of this state, and 
the provisions of their several charters ; and said 
commissioners shall cause such portions of the 
laws as relate to the duty of railroad companies, 
and the offenses against railroads, as they may 
deem proper, to be published and posted up in 
some conspicuous place in every railroad depot, 
and at such other places as they shall direct. 

feFCT. 463. The railroad commissioners, or laa. 

exnedTp°nf I m '/^^ a V 0ften QS the ^ ma ^ *»»£»&£ 
expedient, and at their discretion, or upon com ^t broads, 

plaint, in writing, under oath of any person alleg- 
ing any particular in which the conduct of any 

3*2? C T;P an ^ or its a Sent, is inconsistent 
With ti e public safety ; and shall, upon complaint 
made, in writing, by any number of stockholders 
or creditors, not less than five/assigning in good 
faith sufficient reason therefor, visit and inspect 
•ads s -irf ° f SU ;'' com P a »^i" this state, its 
™ W t^' roa / ? vossn ^ buildings, stations, 

JES 1 * ld f !' a ,? d the en § ines aild cai>s belonging 
thereto and shall investigate the condition of such 
railroad and examine its by-laws and regula- 
tions, and the conduct of its officers and a-outs 

deL™" 6 n an ? a11 en ^ niries "eedfh to 
determine whether the affairs of such company 

SSXfii couf ? rmab1 ' to l ™> «* with pK 

saiety and convenience. 

sim.prM 64- ^ W1, enever the railroad commis-C°»™"s 

bioners intend to examine the road of imp rail. 1 togh,e notice of 

company, they shall give notice thereof n SEf 552 ^ - 
to such company, and of the time of their ^SK*"* 
posed examination ; and if, upon such an exami- 



262 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

nation, a majority of said commissioners shall be 
of opinion tliat safety to public travel or to the 
lives of the persons operating said road, require 
said railroad in any respect to be repaired, they 
shall forthwith, in writing, notify said company 
thereof, and order and direct said company to 
make the repairs required, within some reasonable 
time, to be by them limited for that purpose. 
Penalty for ne g - Sect. 465. Any railroad company which shall 
leatomakere- neglecfc or refuse to make the repairs ordered by 
the railroad commissioners within the time limited 
by them, shall forfeit to the treasurer of the state 
one hundred dollars for each day, beyond the time 
so limited, until said repairs arc completed to the 
acceptance of said commissioners. 
1865. Sect. 466. The railroad commissioners .may, 

to£R?&" h offlce from time to time, make orders prescribing the 
shan be kept i en gth of time for which the ticket office, at any 
railroad station, shall be kept open for the sale of 
tickets previous to the departure of each passen- 
ger train from such station ; and upon receiving 
the written complaint of any person, alleging that 
any such ticket office is not so kept open long 
enough reasonably to accommodate the public, the 
commissioners shall inquire into such a complaint 
without unnecessary delay, and. if they find the 
same to be true, they shall make a proper order 
for the correction of the evil mentioned in such 
complaint ; and no railroad company, while neg- 
lecting to obey any such order, shall demand or 
receive more than the regular ticket price for the 
fare of any passenger, upon any of its trains, who 
may omit to procure a ticket before entering such 
train. 
May direct how Sect. 467. For thfc purpose of preventing an- 

raifroad com pa- n0 y auce to the public through the obstruction 01 

a^theh- trains, highway crossings, at or near railroad stations, by 
c^ S siny: ishway cars standing upon "said crossings, or moving to 
and fro across the same, the railroad commission- 
ers may, from time to time, make orders regulat- 
ing the manner in which railroad companies shall 
manage their trains, engines, and cars at such 
places ; and upon receiving the written complaint 
of any person, alleging that any railroad company 
is in the habit of annoying the public in the man- 
ner aforesaid, at any such place specified in said 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 263 

complaint, the commissioners shall, without un- 
necessary delay, inquire into said complaint, and 
if they find the same to be true, they shall make 
a proper order for the evil specified in such com- 
plaint. 

In addition, June 30th, 1866. 

Sect. 1. That whenever it shall be necessary g5E*£S*. 
for any freight train on any railroad in this state struct ordinary 

J . ° • p » e • travel on nigh- 

to remain at any station lor the purpose of receiv-wa ys . 
ing or delivering freight or for any other ordinary 
purpose, in such a position as to obstruct the 
ordinary travel on any public highway for a period 
of time exceeding five minutes, it shall be the 
duty of the person having charge of such freight 
train to cause the same to be separated in such a 
manner as to accommodate the public travel on 
such public highway ; and any railroad company 
in this state in whose employment any person shall 
be who shall be guilty of a violation of this act, 
shall forfeit and pay a sum not exceeding ten dol- 
lars, to be recovered by an action on this statute to 
any person who shall sue therefor and prosecute 
his suit to effect. 

Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent Repeal, 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 468. The railroad commissioners, from HZ c c Z$lU e f' 
time to time, shall make such orders as thev may *° { u ™ ish com - 

, ,,. J .z fortable seats. 

deem necessary lor the purpose of compelling rail- 
road companies to furnish comfortable seats to all 
passengers upon their trains. The orders, provided ° r r ^ 9 ' how en " 
in this and the next two preceding sections, shall 
be made by the commissioners, and served in the 
manner prescribed, in the next succeeding section 
of this act. 

Sect. 469. The railroad commissioners shall f , } 85 . 3 - 

. Commissioners 

advise and recommend to any railroad company to to advise repairs, 

-i , . ». -, -i the adoption »»f 

make such repairs upon its road, or upon any rail- signals, rate of 
road bridge, or other property belonging to such speed ' &c " 
company, as they shall deem necessary to the pub- 
lic safety, and to the safety of the operatives on 
said road ; they shall recommend the adoption of 
additional signals, and other precautions, to pre- 
vent accidents, than those in use, and the employ 



264 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

ment of other and additional switchmen and 
signal-men, the application of safety-beams to the 
cars, stated examination of their wheels, axles, 
brakes, &c, having a due regard to the character 
and income of the road, also the number of brake- 
men that shall be placed and kept upon the trains 
of any road and in what proportion to the number 
of cars connected with its trains ; and if they shall 
deem necessary to the public safety, they shall 
recommend that express and other trains, run at 
high speed and on dangerous roads shall have a 
lookout upon the engine, distinct from the engine 
man and the conductor, who shall, at the approach 
of danger, sound the whistle, which shall be 
affixed to the engine in close proximity to his seat, 
and which shall be so constructed that the sound 
cannot be mistaken for that of the engineer, on 
the alarm of which every brakeman shall immedi- 
ately put on the brakes and stop the train ; they 
shall advise as to the rate of speed of the trains 
upon any road, or upon descending grades, at 
dangerous crossings, or upon other portions of the 
same, if, in their judgment the rate adopted by 
the directors of such road, or run upon the same, 
shall be greater than is consistent with the public 
safety ; they shall direct that suitable warning- 
boards are put up at such crossings as are danger- 
ous, and signal men stationed, or gates erected, at 
such as are extra hazardous ; or, if they shall 
deem proper, they shall direct that the engineer's 
whistle be blown continually, from a point eighty 
rods from any crossing, until the train has passed 
the same ; and that such warning boards shall be 
placed over the track at the switches and near the 
station, or in other places, warning people against 
walking upon the track, on penalty of the law, as 
Directions, &c, they may deem necessary and proper. All direc- 
how given. tion ^ advice? ancl recommendations, given and 

made by said commissioners, pursuant to the 
powers given in this section, shall be in writing, 
under the hands of said commissioners, or any two 
of them, served by copy upon the secretary of the 
company, by some indifferent person, and returned 
to the commissioner^ with an endorsement of 
service attested, sworn to. and the administration 
ot the oath certified thereon, and shall be pre- 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 265 

served by them, as herein before provided ; and the 
commissioners shall report any neglect to adopt 
any recommendation or advice made as aforesaid 
to the next general assembly. 

Sect. 470. If, upon examination of any rail- 1853. 
road, or its management, or the affairs of any rail- J ne"s C< ^a™ap- 
road company, a majority of the railroad commis- [/ o y n fo ^^ s D t c ; or . 
sioners shall be of opinion that its rails, bridges, porations, &c. 
switches, engines or cars, are in such a condition, 
or that its affairs are so conducted, as to endanger 
the safety of the public, or that said company has, 
in any material respect, violated the law, or 
refused to obey the directions of said commission- 
ers, or of any judge of the superior court, made 
under and pursuant to the powers given in this 
act, or has suffered any person to hold or exercise 
the duties of any office in said company, contrary 
to the provisions of this act, said commissioners, 
or a majority of them may make application to 
any judge of the superior court for an injunction 
to restrain such company, in whole or in part, 
from further proceeding with its business, and to 
restrain such persons from holding or exercising, 
or attempting to hold or exercise, the duties of 
such office, until a hearing can be had in the 
premises ; and said judge may issue such process 
and may, at his discretion, dissolve or modify said 
injunction, or make the same perpetual, and make 
such orders and decrees to suspend, restrain, or 
prohibit, the further proceedings of such company 
in ifs business, or such person in relation to such 
office, as in his judgment the public safety or the 
law may require, under such penalties as such 
judge may deem necessary and proper. 

Sect. 471. The directors of every railroad Directors to 
company shall, annually, on or before the first day p u n\o n the a com" 
of February, make report, under oath, to the rail- missioner »- 
road commissioners, of their acts and doings, and 
receipts and expenditures, under the provisions of 
its charter ; and every such company, whose 
directors shall neglect or refuse to make such re- 
ports, shall forfeit to the treasurer of the state the 
sum of twenty-live dollars, for each day of such 
neglect or refusal, if said commissioner shall re- 
port the same to such treasurer, who shall collect 
the same by due process of law ; and the books of 
34 



266 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

every such company shall, at all times, he open to 

the inspection of any committee of the general 

assembly appointed for that purpose. 

1853. Sect. 472. The railroad commissioners shall 

um]s'from r the annually call for accurate and full returns and 

companies, and statistics from each railroad company, under the 

to have power to . „ , .. n ■ -i 

examine officers, oath ol the president thereof, in accordance with 
c, under oat . ^ ]e | ) ] an j <s or f orma ] ier(7a fter appended, marked 

A, which blanks shall be furnished in duplicate to 
each railroad company in this state ; and they 
may summon and examine under oath, all direct- 
ors, officers, or agents of said companies, and such 
other witnesses as they may think proper, in rela- 
tion to the affairs, transactions, and condition of 
said companies ; and said directors, officers, 
agents, or other persons, who shall refuse, without 
justifiable cause, to appear and testify when thereto 
required, as aforesaid, or who shall in any way 
obstruct any railroad commissioner in the dis- 
charge of his duty, as prescribed in this act, shall 
be punished by a fine not exceeding one thousand 
dollars, or by imprisonment for a term not exceed- 
ing one year. 

In Addition, August 1st, 1872. 

Annual reports Sect. 1. The several railroad companies shall 
°inies r ° ad com * annually make to the railroad commissioners full 
report, and give accurate statistics for the year 
ending the thirtieth day of September, in accord- 
ance with the blank forms hereafter appended 
marked Schedule B, to be furnished in duplicate 
to each railroad company by the railroad commis- 
sioners, which report and statistics shall be signed 
under oath by the president and treasurer of the 
railroad company, or by a majority of the trustees 
who may be operating any railroad, and shall be 
returned to the railroad commissioners on or 
before the first day of December. 
Penalty for refu- Sect. 2. Every railroad company whose presi- 
mike report. 6 t0 dent and treasurer or trustees shall refuse or neg- 
lect to make the returns required by the preceding 
section, shall forfeit to the treasurer of the state 
the sum of twenty-five dollars for each day of such 
neglect or refusal, and said commissioners shall 
report the same to such treasurer, who shall col- 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 267 

lect the same by due process of law ; and the 
books of every such company shall at all times be 
open to the inspection of any committee of the 
general assembly appointed for that purpose. 

Sect. 3. Tbe railroad commissioners may sum- Powers of raii- 
mon and examine, under oatb, all directors, offi- siouera™o"araiii.- 
cers, agents, or trustees, of any railroad company, ine witnesses - 
and such otlier witnesseaas they may think proper, 
in relation to the affairs, transactions, and condi- 
tion of said company ; and said directors, officers, 
agents, trustees, or other persons, who shall re- 
fuse, without justifiable cause, to appear and 
testify, when thereto required as aforesaid, or who 
shall in any way obstruct any railroad commis- 
sioner in the discharge of his duty as prescribed 
in tins' act or in the act to which this act is an 
amendment, shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding one thousand dollars, or by imprisonment 
for a term not exceeding one year, or by such fine 
and imprisonment both. 

Sect. 4. Sections four hundred seventy-one Repeal, 
and four hundred seventy -two of title seven, chap- „ 

ter seven, of the general statutes are hereby re- 
pealed. 



SCHEDULE B. 

CAPITAL STOCK. 

1. Capital stock authorized by charter. 

2. Capital stock authorized by votes of the company. 

3. Capital stock actually paid in. 

4. Capital stock issued for earnings which had not been di- 

vided among stockholders. 

5. Capital stock -issued upon which no payment has been 
made either in cash or its equivalent. 

6. Total number of shares of stock issued. 

7. Far value per share of capital stock. 

8. Tot d par value of stock issued. 

9. Total market value on the 30th of September of stock 
issued. 



268 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

10. Amount of capital stock issued per mile of railroad owned 

by the company. 

11. Proportion of stock issued for Connecticut. 

12. Amount of stock held in Connecticut. 

13. Number of stockholders residing in Connecticut. 

DEBTS. 

1. Total amount of funded debt. 

First mortgage bonds due. 
Rate of interest per cent. 
Second mortgage bonds due. 
Rate of interest per cent. 
All others. 

2. Amount of floating debt. 

3. Total amount of funded and floating debt. 

4. Proportion of same per mile of road. 

5. Proportion of same for Connecticut. 

COST. 

1. *Total cost of entire road to date. 

(This item to include grading and masonry, bridging, 
superstructure, land damages and fences, stations, 
engine and car houses, and cost of engineering.) 

2. Proportion of same per mile of road. 

3. Proportion of same for Connecticut. 

4. Total cost of entire equipment. 

(This item to include locomotives, cars, machinery, 
and tools, and machine shops not included above.) 

5. Proportion of same per mile of road. 

6. Proportion of same for Connecticut. 

CHARACTERISTICS. 

1. Total length of main line of road. 

2. Length of same in Connecticut. 

3. Length of same in other states (giving name of states and 

length in each.) 

4. Name and length of branches. 

5. Total length of brunches. 

6. Length ol same in Connecticut. 

7. Aggregate length of sidings. 

8. Length of same in Connecticut. 

9. Total length of track for the entire road (single track 

miles.) 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 269 

10. Length of same in Connecticut. 

11. Total length of double track. 

12. Length of same in Connecticut. 

13. Miles of track laid with steel rails. 

14. Aggregate length of wooden bridges. 

15. Aggregate length of iron bridges. 

16. Aggregate length of stone arch bridges. 

17. Number of public highways crossed at grade in Con- 

necticut. 

18. Number of railroads crossed at grade in Connecticut. 
19: Name of each. 

20. Total number of stations on entire road. 

21. Number of same in Connecticut. 



ROADS BELONGING TO OTHER COMPANIES OPERATED BY THIS 
COMPANY UNDER LEASE. 

22. Name, termini, and length of each. 

23. Total length of all. 

24. Total length of all in Connecticut. 

25. Total number of stations on all roads operated by this 

company. 

26. Total number of same in Connecticut. 

# 

MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

1. Number of engines, average weight with tender full ( ). 

2. Number of passenger cars, average weight ( ). 

3. Number merchandise cars, average weight ( ). 

4. Number of baggage cars, average weight ( ). 

5. Number of gravel and other cars. 

6. Number of men employed, exclusive of those engaged in 

construction. 

7. Average rate of speed of express passenger trains when 

in motion. 

8. Average rate of same, including stops. 

9. Average rate of speed of accommodation trains. 

10. Highest rate of speed allowed freight trains "in motion. 

FARES AND FREIGHT. 

1. Highest rate of passenger fare per mile for distances less- 

than three miles. 

2. Highest rate of same for distances more than three miles. 

3. Highest rate per mile for through passengers. 



270 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

4. General average rates. 

5. Highest rate of freight per ton per mile for first, second, 

third and fourth classes. 

6. Lowest contract rate of same per ton per mile for first, 

second, third and fourth classes. 

7. Average rate of freight per ton per mile for first, second, 

third and fourth classes. 

DOINGS DURING THE YEAR. 

1. Miles run by passenger trains. 

2. Miles run by freight trains. 

8. Miles run by other trains. 

4. Total miles run. 

5. Number of passengers carried. 

G. Number of passengers carried one mile. 

7. Number of passengers carried one mile to and from other 

roads. 

8. Tons of merchandise carried. 

9. Tons of merchandise carried one mile. 

Kb Tons of merchandise carried to and from other roads. 



EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO COST OP ROAD ' AND EQUIPMENT 
DURING THE YEAR. 



1. Extension or alteration of road. 

2. Land or land damages. 

3. New buildings. 

4. New rolling stock. 

5. Any other expenditure. 

6. Total. 

EXPENDITURES FOR OPERATING DURING THE YEAR. 

Cost of Maintenance of Way and Buildings. 

1. Repairs of road, exclusive of bridges and new rails. 

2. New iron rails (No. of tons and cost.) 

3. New steel rails (No. of tons and cost.) 

4. Repairs of bridges. 

5. Repairs of buildings and fixtures. 

6. Repairs of fences. 

7. Removing ice and snow. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 271 



8. Total for maintenance of way. 

9. Cost per mile of road kept in repair. 
10. Proportion for Connecticut. 



COST OF MAINTENANCE OF MOTIVE POWER AND CARS. 

1. Repairs of locomotives. 

2. Repairs of machinery. 

3. Repairs of passenger, baggage and mail cars. 

4. Repairs of freight cars. 

5. Cost of fuel, wood, $ 



coal, | Total > 

6. Oil used by engines and cars. 

7. Waste and other material for cleaning. 

8. Total for maintenance of motive power and cars. 

9. Cost per mile of road operated. 
10. Proportion for Connecticut. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. Salaries, wages and incidentals chargeable to passenger 

department. 

2. Salaries, wages and incidentals, chargeable to freight de- 

partment. 

3. Wages of switchmen, signal-men, gate-keepers and watch- 

men. 

4. Gratuities. 

5. Damages for injuries to persons. 

6. Damages for cattle killed. 

7. Damages for loss of goods and baggage. 

8. Damages to property, including damages by fire. 

9. Taxes. 

10. Insurance. 

11. Telegraph expenses. 

12. Amount paid other companies as rent for use of road, 

specifying each company. 

13. Amount paid other companies in tolls for passengers and 

freight, specifying each company. 

14. General salaries and office expenses, law expenses, and 

all other expenses (except interest) not included in 
any of the above items. 

15. Total miscellaneous. 

16. Amount per mile of road operated. 

17. Proportion for Connecticut. 



272 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

Total expenditure for operating the road. 
Total cost per mile of road operated. 
Proportionate total for Connecticut. 



INCOME. 

1. From passengers — 

On main road and branches owned by company. 
To and from other roads. 

2. From freight — 

On main road and branches owned by company. 
To and from other roads. 

3. U. S. Mails. 

4. Rents. 

5. Expresses. 

6. Total income. 

7. Income per mile of road operated. 

8. Proportionate income for Connecticut. 

9. Income above operating expenses. 

10. Amount paid for interest. 

11. Total net income. 

12. Number and per cent, dividends. 

13. Amount paid in dividends. 

14. Paid to sinking fund. 

15. Surplus for the year. 

16. Surplus last year. 

17. Total surplus. 

18. Surplus invested as follows : 

Cash and loans. 

Balance of accounts due the company. 

Materials, fuel, and stores. 

Other items. 



STATEMENT OP EACH ACCIDENT. 

(Signed.) President. 

(Signed.) Secretary. 

(Affidavit.) 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROAB&J 273 

Sect. 473. The railroad commissioner!*! shall ^^° general 
make a report of the general conduct and coiiadi- 
tion of all the railroads within the state, to each 
general assembly, in the first week of its session, 
making such suggestions for legislation, as the 
public interest shall seem to them to require ; and 
in case any violation of law, on the part of any 
railroad company shall come to the knowledge of 
said commissioners, they shall, in like manner, 
make report thereof. 

Sect. 474. Every railroad company may lay 0fwid 1 t ^f road) 
out its road, not exceeding; six rods wide, and for and °* obtaining 

o materials tor its 

the purpose of cuttings, embankments, and pro- construction. 
curing stone and gravel, and for necessary turn- 
outs, take as much more land, within the limits of 
its charter, in the manner provided in this act as 
may be necessary for the proper construction and 
security of the road ; and if it shall not be able to 
obtain land for the purposes aforesaid, by an agree- company may 

• i i i ii ip take land, on 

ment with tlie owners thereof, it shall pay tberelor payment of ap- 
such damages as shall be estimated and determined uraisement - 
by appraisers, to be appointed by a judge of the 
superior court in the manner hereinafter provided ; 
and no land without the limits of said road shall 
be so taken, without the permission of the owner 
thereof, unless the railroad commissioners, on ap- ^°" 1 ™ 1 ^° n i e b r e s 
plication of such company, and after notice to the limits > &c - 
said owner, shall first prescribe the limits within 
which land shall be taken* for the purpose afore- 
said ; and no railroad company shall lay out, and 
finally locate its road, without the written appro- 
bation of the location by a majority of said com- 
missioners, except so far foith as the location is 
definitely fixed in the act of incorporation. 

Sect. 475. Whenever any railroad company t^eiauaTrraii- 
intends to take land for the purpose of laying out, [™ u - llQW in f»- 

... r .. r i 'uted, notice how 

making and maintaining its railroad, such company given, and a P - 
may, before such land is actually taken and appro- made!™" 1 
priated for such purpose, apply to any judge of the 
superior court for the appointment of appraisers, to 
estimate the damages that shall be occasioned by 
such laying out, making and maintaining such 
road ; and after reasonable notice of the intended 
application shall have been given to the owner of 
said land, such judge shall appoint three apprais- 
ers, who shall estimate such damages, but shall 
35 



274 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



Railroad not to 
be worked until 
damages have 
been paid. 



1858. 
Railroad com- 
pany not liable 
for damages to 
land owners, 
where road is 
discontinued. 



Land owner may 
recover actual 
damages. 



1849. 
Owners of land 
may within 
three years re- 
quire a plan of 
land taken. 



not include in such estimate the cost or expense 
of erecting and maintaining fences along the line 
of such railroad ; and they shall return an ap- 
praisement of such damages, in writing, under 
their hands, to the clerk of the superior court in 
the county where the land lies, who shall record 
it, and when so returned and recorded, such ap- 
praisement shall have the effect of a judgment, and 
execution may issue, at the end of sixty days from 
the time of such return, in favor of the persons re- 
spectively to whom damages may be appraised ; 
and said appraisers shall be paid by said company 
for the time actually spent in making such ap- 
praisement and return ; but no railroad shall be 
worked upon, or opened across the lands of any 
person, until the damages appraised to such per- 
son shall have been paid, or secured to be paid to 
his satisfaction, or deposited with the treasurer of 
the county for his use.* 

Sect. 476. Whenever any railroad shall have 
been laid out by any railroad company, and the 
damages occasioned, or to be occasioned, by the 
laying out* making and maintaining said road, 
shall have been appraised in favor of the owners 
of land over which such railroad is laid ; and such 
road, or any part or branch thereof, shall have 
been abandoned or discontinued before the same 
shall have been opened and worked, no action shall 
be brought against said* company for the recovery 
of such appraisement, by any of the owners of land 
over which such road or part of a road shall have 
been laid out and discontinued as aforesaid; but 
any such land owner may recover of such com- 
pany the actual damage which he may have suf- 
fered in consequence of the laying out of such 
road, or from any unreasonable delay in opening 
and working the same, by an action founded on 
this statute. 

Sect. 477. Whenever any railroad company 
shall, by virtue of its charter, take any land, or 
other property for the purpose of its railroad, the 
owner of such land or other property may, at any 
time within three years from the time of taking 



* Owner of fee of highway, on which a railroad is located, entitled to damages. 
Imlay vs. Union Branch B. It. Co., 26 C. R., 249. 

Incidental injury to adjacent land of same proprietor to be considered. Same. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 275 

the same, demand in writing of the treasurer, or 
principal agent of the company, a written plan or 
description of the land or other property so taken ; 
and said company shall, within thirty days from 
the time of such demand, deliver to him such de- 
scription or plan, and all the rights of said com- 
pany to enter upon or use said land or other 
property, except for making surveys, shall be 
suspended until it shall have so delivered such 
description or plan, within a reasonable time after 
such demand shall have been made. 

Sect. 478. Within ninety days after the rail- corporation to 
road of any company shall have been laid out by roaTwith a town 
the company, and approved by the railroad com- clerk ' 
missioners, and the width of land designated and 
settled through any town, such company shall de- 
posit with the town clerk a correct plan signed by 
the president of said company, of so much of said 
railroad as lies in said town, drawn upon a scale of 
at least five inches to the mile, upon which shall 
be accurately delineated' the direction and length 
of each course, and the width of the land therein 
taken for the purposes of said road, together with 
such explanations as may be necessary to make 
the same intelligible and useful. 

Sect. 471*. Every railroad company shall, within Location of road 
six months after the final location of its road, file retary's office. 
a statement of such location, defining the courses 
and distances, with the secretary of this state. 

In Addition, July 19<A, 1867. 

Sect. 1. When the survey of any railroad com- Railroad compa- 
pany shall have been accepted by the railroad tne^ighToTway 
eummissioners, said company shall procure and mo^h/aft'erVe 
pay for the right of way of all lands through which acceptance of 

1 - e> " J o the surrey. 

they may pass, within twelve months, or make 
satisfactory arrangements with the parties owning 
said lands, or said acceptance by said commission- 
ers shall be void. 

Sect. 2. All railroad companies shall cause Railroads to be 
their road to be fenced within twelve months after twelve months 
they enter upon and take possession of the lauds p^isslon of k the 
through which they pass. lan < i3 - 

Sect. 480. Whenever it shall be necessary f or Railroads ma y 



276 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



or°w S at°er course!* tne construction of a railroad to intersect or cross 
any stream of water or watercourse not navigable, 
or any public road, highway or street, tbe railroad 
company may construct said railroad across or 
upon the same, if the railroad commissioners shall 
adjudge it necessary, but said company shall re- 
store the said stream, or water course, or road, or 
highway, or street thus intersected to its former 
state, or in sufficient manner not to impair its use- 
fulness ; and in case any road, highway, or street 
is so located that said railroad cannot be judi- 
ciously laid out and constructed across or upon 
the same without interfering therewith, said com- 
pany may, by and with the advice and consent of 
the said commissioners, cause such road, highway 
or street, to be changed or altered in such manner 
that said railroad may be made on the best site 
of ground for that purpose ; but said company 
shall put such road in as good repair as it was pre- 
vious to such alteration, under the direction of, 
said commissioners, whose determination thereon 
shall be filed.* 



An Act in Addition. 

h^wa°vr?o y r° ver 8ect - 1- Whenever any highway or street 
rereads, how s h a ll be changed or altered by any railroad com- 

obtained. • i 1 , • 

pany with the advice and consent of the general 
railroad commissioners, pursuant to the provisions 
of section four hundred and eighty, chapter seven, 
title seven, of the revised statues of this state, if it 
shall be necessary to take any land for a highway 
to which such company has not obtained a title, 
and over which neither said company nor the town 
in which sucli change shall be made has any right 
of way, and said company are unable to agree with 
the owner or owners thereof in regard to the 
amount of damages to be paid therefor, the same 
proceedings shall be had for the purpose of pro- 
curing the required right of way as are provided 
by sections five hundred and two, and five hun- 



* Determination of commissioners cannot be reviewed by the superior court 
Waterbury vs. H. P. & F. R. R. Co., 27 C. R., 146. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 277 

dred and four of the chapter and title aforesaid, in 
tegaid to taking land for railroad purposes. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect from its pas- 
sage. 

Appi'oved, July 5th, 1871. 

Sect. 481. Every railroad company which mayM a y cha "seioca 

-ii tion or alter level 

locate and construct a railroad across any turn- of roads inter- 
pike, highway or public street, shall construct it so rectum of the 
as to cross over or under the said turnpike, high- comm 'ssioners. 
way, or street ; and for this purpose it may, under 
the direction of the railroad commissioners, raise 
or lower said turnpike, highway, or street, at the 
said crossing, or change the location thereof, and 
shall make, keep up, and maintain sucli bridges, 
abutments, tunnels, arches, excavations, embank- 
ments, and approaches, as the convenience and 
safety of the public travel upon said turnpike, 
highway or street, may require ; but the railroad 
commissioners may, upon due notice to said com- 
pany and to the selectmen of the town or mayor 
of the city, in which said crossing is situated, 
authorize and direct such company to construct 
its railroad at such crossing upon a level with the 
turnpike, highway, or street ; and, if they deem it 
necessary, may require the said company to erect to maintain 
and maintain .a gate across the railroad at such gates- 
crossing, and to provide an agent to open and close 
the same. 

• ■ 
In Addition, June %0th, 1866. 

Sect. 1. That whenever any public highway ijawifly of raa- 

or any portion thereof, has been or shall be taken for highways"* 
by any railroad company for railroad purposes, or rrad^uJposes or 
when such highway has been determined and ad-j^"^™ 1 
judged by a committee of three disinterested and 
judicious persons, or a majority of them, appointed 
by the superior court in the county in which such 
road shall lie, to be dangerous to the public travel, 
by reason of such railroad, or when any alteration 
of such highway, or the building of a new high- 
way, in the opinion of said committee, or a major- 
ity of them, is thereby rendered necessary for the 
public safety and convenience, the town or towns 
whose duty it is to make such alteration or build 



278 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

such highway, or who are required hy law to do 
the same, shall have the right in case the railroad 
corporation refuse to comply with the order of the 
court (by any proper action), to recover all dam- 
ages and expenses incurred in such building or 
alteration of such highway, from the railroad cor- 
poration so taking or endangering the same ; pro- 
vided, that nothing herein contained shall apply 
to any highway laid out or constructed since the 
construction of a railroad across or near which it 
may run. 
Not applicable to Sect. 2. The provisions of this act shall not 

horse railroads. -i . -i j -li-.i- 

apply to horse railroads nor to any railroad within 
the limits of any incorporated city. 

,^ 185 ?,- Sect. 482. Whenever the selectmen of any 

When railroad , , . . -. „ ». • 

company shaii town, or the mayor and aldermen ot any city in 
atTroadcros^ e which any railroad company shall have located 
ing, &c an( j constructed its railroad track across any turn- 

pike, highway, or public street, upon a level with 
said turnpike, highway,, or street, shall make 
written request to the railroad commission- 
ers to make an examination of any such cross- 
ing, said commissioners shall make such ex- 
amination ; and if, in their opinion, the safety 
and interests of the public require it. said railroad 
company shall erect and maintain a gate across 
said turnpike, highway, or street, at such crossing 
and provide an agent to open and close the same. 
1865. Sect. 483. The selectmen of any town in 

may ordCTgates which the track of any railroad may cross any 
to be erected, or highway upon a level with such highway, may, at 

flagmen sta- • j 1 i i 1 e 

tionedatroad any time and, when requested by ten electors of 

crossings, when. •, in 1 i» x." • • t-' 

said town, shall make application in writing 
to the railroad commissioners, requesting said 
commissioners to order a gate or gates to be 
erected or a flagman or flagmen to be stationed 
at the place where said railroad may cross said 
highway ; and thereupon the commissioners, with- 
out unnecessary delay, shall visit said town and 
make an examination of such place, having first 
given reasonable notice of the time when said ex- 
amination is to be made, so that said selectmen 
maybe present thereat if they see fit: and if, 
upon such examination, the commissioners may be 
of opinion that the public safety and interests re- 
quire it, they shall order the company operating 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 279 

said railroad to erect and maintain a gate or gates 
or to station and keep a flagman or flagmen at said 
place, or to do any other acts which the commis- 
sioners may deem needful for the protection of the 
public at said place ; and in making any such 
order the commissioners may specify at what time 
said gate is to be opened and closed, or at wbat 
times said flagman is to be kept on duty. 

In addition, June 30th, 1866. 

Sect. 1. So much of section four hundred and Repeal - 
eighty-three of the act of which this act is in alter- 
ation as makes it the duty of •' the selectmen of 
any town in which the track of any railroad may 
cross any highway, upon a level with such high- 
way," when requested by ten electors of such 
town, to make application to the railroad commis- 
sioners, requesting them to order a gate or gates 
to be erected, or a flagman or flagmen to be sta- 
tioned at the place where said railroad may cross 
said highway is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 2. Whenever the selectmen of any town f!x P en! ? 30fun -. 
shall, in pursuance of the four hundred and cation for rail- 
eighty-second and the four hundred and eighty- g^ners'toorder 
third sections of the act of which this act is in ^ s ^ g r s oa ^ ow 
alteration, apply to the railroad commissioners, borDe - 
requesting them to make any of the orders men- 
tioned in said sections upon any railroad company 
and said commissioners shall be of opinion, upon 
examination, that the public safety and interests 
do not 'require that such order or orders be made, 
the town or towns whose selectmen shall make 
said application, shall pay to said commissioners 
all their fees and expenses arising under said ap- 
plication. 

. In Act -in Relation to Railroads and Railroad 
Companies. 

Section four hundred and eighty-three, chapter ^""fniay or- 8 " 
seven, title seven, of an act relating to communi-der establish. 

,. . . . n,i -ii nient ol gate?, 

ties and corporations, be, and the same is hereby electric signals, 
amended, so that the railroad commissioners may SLdfSSSngs »t 
order gate or gates, flagman or flagmen, or elec- tneir discretion. 



boards at road 
crossings. 



280 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

trie c ignals at road crossings as they may deem 
proper. 
Approved July 11th, 1871. 

Commissioners j| Sect. 484. The railroad commissioners may 
may c ange or- c ] lan g e an ^ or der authorized in the next preceding 
section (section 483) when they deem it necessary 
so to do, but not without first visiting said town, 
and there giving the selectmen thereof a reason- 
able opportunity to appear before them, and object 
to the proposed change. 
Railroad compa- Sect. 485. The railroad company operating 

nies shall main- m J 1 • 1 1 • 1 

tain warning any railroad, which may cross any highway on a 

level with the same, and where there is or shall 

be no such gate, shall, at all times, keep and 

maintain good and sufficient warning boards of 

such form, size and description, as the railroad 

commissioners shall approve. 

i860. Sect. 486. Whenever any railroad company 

lect *o ^lace'stg- shall neglect or refuse to place signals or flagmen 

when°dfSd?' at points on its roads, as may be recommended by 

the railroad commissioners, it shall forfeit to the 

treasurer of this state the sum of fifty dollars for 

each day of said neglect, to be recovered in an 

action of debt on tins statute. 

In Addition, June 2>Qth, 1866. 

Hand cars not to Sect. 1. That no hand car or other car not 

be left on rail- .. . 

road tracks near moved by steam, belonging to any railroad com- 
crossmgs. ^^ ^^ uf , e( j ^ them upon any railroad in this 

state, when removed from the track of such rail- 
road (except when placed in a building prepared 
for it), shall be allowed to remain within fifty feet 
of any road or highway crossing said railroad 
track. 
Penalty. . Sect. 2. Any railroad company which shall be 

guilty of a violation of this act shall be liable to 
pay a fine not exceeding the sum of fifty dollars, 
to the treasurer of the town within which such of- 
fense shall have been committed. 

state' 8 18 auorney Sect. 487. Whenever any railroad company 
to make com- shall nedect to construct any highway, or any 

plaint against ° ..., i i • i 

railroad company bridge, WlllCIl it IS ITS dllt}* to COUSU'UCt, and WlllCll 

pafr highway,™" is necessary to conduct any highway over its rail- 

&c. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 281 

road, or shall neglect to keep in good and sufficient 
repair any such bridge, or any embankment, filling 
or abutment, which it is its duty to maintain, 
which has been or may be constructed for the pur- 
pose of conducting any highway over said railroad 
or for the purpose of conducting such railroad over 
any highway, or shall neglect to keep in good and 
sufficient repair any bridge owned by such com- 
pany, and used by the public, for the purposes of 
travel on foot, or in carriages, whether the same 
is, or has been, a toll or free bridge, the attorney 
for the state in any county wherein such neglect 
exists, in which the whole, or any part of said 
bridge is situated, shall make complaint thereof to 
the superior court for such county ; and said court 
shall proceed in the same manner against said 
railroad company as is required against towns 
neglecting to construct any road laid out by the 
superior court, or neglecting to keep in repair any 
public road within their limits, which it is their 
duty to construct or keep in repair. 

Sect. 488. Every owner of land adjoining any Land \ s ^ eTS 
railroad, who, prior to the twenty-second day of" lien ' of(, » c « , 

t -io-n • i ,- c if • line of road and 

June, 18*0, received compensation tor fencing penalty for ne g - 
along the line of land taken for the purposes of ec ' 
said railroad, shall build and maintain a lawful 
fence on said line, or as near thereto as he con- 
veniently can ; and if said owner, his heirs or as- 
signs, shall not build said fence within sixty days 
after he shall have been notified so to do by said 
company, s-uch company may build the same, and 
recover the expense thereof in an action of debt 
against the person so neglecting to build or main- 
tain said fence. 

Sect. 489. Every railroad company which has _ ., ls p- 

J . if -\\T i Railroad compa- 

been incorporated since the first Wednesday ol nies to fence line 
May 1850, or which shall hereafter be incorpo- roa ' w en 
rated, shall erect and maintain good and sufficient 
fences on both sides of its railroads, throughout 
its whole extent, except at such places as, in 
the opinion of the railroad commissioners, the 
erection and maintenance of the same shall be in- 
expedient or unnecessary. 

Sect. 490. Whenever any owner of land on 1865. 
the line of any railroad while said road is or shall peifed to fence 
be in process of construction, or after said road compiaint d o ° n 
36 



282 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



land owner. 



Penalty of neg- 
lect to erect 
fence. 



Land owners 

wheu to erect 
fence and how 
compelled. 



lias been, or shall have been constructed, shall 
complain in writing to the railroad commissioners, 
that the railroad company, constructing or operat- 
ing said road, neglects or refuses to erect a suit- 
able fence along said line to the damage or incon- 
venience of said land owner, said commissioners 
shall visit and examine the locality where said griev- 
ance is so alleged to exist ; and if, in the opinion of 
said commissioners, there is just cause for said 
complaint, said commissioners shall order said 
company to erect a suitable fence at said place in 
such manner and within such time as in the order. 
said commissioners shall prescribe ; and said order 
shall be served in writing on said company in the 
manner and form provided by the four hundred 
and sixty-ninth section of this act. 

Sect. 491. If any railroad company shall neg- 
lect or refuse to erect said fence in compliance 
with said order of said commissioners, said com- 
pany shall forfeit the sum of fifty dollars for eacli 
and every day's neglect or refusal so to do; one 
half to him who shall sue therefor and prosecute 
his suit to effect, and the other half to the treasury 
of this state. • 

Sect. 492. Whenever it is the duty of any 
owner of land to erect a fence in any place along 
the line of any railroad in this state, and such 
owner shall neglect to erect a suitable fence in 
such place, if, in the opinion of the railroad com- 
missioners such fence is needed thereat, they shall 
give notice in writing to said owner that unless 
such fence shall be erected within a time specified 
in said notice, the railroad company, whose line 
is adjoining said land, will be required to erect 
such fence at the expense and charge of said 
owner; and if said owner shall not erect such 
fence within the time so limited in such notice, 
the commissioners shall then notify said railroad 
company of their action, and of the neglect of said 
owner, and shall give an order in writing to said 
company to erect such fence, within such time as 
said order shall prescribe ; and said order shall 
be served in the manner provided in the four hun- 
dred and sixty-ninth section of this act ; and if 
said company shall neglect or refuse to comply 
witli the terms of said order, it shall incur the 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 283 

same forfeiture, and to be recovered in the same 
manner as is prescribed in the next preceding sec- 
tion of this act. 

Sect. 493. Whenever any railroad company Railroad compa- 
shall have incurred any expense in the erection 5J n uSdof Uen 
of any fence in compliance with the provisions of """rectTenw'fo? 
the next preceding section, such expense having expenses, 
first been ascertained and approved by the rail- 
road commissioners, shall constitute a lien in favor 
of said company upon the land against which said 
fence is erected, and adjoining and connected 
therewith, owned by the person whose duty it was 
to erect said fence ; and said lien shall take prece- 
dence of every other lien or incumbrance upon 
said land, and may be foreclosed in the same 
manner as mortgage liens ; but such lien shall 
not continue in force unless said company shall, 
within sixty days after the completion of said 
fence lodge a certificate with the town clerk ofc e r tifi ™ teo f> ieu 

,i . , • ■ • • it •! • to be filed with 

the town in winch said land is situated, describing town cierk and 
the premises on which said lien shall be claimed, recor 
and specifying the amount claimed as a lien there- 
on, and the date and commencement of said lien, 
which certificate shall be recorded by said town 
clerk in the land records of said town. 

Sect. 494. Every railroad company shall con- Raiirold 52 compa- 
struct and maintain good and sufficient fences on "y t0 maiDtai ° , 

. ° , fences on part of 

one or both sides of its road, where the same runs«unr road, with- 
within the limits of any public highway or turn- 1 " ' slway ' 
pike road, or adjoining thereto ; and the commis- 
sioners shall examine and inquire into the neces- 
sity for the construction or repair of any fence or 
fences on any part of said road, as aforesaid, when 
thereunto requested in writing by the selectmen 
of any town, or by the mayor of any city ; and 
any railroad company, neglecting or refusing to Penalty for neg 
comply with the order of said commissioners ect ' 
within the time limited by them, shall forfeit the 
sum of one hundred dollars for each day beyond 
the time so limited, until said fence or fences shall 
be constructed or repaired, to the acceptance of 
said commissioners ; one half to him who shall 
sue therefor and prosecute his suit to effect, and 
the other half to the treasurer of the state. 

Sect. 495. Every railroad company shall con- i860. 
struct suitable cattle guards in the form of culverts Se™"rdT tcat ' 



284 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

or pits, at all places where its railroads shall cross 
public highways or passways, and in connection 
with such cattle guards, shall construct a good and 
sufficient fence to the lands of the adjoining pro- 
prietor, except at such places as, in the opinion of 
the railroad commissioners the construction of 
such cattle guards and fences shall be inexpedient 
or unnecessary, and such cattle guards and fences 
shall be constructed in such manner as to prevent 
and restrain cattle from passing on to such railroad 
from said public highways and passways, or from 
the lands of adjoining proprietors ; and any rail- 
road company, which shall neglect or refuse to 
construct such cattle guards, shall forfeit the sum 
penalty for neg- of Qne huudred do ii ars to the treasury of the state ; 

and the attorney for the state in any county in 

which it is the duty of such company to construct 

any such cattle guard, shall prosecute all violations 

of this section.* 

1865. Sect. 496. Whenever twenty or more electors 

pefraii n ro^ ( C oTof this state shall present their petition in writing, 

panies to lo.-ate to any . i ud or e f the superior court, alleging that 

depot or station, J •> o f . 1 1 *i 

by, to whom, an y railroad company therein named, whose rail- 

andhowmade. ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ unfinishedj and in prOCCSS of 

construction, or about to be put in process of con- 
struction, ought, for the reasonable accommoda- 
tion of the public, to locate and establish a depot 
or station on the line of said railroad at, or near, 
any point mentioned in said petition, and further 
alleging that the petitioners have reason to fear 
that said company does not intend to locate and 
establish said depot or station at or near said 
point, the judge shall, by his order, in writing, 
direct sucli notice as he may deem reasonable 
to be given to said company, in such manner as 
said order shall direct, summoning said company 
to appear before him at such time and place as 
said order shall specify to answer said petition. 
jndgemayap- Seot. 497. At the time and place mentioned 
m',T\o".rt'"with in such order, said judge shall give both parties 
E^taS*' reasonable opportunity to be heard in relation to 
in g location. ^ appointment of an engineer, for the purposes 



* Applies to railroad companies incorporated before and after the passage ol 

the act. (1850.) Bulklcy vs. N. T. & N. H. Railroad Co., 27 C. 11., 47'.). 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 285 

specified in the two next succeeding sections of 
this act ; and thereupon said judge shall select 
and appoint a practical engineer, skilled in the 
construction of railroads, who shall act with the 
railroad commissioners in the manner provided in 
said sections ; and said judge may, if he shall 
think proper, in any case, select and appoint such 
an engineer, who does not reside in this state, if 
the services of such a non-resident engineer can 
be obtained for said purpose ; and the engineer ap- 
pointed by said judge shall be sworn to the faith- 
ful discharge of the duties of his appointment. 

Sect. 498. The railroad commissioners, and commissioners 
the engineer, appointed in the maner provided in may "hear the 
the next preceding section, shall upon said ap- ^j^ theiooa^ 
pointment being made, give such notice as they tion - 
may deem reasonable, to both parties to appear 
before them at such time and place as said notice 
shall designate, and be heard in relation to the 
matters alleged in said petition ; and after having 
given said parties due opportunity to be heard, 
with their evidence, if said commissioners concur 
with said engineer in finding said petition to be 
true, they shall, by their order, in writing, special- 
ly designate the place, within the limits embraced 
in said petition, where the railroad company shall 
locate, establish, and maintain, a suitable depot or 
station ; and said commissioners and engineer 
shall furnish a copy of said order to each party ; 
and thereupon said company shall locate and 
establish said depot or station at the place desig- 
nated in said order as soon as said company shall 
commence operating its railroad at said place, and 
shall thereafter maintain the same at such place. 

Sect. 499. If the railroad commissioners shall Petition to be 
concur with said engineer in finding said petition found untrue ; 
to be untrue, they shall dismiss the same ; and if^Sfcrsto 
said engineer shall 'not concur with said commis- n , iak ? r , Bport i t0 

° . - ,. . , ... the judge, when. 

sioners, either in finding said petition to be true, 
or in finding it to be untrue, the said engineer and 
said commissioners shall each make a written re- 
port of the facts found by them, respectively, and 
of their respective opinions thereon, and shall re- 
turn said reports to said judge, who shall, there- 
upon make such order relative to the subject mat" 
ter of said petition, as upon an examination of 



286 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



Petitioners may 
be required to 
give security for 
payment of bill 
of engineer. 



said reports he may deem reasonable ; and any 
order so made by him against said company shall 
be binding upon the same. 

_ Sect. 500. At the time of appointing said en- 
gineer, or at any subsequent time during the pen- 
dency of the proceedings, the judge mav require 
the petitioners, on penalty of the dismissal of their 
petition, to furnish such security as he shall order, 
for the payment of tbe fees and expenses of said 
engineer, upon the termination of his services, if 
he shall present his bill therefor to said judge ; 
and said judge shall thereupon by such notice as 
lie may deem reasonable, give an opportunity to 
the petitioners and to said company, to appear be- 

iMiito be taxe ^ hlm ' and be heard in Nation to said bill ; and 
byth°ejudgt xed lie y hall tax aud allow said bill at such sum as he 
shall deem reasonable, and may make such order 
m reference to the payment thereof, by the peti- 
tioners or by said company, as, in his judgment, 
may seem right ; and the fees and expenses so 
ny whom paid, taxed and allowed shall be paid in any event, by 
the petitioners; but if said judge shall so order, 
the whole, or a part thereof, 'shall be refunded by 
said company to the petitioners. 

In Addition, June 30th, 1866. 
Railroad stations Sect. 1. No railroad corporation shall abandon 

not to i.) a uiscon- i . , ,_. i • 1 • 

tinued without any aepot or station which is on its road, and in 
SHES?"""^ sfcat e, after the same has been established for 
twelve months, except by the approval of the gen- 
eral railroad commissioners, given after a public 
hearing held at the depot in question, and of which 
hearing and of the intention to abandon, notice 
shall be given by posting the same conspicuously 
in said depot or station for one month previous to 
the hearing. 
doued na wherto . Sect. 2. Any depot or station on any railroad 
be re-established, m this state, wliich has been abandoned at any 
time since the first day of January, 1866, shall, 
upon the petition Jo the general railroad commis- 
sioners of thirty freeholders residing in the town 
where said depot or station was located, be re- 
stored upon the approval of said commissioners 
given after a public hearing held at the depot near- 
est to said discontinued depot, and after notice of 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 287 

said bearing shall have been conspicuously posted 
at the place of hearing for one month previous to 
the hearing. 

In Addition, June 30th, 1866. 

Sect. 1. Whenever any village in this state when railroad 

, • . i , • a , i ji i trains may be re- 

containing a population ot not less than two nun- qu iredto"stop 
dred inhabitants is situated upon the line of a ra il. near ^ lh e eB - 
road, and the business centre of said village is 
more than one and one-half miles distant from 
the nearest station on said railroad, and not more 
than one-third of a mile distant from said railroad 
it shall be the duty of the general railroad com- 
missioners, upon the petition of twenty or more 
inhabitants of said village, praying that the trains 
upon said railroad shall be required to stop at or 
near said village, to receive and discharge passen- 
gers and freight, to inquire into all the facts of the 
case, and if (having a due regard for the interest 
in general) they find that the prayer of the peti- 
tioners can be granted without serious injury to 
the business of said railroad, they may give such 
directions and orders in regard to the stoppage of 
any of the trains upon said railroad, at or near 
said village, for the purpose of receiving and dis- 
charging passengers and freight as they shall 
deem it just and reasonable. 

Sect. 2. Any railroad company which shall Penalty ' 
refuse or neglect to comply with such directions of 
the general railroad commissioners, shall forfeit 
and pay to the treasurer of this state twenty dol- 
lars a day for each day of such neglect or refusal. 
No railroad company whose trains may be re- 
quired to stop at or near any village, as provided 
in the foregoing section, shall charge more than 
five cents for each mile and fraction of a mile on 
passengers between such village and the next near- 
est station. 

In Addition, July 31«f, 1868. * 

Sect. 1. Whenever any railroad company in Application may 
this state shall refuse to stop any one or more of^"^" court 
its passemrer trains at any depot on the line of its* 00 """? 61 ™!- 

•\ 3 m /».. . road companies 

railroad, anyjnumber of citizens not less than ten, to stop their 



288 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



passenger trains 
at any depot on 
its line. 



Such application 
how heard and 
decided. 



Acceptance or 
rejection of the 
report of the 
committee. 



Order, how en- 
forced. 



Costs. 



of the town or city in which such depot is situated, 
may make their application in writing to the supe- 
rior court in the county where such depot is 
located, and if said court is not in session to any 
judge of the superior court or of the supreme court 
of errors, praying that said company may be or- 
dered to stop the train or trains mentioned in said 
application at said depot. 

Sect. 2. Said application shall be heard and 
decided by a committee of three judicious and dis- 
interested persons, to be appointed by said court 
or said judge, as» the case may be, at such time 
and place, and with such notice to those interested 
as said court or judge shall order, and said appli- 
cation shall be served at least six days before the 
session of the court or the return day named in 
said application, and if said committee, being first 
duly sworn, shall be of opinion, in view of all the 
facts and circumstances, that said application 
ought to be granted in whole or in part, they may 
issue an order to said company directing said com-. 
pany to stop their train or trains in the manner 
prescribed in said order, or said committee may 
make such other order and grant such other relief 
in the premises as to them shall seem just and 
reasonable, and shall make return of their doings 
to the next term of the superior court in said 
county. 

Sect. 3. Upon the return of the report of said 
committee of their doings, to said court, either 
party may object to the acceptance of the same for 
any irregularity or improper conduct, and the 
court for such cause may set it aside and order a rc- 
liearing, but if the court accept and establish the 
same it sliall be conclusive in the matter, and it 
shall be the duty of said company to obey said 
order. 

Sect. 4. Said order may be enforced by man- 
damus at the relation of either party, and the 
costs of said proceeding may be taxed by said com- 
mittee against either or both of said parties at 
their discretion. 



i8<i3. Sect. 501. Every railroad company, after its 

oil-may tRe?* hue of road shall have been located, approved and 
the location of established, may so far alter the location of such 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 289 

road as to change the radius of its curves, straighten ,heir . roads for 

, . 'if -Ti i , , n i , certain purposes. 

and improve its hues, width and extent ot depot 
grounds, slopes and embankments, and extend its 
lines of sight, when such changes arc approved by 
the railroad commissioners : a certificate of which 

i ii-ii i •• in Certificates to be 

changes, duly signed by such commissioners, shall lodged. 
be lodged in the town clerk's office, in the town or 
towns where such changes are made. 

Sect. 502. If, in making such alterations, it Wuon and how 
shall be deemed necessary, in the opinion of the taken by ap - 
railroad commissioners, to take land to which such p 
company has not obtained a title, and over which 
it owns no right of way, and said company cannot 
agree with the owner or owners thereof, in re- 
gard to the amount of damages to be paid there- 
for, such company shall pay therefor such damages 
as shall be estimated and determined by apprais- 
ers, to be appointed by the superior court in the 
county where such land is situated, or by some 
judge of said court in vacation, after first giving 
to the owner or owners of such land, such notice 
of the time and place of hearing such application 
as said court or judge shall deem reasonable. Said 
appraisers, after being sworn, shall personally ex- 
amine the land so proposed to be taken, and hear 
the parties in regard to the value thereof, at such 
time and place as the said appraisers may desig- 
nate and appoint ; and their appraisement, when 
made, shall be in writing, signed by such apprais- 
ers and returned by them to the clerk of the supe- 
riorcourt for the county where such land is situ- 
ated, who shall record the same. The expenses 
so incurred shall be paid by such railroad com- 
pany, or by such land owner or owners, or shall 
be equitably apportioned between them, as said 
appraisers shall direct; and the amount of dam- Damages to be 
ages so appraised shall be paid to such owner or before r usmg S1 the 
owners, or deposited with the clerk of said court, land - 
for (he benefit of such owner or owners, within 
sixty days after such appraisement is made ; and 
until such money is paid or deposited, such com- 
pany shall not use or prepare such land for the 
purposes aforesaid. 

Sect. 503. When any such railroad is in the Trustees or as- 
possession of the trustees of its bondholders, or of Jj^SThSrottw 
an assignee, or of a trustee in insolvency, the per- same p° wers > 
37 



290 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

*oratton hc c ° r ' sons so in possession shall have the some rights, 
powers and privileges as are conferred in the two 
next preceding sections, upon railroad companies ; 
and all expenses and damages incurred by such 
persons so in possession, in good faith, to improve 
the lines of the railroads so in their charge, shall 
be reimbursed to them from the earnings of such 
railroad, while they have the possession thereof. 
NotiJto'L giv Sect. 504. Before the railroad commissioners 
^/ a ^ h b e e ^' crs shall approve the laying out of any railroad, or 
commissioners the taking of any land for the purposes of said 
olirrldhmi'.or road, or any change or alteration of the same, they 
taking hmd.r s i m n give reasonable notice to the owner of such 
land to attend and be heard ; and the appraisers 
shall cause a like notice to be given to the owners 
of the land taken, or proposed to be taken ; and if 
the owner of any such land resides without this 
State, any judge of the superior court may pre- 
scribe the notice which may be given to him. 
commoner. Sect. 505. No railroad, or part of any railroad, 
shaii give a cer- sna u ue opened for public travel, unless the rail- 

tificate before r r . . _ ■ 

railroad shall be road company shall first obtain a ccrtincate, 

opened. signed by a majority of the railroad commissioners, 

that said road is in a suitable condition for the safe 

operation of engines and cars thereon. 

is«- Sect. 506. Every person who shall, after said 

ingOTdrrring"* 1 " railroad is opened for use, ride, drive, or lead any 

animals on rail- j^^ ^ ^^ ^^ upQn the track Q f sucn roa d, 

except for the purpose of crossing the same, with- 
out the consent of the railroad company, or its 
agents, shall, for every such offense, forfeit a sum 
not exceeding one hundred dollars, and shall also 
be liable for all damages thereby sustained by any 
person, to be recovered in an action on the case. 

In Addition, June SQth, 1866. 

Footways upon Whenever it shall be the opinion of the select- 
how^Sd 3 men of any town or towns, or of the common coun- 
cil of any city in this State, that a loot way upon 
the line of any railroad bridge or causeway within 
the limits of such town or city would be of public 
convenience, and the railroad company owning 
sucb bridge or causeway shall not consent thereto, 
such selectmen or common council may call out 
the railroad commissioners, who, after due notice 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 291 

to such railroad company, shall proceed to inquire 
into the facts, at the expense of such town or city. 
And if the railroad commissioners shall, upon 
such hearing, find that a footway along such 
bridge or causeway would be of public convenience 
or accommodation, they shall authorize such town 
or towns, or city, to construct and maintain the 
same at their own expense, and to attach the same 
for support to such bridge or causeway ; provided, 
that such footway shall be constructed entirely 
outside of the bridge or causeway to which it is at- 
tached, and shall be so constructed, used'and main- 
tained as not to interfere with the necessary and 
proper use of such bridge or causeway by such rail- 
road company. 

Sect. 507. Every railroad company may estab- RaiIway C T, P ,?\. 

...„., , . J a , ,, r n J ny may establish 

hsh, tor its sole benefit, a toll upon all passengers toils, on passen- 
and property conveyed or transported on its rail- IT an relg ' 
road, at such rates as may be determined by the 
directors of the company, and may fix the time 
and departure of trains, and regulate the convey- 
ance, and transportation, and weight of loads, and 
all other matter and things in relation to the use 
of such road, as the directors may determine, and 
such company shall carefully consult the safety, 
convenience, and comfort of its passengers, and 
shall adopt such rules for the government of its 
superintendents, conductors, agents, and servants, 
regarding the reception, bestowment, transporta- 
tion, and delivery of passengers and luggage as 
shall be necessary for that purpose ; and when two 
roads meet at the same terminus, or when they 
intersect each other, the railroad commissioners 
shall, at the request of the directors of either of 
said roads, prescribe such regulations relative to 
the exchange and reception of passengers and lug- 
gage as they deem best, and the said railroad com- 
panies, their officers and agents shall be governed 
thereby.* 

Sect. 508. No railroad company, which has isgs. 
had a system of commutation fares in force for S2 1 S5ui>M«* 8 " 



*May establish one rate for those procuring tickets, and another for those pay- 
ing on the cars. Crocker vs. N. L., W. & I'. K. It. Co., 24 C. It., 249. 



292 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



or°!utcrfng b eom- niore than four years, shall abolish, alter, or uiod- 
mutation, when, ify the same, except for tlie regulation of the price 
charged for such commutation ; and such price shall, 
in no case, be raised to an extent that shall alter 
the ratio, as it existed on the 1st day of July, 
1865, between such commutation and the ratestben 
charged for way fare, on the railroad of such com- 
pany. 

In addition, July 19/A, 1867. 

fraudulently That whoever fraudulently evades or attempts 

evading pajment to evade the payment of any toll or fare lawfully 
established by a railroad corporation, cither by 
giving a false answer to the collector of the toll or 
fare, or by travelling beyond the point to which he 
has paid the same, or by leaving the train, with- 
out having paid the toll or fare established for the 
distance traveled, or otherwise, shall be punished 
by fine of not less than five or more than twenty 
dollars for each offense. Whoever does not upon 
demand, first pay such toll or fare, shall not be 
entitled to be transported over any railroad. Pro- 
rroviso.j vided, that conductors or employees of railroad 

companies shall not put a passenger off from trains 
between stations. 
corporTo'n may Sect. 501) - Evcl 7 railroad company may bor- 
bormw money, row money at any rate of interest, not exceeding 

and issue bonds , i i • 11 

therefore. seven percent, per annum, payable semi-annually, 

and may secure the repayment of the same by its 
bonds, with or without its corporate seal, signed 
by its president, and countersigned by its treas- 
urer, with or without coupons or certificates of in- 
terest, due at the end of every six months, attached 
thereto ; but before being issued, said bonds shall 
be registered in the office of the comptroller of 
public accounts, and a certificate thereof shall ap- 
pear on the face of each bond ; and the comptroller 
shall, upon the application of the company, cancel 
any bonds, so by him registered, which may be 
brought to him for that purpose, and shall enter 
said act of canceling in his register ; but no rail- 
road company shall issue any bond of a less de- 
nomination than one hundred dollars, nor shall 
any such company have bonds outstanding at any 
one time, to a greater amount than one-third of 



1850. 1857. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

the sum which its president and chief engineer 
shall certify, under oath, to the comptroller, has 
been actually expended upon its road ; and any 
false swearing in this matter shall render the 
offender liable to be punished for the crime of per- 
jury ; and the comptroller shall not permit the 
bonds of any railroad company, registered in his 
office, and uncanceled, to exceed the amount limi- 
ted in this section.* 

Sect. 510. Any railroad company may sell, or Ria^d con 
dispose of, its bonds, legally issued, at such times, j£ n m ^' sellits 
and on such terms as shall be authorized by its 
stockholders, at a legal meeting called for "that pur- 
pose. 

Sect. 511. The company may, by a vote of the M J My be 
stockholders, at a meeting called for that purpose, mortgaged tose- 
secure said bonds by a mortgage of its railroad/" 
and all its property, rights and franchises under 
its charter, or any part thereof, by deed duly exe- 
cuted by its president, under the corporate seal, 
to the treasurer of the State, and his successors 
in office, in trust for the holders of said bonds, 
and recorded in the office of the secretary of this 
State. 

Sect. 512. Whenever any railroad company „ ., *848. 

.... . J - . mi Railroad compa- 

sliall have mortgaged or conveyed its railroad, or ny to surrender 
railroad property, or any part thereof, to any per- erty'fo^rustoST 
son, in trust, for the security of its bondholders, &c,when - 
or other creditors, or for the security of any class 
of such bondholders or creditors, and shall have 
made default in the payment of principal or inter- 
est, due to such creditors, according to contract, 
any such creditor may prefer his petition to the 
superior court, in any county in which such rail- 
road, or any part thereof, is located, setting forth 
such fact, and praying that the trustee, for the 
benefit of such bondholders or creditois, may be 
placed in the possession of such mortgaged prop- 
erty, for the benefit of such creditors, and such 
petition shall be heard and determined at the first 
term of the court to which it is returnable, unless 
continued for reasonable cause ; and if the allega- 
tions thereof are found true, such court shall 

•Various points as to liability of B. I!. Companies upon their bonds. Crosby 
TO. N. L., W. & P. K. B. Co., 26 C. R., 121. 



Trust estate lin- 
ble for acts of 



294 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

order and decree that the said corporation, and 
Liability of trus- the president and directors thereof, under a suita- 

FCC 111 l")OS3PSSlOIl - 

of railroad, &c, ble penalty, shall surrender such mortgaged prop- 
erty to the trustee, for the benefit of such creditors. 
Sect. 513. Whenever any such trustee shall 
have taken possession of any railroad, or railroad 
property, in pursuance of the provisions of the next 
preceding section, or in pursuance of any authority 
contained in the mortgage or deed of trust, he 
shall take charge of and operate such railroad or 
railroad property, for the benefit of the creditors 
for whom such trust was created, and he shall not 
be personally liable for any cause or injury arising 
from the operation of such road, or while he may 
operate the same, except for his willful misman- 
agement, or for any contracts made by him as 
such trustee ; but all such railroad property shall 
be liable for the acts and proceedings of such 

trustee. trustee in the execution of his trust, to the extent 

of the interest of the trustee of the bondholders, 
or creditors, for whose benefit such trustee may 
act ; and any action or other proceeding, for the 
purpose of making the said property liable, shall 
be brought against such trustee, describing him as 
such. 

Trustee to make Sect. 514. The trustee, upon taking posses- 

au inventory ami . i c 

where lodged, sion ot such property, shall make an inventory ot 
all the property which may have come into his 
possession, so far as the same shall be known to 
him, under oath, and shall lodge the same for 
record in the office of the secretary of this state : 
and if any other property shall, from time to time 
be discovered by him, he shall make a like inven- 
tory, under oath, and lodge the same for record as 
aforesaid. 
Trustee to ren- Sect. 515. The trustee shall, from time to 
countTto'secre- time, while operating such road, render his 
tary of state. account quarterly into the office of the secretary 
of this state, of all moneys received or disbursed 
by him, in the course of his agency ; and he may 
proceed at his discretion in the superior court, in 
any county in which such railroad or any part 
SKEhoider.! thereof is located to foreclose the said railroad 
company, and all subsequent incumbrances, for 
the use of the bondholders, or other creditors for 
whom he acts ; and such superior court may limit 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 295 

the time for the redemption of the mortgaged 
property, as in the ordinary proceedings for the 
foreclosure of real property. 

Sect. 516. If such trustee shall neglect his Superior court 
duties or unnecessarily delay to perform the same, trustee for cause, 
any creditor represented by such trustee, may ap- th er ipp ° int aD ~ 
ply to any superior court aforesaid, for the remo- 
val of such trustee, which application shall be 
heard at the first term of said court ; and upon 
such facts being found true, such court may re- 
move the trustee from his office, and appoint 
another in his stead, and at its discretion may, 
upon the application of any such bondholder or 
creditor, remove a trustee and fill the vacancy. , 

Sect. 517. Nothing in the five next preceding j^^'^f °? 
sections of this, act shall affect any mortgage, incumbrancers, 
trust, or lien upon the property foreclosed, which fccted. 
was created prior to the mortgage, trust, or lien, 
under which the said trustee may act ; but the 
trustee for all such prior incumbrancers may pro- 
ceed, by foreclosure or otherwise, notwithstanding 
any act or proceeding by subsequent incumbran- 
cers, or their trustees. 

Sect. 518. The expenses of operating such Bx i )ensesofroad > 
railroad or other property, including repairs and pensation of 
all other reasonable expenses of the trustee, and bTal'duaed' '° 
any damages incurred for any injury sustained from earnings - 
while in the execution of said trust, and all claims 
secured by any prior mortgages or incumbrances, 
which shall have become due and payable before 
or during the time he is executing his trust, and 
also a reasonable compensation to be allowed to 
the trustee, by the superior court, shall be first 
deducted from the earnings of the road before any 
part of such earnings shall be paid to the bond- 
holders or other creditors. 

Sect. 519. Every railroad company shall run M59. 1864. 

• , i o , i Railroad compa- 

lts trains eacli way tor passengers at such times nies to -.ironi 
and in such manner as to afford reasonable facili- Tc^tL pat'l'iT 
ties for receiving passengers from and delivering s er8 ' 
them to the other railroads in this state, connected 
therewith ; and whenever the business connections 
of the railroad of any railroad company with the 
railroad of any other railroad company, are not 
convenient and reasonable for the accommodation 
of passengers over said road, said company shall 



296 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

make such connections as the public travel and 

business may require. 
Party aggtieved Sect. 520. Any person who shall be aggrieved 
by neglect of by- the neglect or refusal of any railroad company 

railroad compa- 1 i • J i • i j 

ny to make con- to make such connections, as the public travel and 

nection, may pe- i • • xi • 1 1 • 

titioua judge of business may require, in the manner provided in 
court! perior the preceding section, may prefer a petition to any 
judge of the superior court, who is not a resident 
of the county in which the grievance complained of 
exists, which petition, shall be served upon the re- 
spondents at least twelve days before the same 
is made returnable ; and said judge shall hear the 
parties, if they shall appear, and, if in his judg- 
pomTa commit-' meut a "ccessity exists therefor, shall appoint a 
tee to make hi- committee to inquire into the allegations of the 

u 11 i i* v 

petition, who, after such reasonable notice to the 
respondents to appear and answer before such 
committee as such judge shall order, shall pro- 
ceed to a hearing on such petition, and shall 
report the fact found by them to said judge ; and, 
if the committee shall find the allegations in the 
petition to be true, such judge shall order that 
such company or companies shall make such con- 
nection, on penalty of not less than fifty dollars 
for each day that such company or companies 
shall neglect or refuse to obey such order. 

howpiid pHl,lon ' Sect. 521. Whenever any such order shall be 
made, the respondent or respondents shall pay the 
costs of the application, which shall be taxed by 
the judge who shall make such order, but if the 
judge shall refuse to make such order the petitioner 
shall pay such costs. 

what snail not Sect. ~v22. Nothing in the three preceding sec- 
tions of this act shall be construed to authorize 
the merger of any railroad companies, or to 
authorize any railroad company to lease its road to 
any other such company. 

Tmni/roads to Sect 523. When the railroad of any company 

afford equal forit- being a trunk road, shall, at or near the same 

lties in exchan- o • . i • 1 

gesot passengers, place, connect with, or be intersected by, two or 
roaiU wXS fa- 8 more other railroads, which are competing lines 
tersect their ime. j- Q1 . t j ic business to or from such trunk railroad, 
equal facilities, including price and rates, shall be 
afforded by the company operating said trunk 
road to each of said competing roads, and to the 
managers, officers, servants, agents thereof, in the 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 297 

interchange of cars, and transportation of freight 
as well as in ticketing of passengers and checking 
of baggage. 

Sect. 524. If any such competing railroad *j"™t r c 8 °?n 
company shall, at any time, deem itself aggrieved complaint' &c, 

1 ^ J , J P .,.,. ,, PD to prescribe reg- 

m relerence to such lacilities, the managers 01 uianon* tor se- 

i • j 1 • V curing reisona- 

such aggrieved company may complain to any ble ,- a * ilitieS) &c . 
judge of the superior court residing in any county 
in which any part of said trunk road shall be 
located, therein stating the grounds or causes of 
complaint ; and thereupon said complaint having 
been duly served on the company or companies 
complained of, pursuant to the order of said judge, 
shall be heard by the railroad commissioners, at 
such time and place as said judge shall order and 
direct; and said commissioners, having examined 
into the alleged grievances, shall prescribe such 
regulations as will, in their judgment, secure rea- 
sonable facilities for the accommodation of the 
business of each of said railroads, so connecting 
with each other, pursuant to the provisions of this 
act, and said commissioners shall also fix the 
terms and conditions on which such facilities shall 
be afforded by or to each of said railroad compa- 
nies ; and the doings of said commissioners, when 
returned to and approved by said judge, shall be 
binding upon the parties ; and the superior court, 
in either of the counties aforesaid, shall have power 
to compel the performance thereof by attachment, 
mandamus, or otherwise, and the expenses of the 
proceedings shall be paid by said parties, as shall 
be determined by said court. 

Sect. 525. Whenever it shall appear to the * 856 - 1859 - 

... . . . ' ' . . If goid cause ex 

railroad commissioners, by the written complaints, the commis- 
of the president or a majority of the directors of deTconneVtions 
any railroad company in this state, or of a majority t0 bemade > &c - 
of the selectmen of any town through which any 
railroad passes, that the business connections of 
any other railroad, connected with such railroad, 
are not convenient and reasonable for the accom- 
modation of the inhabitants on the line of such 
road, said commissioners shall forthwith cause a 
notice, as is provided in the four hundred and 
sixty-ninth section of this act, to be given to such 
railroad company, and ail other parties interested, 
specifying the time and place of hearing such 
38 



298 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

complaint by said commissioners, and, on such 
hearing, if good and sufficient cause exist, they 
shall give such relief and make such regulations 
in relation thereto, as, in their judgment, will be 
for the best interest of all parties concerned ; and 
any railroad company refusing or neglecting to 
comply with such regulations, shall forfeit to the 
treasurer of the state the sum of twenty-five dol- 
lars for each day of such refusal or neglect. 
Kaiiroad 64 c'om P a Sect. 526. Every railroad company which sball 
dHnkhi^water run cars ^ or ^ ne conve y an ce of passengers, sball, 
for passengers, from the first day of May until the first day of 
November, annually, while conveying passengers, 
carry on each passenger car a suitable quantity 
and quality of good drinking water, or shall cause 
the same to be carried through such car at least 
once in each sixty minutes during the time said 
car shall be running over its road with passengers 
on board, for the free use of the passengers in 
such car, and shall furnish suitable and conven- 
ient appurtenances for carrying said water, with a 
clean glass tumbler for using the same ; and any 
Penalty for ne gl ra ilroad company refusing or neglecting to com- 
ply with the requirements of this section, shall 
forfeit the sum of twenty-five dollars, to be recov- 
ered in an action on this statute, by any person 
who shall sue therefor, and prosecute his suit to 
effect. 

In Addition, July 26^, 1867. 

St" to ad mlKi* Sect. 1- That eac1 ' railroad company owning 

water closets at or operating any line of railroad in this state, 

station. ge shall, on or before the first day of September next, 

provide and thereafter*maintain at each passenger 

station upon their respective railroads, suitable 

waier-closets for the accommodation of passengers, 

penalty for neg-and for each neglect or refusal to comply with the 

provisions of this act, shall forfeit the sum of one 

hundred dollars, one half to him who shall sue 

therefor and prosecute his suit to effect, and the 

other half to the treasury of this state. 

wMoC??* Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the railroad 

the matter. commissioners to see that the provisions of this 

act are enforced. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 299 



In Addition, June ZOth, 1866. 
Sect. 1. It shall be the duty of the railroad cards designat- 

, . * iii- ,n 8 trams and 

companies ot tins state to cause to be placed indirection-, to be 

a conspicuous manner, upon the outside of each pIaced 0Q car8 ' 

pas enger car of each of their passenger trains 

which leave any station at the termini of their 

own roads or any other road, a legible card or 

cards, not less than three feet in length, with 

large letters, designating way trains from express 

trains, and the direction in which the trains are 

to move. 

Sect. 3. Any railroad company neglecting to Penalty for neg- 
comply with the provisions of the preceding section eot ' 
after the first day of August, 1866, shall be liable 
to pay a penalty of ten dollars for each and every 
day of such neglect. 

Sect. 3. The railroad commissioners are hereby p roT i8o. 
authorized to release any railroad company from 
compliance with the provisions of this act, when- 
ever, in their opinion, the convenience of the pub- 
lic does not require it. 

• 

Sect. 527. All the conductors, brakemen, and 1856. 
baggage-men, employed upon the passenger trains ^oTraUroa^" 
of any railroad company in this state, shall wear, c ° m panies to 

J tr J . ill wear badges. 

when on duty, in a conspicuous place, a badge or 
mark denoting their respective duties, and the 
company by whom they are employed. 

Sect. 528. Whenever any passenger shall be 1848. 
separated from his baggage by the regulation ofenforbagga^f,^* 
any railroad company, said company shall give to &c ' 
such passenger a receipt or check for his baggage 
at the time of receiving it, unless such passenger 
shall waive the right to such receipt or check ; 
and every company which shall not give such re- 
ceipt or check as aforesaid, shall pay to the person 
whose baggage is so received, the sum of ten dol- 
lars, which may be recovered in an action of 
debt.* 



* As to nature of check, and liability of railroad companies for baggage, Hickox 
vs. Naugatuck R. R. Co., 31 C. R.,281. 



300 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



In Addition, July 11th, 1867. 

Railroad compa- Whenever any person shall deliver to anv rail- 
Dies to n-ceipt j , . 

for freight. road company any goods, wares, merchandise, or 
other commodity for transportation, such company 
shall give to the owner or shipper thereof, a receipt 
for the same, describing the goods, wares, mer- 
chandise, or commodity so received for transport- 
ation, and every company winch shall refuse to 
give a receipt as herein provided, shall pay to the 
person entitled to the same the sum of fifty dol- 
lars, which may be recovered in an action of debt. 

1865 -^ Sect. 529. No minor shall climb, jump, step, 

Minors prohibit- j ,. . . ' •> r ' r' 

ed from climbing, or stand upon, or cling to, or in any way attach 
&c, upon cars. hi mse lf to ; any engine or car, either stationary or 
in motion, upon any part of the track of any rail- 
road, unless in so doing he shall be acting in com- 
pliance with, and by permission of, the lawful 
rules and regulations of the company then owning 
or managing said railroad. 
Agent of railroad Sect. 530. Whenever any station agent, freight 

companies to . a . J ° , fe 

make complaint, agent, or other officer or agent of any railroad 
company, employed to transact at or near any 
railroad station, any part of the business of said 
company, shall know, or have immediate and reli- 
able information, that at, or near said station any 
person has violated either of the provisions of the 
preceding section, and has thereby endangered 
himself, or caused reasonable alarm to others, said 
officer or agent shall, without unnecessary delay, 
make complaint of said offence, against such per- 
son to a grand juror of the town in which said 
offense shall have been committed, or to some 
other officer in said town, having authority to 
prosecute for said offence ; and thereupon said 
grand juror or other prosecuting officer shall 
forthwith prosecute said offender for said offence. 

parents shaii Sect. 531. Every parent or other person hav- 

prevent children . . . . ,. ., . ,, 

from loitering at ing legal control of any child, shall use at all 

™tr^ck. stat '° Q times the utmost reasonable care and diligence to 

prevent said child from unnecessarily loitering or 

lingering' at, or near, any railroad station or rail- • 

road track, and to prevent said child at all times 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 301 

from being unnecessarily at or near any such sta- 
tion or track at all, except while under the imme- 
diate care of some adult person. 

Sect. 532. Every person who shall violate any violation of 
of the provisions of the three preceding sections Jjj^f^ 1 ' 8 
shall be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dol- P unished - 
lars, or by imprisonment in a common jail for a 
period not exceeding thirty days, or by such fine 
and imprisonment both. 

Sect. 533. The railroad commissioners shall, commissioners 

. , . , . , . , to post copies. 

without unnecessary delay, cause printed copies ot 
the four preceding sections of this act to be posted 
in conspicuous places at all railroad stations in 
this state, and shall cause such copies to be at all 
times kept so posted at said stations. 

In Addition, July 21th, 1867. 

Sect. 1. No person shall climb, jump, step orenmbing, &c, 

. ,*. . " , , l . on railroad cars 

stand upon, or cling to, or in any way attach him- or engines, or oc- 
self to any engine or car, either stationary or inl^^^Lry 
motion, upon any part of the track of any railroad '^Vof Ul tr, r ecom- 
or occupy the platform or any part of the depot pany, prohibited, 
grounds thereof, unless in so doing he shall be 
acting in compliance with and by permission of the 
lawful rules and regulations of the company own- 
ing or managing said railroad. 

Sect. 2. Every parent or other person having Min . nra 'o b0 re - 

!/»• in li- strained from 

legal control ot any minor, shall use at all times, loitering near 

■ I i , ii j j"'i" j. railroad stations 

the utmost reasonable care and diligence to pre- or tracks, 
vent said minor from unnecessary loitering or lin- 
gering at or near any railroad station, or railroad 
track, and to prevent said minor at all times from 
being unnecessarily at or near any such station or 
track at all, except while under the immediate 
care of some alult person. 

Sect. 3. Any person who shall violate any of Penalty, 
the provisions of this act shall be liable to be pro- 
ceeded against in the same manner, and shall be 
subject to the same punishment as is provided in 
the General Statutes, title VII, chapter VII, sec- 
tions five hundred thirty and five hundred thirty- 
two of an act concerning Communities and Corpo- 
rations. 

Sect. 4. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent Repeal. 
herewith are hereby repealed. 



302 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



An Act Relating to Railroad Stations. ' 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives in General Assembly convened : 

pi^eTmfe^h 156 Sect. 1. All railroad companies owning or 
railroad passen- us { n g an y ]j ne or Hues of railroad in this state, 

ger station. ,, • 1 i i 

shall cause to be conspicuously placed on the pas- 
senger depot building at each station the name of 
such station. 
c 3 ommifsio r ner S oad Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the railroad 
commissioners to require compliance with the 
terms of this act. 

i85i. Sect. 534. Every locomotive engine used upon 

be C °rovidIa\vita an y railroad in this state, shall be supplied with a 
beii and whistle. [ )e i[ f at. least thirty-five pounds weight, and with 
a suitable steam whistle*, which said bell and whistle 
shall be so attached to such engine as to be con- 
veniently accessible to the person running or con- 
trolling the motions of such engine for the 
purpose of sounding the same ; and if any railroad 
company shall permit any such engine to be run 
upon its road, or any road operated by it without 
such whistle and bell so attached thereto, in good 
order for use, and conveniently accessible as aloi e- 
said, such company shall forfeit to the treasurer of 
Penalty for neg- t hi s state the sum of one hundred dollars for each 
day that such engine shall be so run upon such 
road or any part thereof, to be recovered by an 
action of debt in the name of such treasurer. 
foutd'blnOT Sect. 535. Every person, running or control- 

whistiewben ]i n g the motions of any locomotive engine upon 
ways' n &c h!g " any railroad in this state, shall commence sound- 
ing the bell or steam whistle attached to such en- 
gine, whenever such engine shall be in motion and 
approaching, and within eighty rods of, the place 
where said railroad crosses any turnpike, highway, 
or street, upon the same level with such railroad, 
and shall keep such bell or whistle occasionally 
Liability of cor- sounding until such engine has crossed such turn- 
poration*. ^.^ highway, or street ; and the railroad company 
in whose employment such person so running or 
controlling the motion of such engine may be, 
shall pay all damages which may accrue to any 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 303 

person in consequence of the omission of such per- 
son, so running or controlling the motions of 
such engine, to comply with the provisions of this 
section ; and if any person shall be deprived of Forfeit „ rftincase 
life in consequence of such omission, such railroad °f death occ«r- 

* a ill 1D S Dv neglect or 

company shall forfeit the sum of one thousand dol- omission of en- 
lars to the widow of such person, if there besuch glnee 
widow, and if there be no widow, to the children 
of such person, and if there be neither widow or 
children, then to the nearest relatives of such per- 
son, to be recovered by an action of debt on this 
statute. 

Sect. 536. Every person, running or control- ^° a ^ e f ° r gi Tiola - 
ling the motions of any locomotive engine, on any n« ers . &c - 
railroad in this state, who shall violate the provis- 
ions of the next preceding section of this act, shall 
forfeit for every such violation, the sum of twenty- 
five dollars to the treasurer of the town in which 
the offense is committed ; and any railroad com- 
pany that shall, knowingly, employ any engineer, 
who has been twice convicted of violating the pro- 
visions of said section, shall forfeit the sum of 
five hundred dollars, to be recovered by an action 
of debt on this statute, or upon complaint or in- 
formation brought by an informing officer of such 
town. 

Sect. 537. No railroad company shall permit ^ De ^ r n s te t ° re_ 
anv person to run or drive any locomotive engine copies of this act, 

• i i i 1 • ■ and be sworn to 

over or upon any railroad belonging to or m pos- comply with its 
session of and operated by, such company, unless pr0Vlsl0ns " 
such person shall have first received a printed copy 
of this and the three next preceding sections of 
this act, and shall have been sworn before some 
justice of the peace, or other officer authorized to 
administer oaths, to a faithful compliance with Pen ? u y for ™ u - 

. . ' r road companies 

the provisions thereof ; and any railroad company violating these 
which shall violate the provisions of this section, proTIS10DS ' 
shall forfeit to the treasurer of this state the sum 
of fifty dollars, for each day that such person shall 
be so permitted to run or drive any locomotive 
engine as aforesaid, to be recovered by an action 
of debt, in the name of such treasurer. 

In Addition, June 22d, 1866. 

Sect. 1. That every railroad company convey- 



304 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

^prnvid C ed S with in S passengers in this state, shall provide their 

connecting passenger, baggage, mail, and express cars, with a 

proper and suitable connecting apron, of the full 

width of the track attached to the platform of their 

cars, so as to enable persons to pass from car to 

. a car with safety. 

aprons how Sect. 2. The connecting aprons shall be of a 

material and pattern that shall meet the approval 
of the general railroad commissioners. 

penalty. Sect. 3. Any railroad company not complying 

with the provisions of this act on or before the first 
day of September, 1866, shall forfeit to the treas- 
urer of this state one hundred dollars for each and 
every day of said neglect, said penalty to be recov- 
ered in an action upon this statute. 

Exception Sect. 4. Nothing herein contained shall re- 

quire any railroad company to provide an apron 
between the platform of any freight or baggage 
car and the platform of a passenger car attached 
to a freight train. 

In Addition, June 6th, 1867. 

use of the "Ex- Sect. 1. That every railroad company in this 

paosion Safet*- . . . . , K, . . • , 

Bridge "to be state which has heretotore placed upon its cars, 
pntncewuTthe and continued to keep the same on with the ap- 
Actofi866. probation of the railroad commissioners, the de- 
vice or mechanism known as the " Expansion 
Safety Bridge," or any other similar device, shall be 
deemed to have complied with the Act entitled " An 
Act in addition to an Act concerning Railroads," 
passed at the May session, A. D. 1866, and ap- 
proved June twenty-second, A. D. 1866, and shall 
not be liable to any of the penalties in said act pro- 
vided. 

Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

In Addition, August 1st, 1872. 

Theuseofthe Sect. 1. Tliat every railroad company in this 
by'ranroLd^com state which has heretofore placed upon its cars, or 
panies author- s h a ll hereafter, with the approbation of the rail- 
road commissioners, place upon its. cars the device 
or mechanism known as the Miller Platform, shall 
be deemed to have complied with the act entitled 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 305 

An act concerning railroads, passed at the May 
session, A. D. 1866, and approved June 22d, A. 
D. i860, and shall not be liable to any of the pen- 
alties in said act provided. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect from its 
passage. 

Sect. 538. All passenger trains, run upon any, 1853 - ' 

., i • .1 . 1 i» 1 , Passenger trams 

railroad in this state, which crosses any stream or to st« P before 
harbor by a drawbridge, or which intersects and Sridporndbwd 
crosses, or is intersected and crossed by any other crossing 
railroad, shall be brought to a full stop, at a dis- 
tance not less .than two hundred feet, nor more 
than one thousand feet, from the draw in every 
such bridge, and the point of intersection and 
crossing of such road, and in plain sight of the 
same, before such draw or crossing is passed, or 
attempted to be passed, by any such train; but 
the railroad commissioners may authorize the pass- 
ing of any draw or any railroad crossing, without commissioners 
stopping as aforesaid, by a writing, signed by a "^jn^wukout 
majority of them, whenever in their opinion, the s^pp^s- 
same can be done consistently with the public 
safety. 

Sect. 539. Every engine-man running such Pe " alty for Ti °- 

. * O ° lation. 

train, who shall violate the provisions of the next 
preceding section, shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding one hundred dollars, or by imprison- 
ment in a common jail for a term not exceeding 
three months ; and the president and directors of 
any railroad company who shall knowingly per- 
mit any passenger train upon their road to be run 
over any such draw or crossing, without first, mak- 
ing the stop prescribed in the next preceding 
section, shall forfeit the sum of five hundred dol- 
lars, to be recovered by them by an action of debt 
upon this statute, one-half to him who shall prose- 
cute to effect, and the other half to the treasury 
of the state ; and the personal service of the writ 
in said action, upon any one or more of them, 
who may be residents of, or found within, this 
state, shall be sufficient service to bring all of them 
to trial. 

Sect. 540. All railroad trains, which are _ 5 1865 - . 
obliged to come to a full stop before crossing any to stop at nearest 
drawl nidge, shall, whenever the railroad commis- to 8 a drawbridge. 
sioners shall so order, be brought to such a full 
39 



306 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

stop at the regular station, nearest to such draw- 
bridge, for a sufficient length of time to accommo- 
date passengers who may desire to enter or leave 
said trains at said station, if said station is in full 
view of said drawbridge, and not more than one 
hundred and twenty rods therefrom. 
1853. 1*56. Sect. 541. No railroad company shall run, or 

Not to permit a ., \ 

train to run over permit any passenger train to be run, over any 
fell'thert'bea 11 switch, at any railroad junction of two or more 
switchman at different roads, or at any station wbere such train 

junction, &c. .' . » 

does not regularly stop or is not then to be stop- 
ped, unless there be, at the time when such train 
shall arrive near any such switch, a switchman 
standing at such junction switch, or the station 
switch so first approached, with a white flag by day 
or a light in the night, to indicate that such 
switches are in a proper position for the passage of 
such train, or unless, in the absence of such switch- 
men, said train shall be first brought to a full stop, 
at a distance of not less than two hundred feet. 
nor more than seven hundred feet therefrom ; and 
Penalty for vio- every engine-man, who shall run a train over any 
lation by engine- suc \\ switch contrary to the provisions of this sec- 
tion, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding 
one hundred dollars, or imprisonment in a com- 
mon jail for a term not exceeding sixty days, or 
by such fine and imprisonment both ; and the 
president and directors of any railroad company, 
penalty for vio- who shall knowingly suffer and permit such train 
tatmdfatt. to be run over any such switch, contrary to the 
ors. provisions of this section, shall forfeit the sum of 

• five hundred dollars, to be recovered in an action 
of debt, on this statute, one half to him who shall 
prosecute to effect, and the other half to the treas- 
ury of the state ; and the service of the writ, in 
the manner prescribed in the five hundred and 
thirty-ninth section of this act, shall be sufficient 
service to enable the plaintiff to maintain said ac- 
tion against all of them ; but the railroad commis- 
sioners may dispense with such switchmen, at 
such places on any railroad where, in the opinion 
of such commissioners, other equally safe signals 
and protections are provided. 
Number of toke Sect. 542. Upon every train run, or intended 
menon train. t De run? U p n any railroad in this state, at a 
greater average speed than thirty miles an hour, be- 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 307 

tween stations, and consisting of more than two 
passenger cars, one brakeman shall be placed and 
kept at the brake of each car connected with such 
train ; and if any such train shall be run upon 
any road in this slate, without a brakeman, pro- 
vided and stationed at the brake of each car as 
aforesaid, the company owning or running such 
road, shall forfeit for each offense the sum of one^ ,tyforTioIa - 
hundred dollars, one-half to him who shall prose- 
cute to effect, and the other half to the treasury 
of the state, to be recovered in an action of debt 
on this statute ; but whenever the double-action 
brake is used on any such train, such corporation 
shall be required to place and keep but one brake- 
man at and to every two cars connected with such 
train. 

Sect. 543. If, in consequence of the in toxica- Loss $f^ &c 
tion, or any cross and willful misconduct or neo;- ensuing from in- 

.. ' "ii i /> i , • toxication, &c, 

ligence on tbe part oi any conductor, engineer, or of servant of cor- 
ofthe switch, bridge, or brake tender, or signal poration ' felony - 
man, or any other servants of such corporation, 
any loss of life, or the breaking of a limb, shall 
be caused, such servant or servants shall be 
deemed guilty of felony, and shall be punished by 
imprisonment in the state prison for a term not 
exceeding ten years. 

Sect. 544. If the life of any person, being a D j > , ma ? e3 for l0 f. s 

" f., . ' °. of lite from negh 

passenger or crossing upon a public higbway in g»nce of compa- 
the exercise of reasonable care, shall be lost by ny ' &c ' 
reason of the negligence or carelessness of any 
railroad company in this state or by the unfitness, 
or negligence, or carelessness, of its servants or 
agents, such railroad company shall be liable to 
pay damages not exceeding five thousand dollars, 
nor less than one thousand dollars, to the use of 
the executor or administrator of the deceased per- 
son, to be recovered by such executor, or admin- 
istrator, in an action on the case upon this statute, 
for the benefit of the husband, or widow and heirs 
of the deceased person, one moiety thereof to go 
to the husband, or widow, and the other to the 
children of the deceased, but if there shall be no 
children, the wliole shall go to the husband or 
widow, and if there is no husband or widow to the 
heirs, according to the law regulating the distri- 
bution of intestate personal estate. Every action Acti0n8 against 



308 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

nts r0 w1)cn in to a " brought upon this section , and every action brought 
take precedence, against any railroad company for injuries received, 
shall take precedence of all other civil cases, in 
any court in this state ; but no such action shall lie 
tried before the second term of the court before 
whicb it may be pending, and may be further con- 
tinued by such court for cause* 
corporation to Sect. 545. Every railroad company shall, 

give notice to » i 

commissioners of with in twenty-four hours after the occurrence of 

accidents. &c. . j , , j j -.i • 1 • • 

any accident attended with serious personal injury 
give notice of the same to the railroad commis- 
sioners, in writing, who, upon receiving such no- 
tice, or upon public rumor of such accident, may 
repair or dispatch one of their board to the scene 
of said accident, and inquire into the facts and 
circumstances thereof ; and any such company 
neglecting or wilfully omitting to give the notice 
aforesaid, shall be liable to a penalty of one hun- 
dred dollars for every day that such neglect or 
omission shall continue ; and the commissioners 
shall, without charge, furnish any person injured, 
or the friends of any person killed, any informa- 
tion they may have acquired in relation to any 
disaster, and the names of the persons from whom 
the same was obtained, or by whom the same may 
bo proved. 
Time wffhin Sect. 546. All suits or prosecutions, for any 

which certain violation of the provisions of the four hundred and 
brought, limited, seventieth, four hundred and seventy-second, five 
hundred and thirty-eighth, five hundred and thirty- 
ninth, five hundred and forty-first, five hundred 
and forty-second, five hundred and forty-third, fivo 
hundred and forty-fourth, and five hundred and 
forty-fifth sections of this act, shall be commenced 
within one year alter the cause of action shall 
have arisen. 

In Addition, July VMh, 1867. 

Limitation of ac- Sect. 1. No suit shall be hereafter brought or 
fo™os7on'iie geSniam taincd under or upon the five hundred and 
from negligence forty-fourth section of the act to which this act is 

* Insurance Company cannot recover of railroad company for money paid for 
loss of life caused by negligence. Conn. Mutual Life Ins. Co., vs. IS. Y. &N 
II. Railroad Co., 25 C.'lL, 265. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 309 

in addition, unless the same shall lie commenced °[™ e " road com " 
within eighteen months from and after the death 
of the person whose life has been or may be here- 
after destroyed in the manner described in said 
section. Provided, however, that in all cases where PrOTiso 
death has resulted from any of the causes men- 
tioned in said section and the remedy therefor is 
not barred by the statute of limitations, suits may 
be brought under said section to recover the dam- 
ages mentioned in said section at any time within 
six months from and after the time this act goes 
into operation, although more than eighteen 
months may have elapsed since the time of such 
death. 

Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent Repeal. 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

I\Ot to iffeCt 

Sect. 3. This act shall not affect any suit now pending suits. 
pending. 

In addition, July 21th, 1867. 

Sect. 1. The governor of this state is hereby Railroad and 

, i • i j -x ,1 i» , • steamboat police. 

authorized and empowered, upon the application 
of any railroad or steamboat company located in 
this state, to appoint, from time to time, as he may 
deem necessary, one or more persons who may be 
designated by such company, to act as policemen 
upon the premises, cars, or vessels of such com- 
pany : and he shall issue to every person so ap- 
pointed, a commission to act as such policeman. 

Sect. 2. Every policeman so appointed shall, f° ]icem ? nt0 

i f ■ jt c i • rf i take oath. 

betore entering upon the duties ot his office, take 
and subscribe the oalh contained in the tenth arti- 
cle of the constitution, which oath, so subscribed, 
with a copy of his commission, he shall file with 
the secretary of state, and a certificate that the 
same has been so filed, shall be lodged by the said 
secretary with the clerk of each county within 
which it is intended that the said policeman shall T^eirduty. 
act ; and it shall be lawful for such policeman, 
and it shall be their duty to arrest without previ-" 
ous complaint or warrant, all such persons as are 
guilty of drunkenness,, profane swearing, Sabbath 
breaking, vagrancy, disorderly conduct, tumultu- 
ous and offensive carriage, breaches of the peace, 
assaults and other oflenses, when such offenses 



310 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

shall be committed upon the premises, cars or ves- 
sels of the railroad or steamboat company for 
which such policeman shall have been appointed 
respectively ; and such offenders shall be taken 
in the act or on speedy information of others ; and 
it shall be lawful for any justice of the peace in the 

2nd°how trild ere county in which such offense may be committed, 
to proceed to trial and to render judgment without 
previous complaint and warrant upon persons so 
arrested, in the same "manner as if they had been 
arrested upon process issued by such justice ; pro- 
vided, that in all cases where exclusive jurisdiction 
of the offenses aforesaid is by law vested in police 
courts, when committed within certain limits, the 
said police courts shall continue to have such ex- 
clusive jurisdiction within said limits, and may 
exercise the same in the manner hereinbefore pre- 
scribed for justices of the peace ; and appeals shall 
be allowed in trials for said offenses in the same 
manner and to the same extent as is now, or may be 
hereafter provided by law in such trials ; and pro- 
vided further, that no person arrested as aforesaid 
shall be taken for trial out of the town where 
the offense is committed, unless the offense is com- 
mitted upon railroad cars propelled by steam, or 
steamboats when in motion. 

r.-a-e of police- Sect. 2. Every such policeman shall, at all 
times when on duty, wear in plain view a metallic 
shield with the words " Railway Police," or 
" Steamboat Police," as the case may be, and the 
name of the company for. which he is appointed 

Their compensa- ^g^bed thereon. The compensation of such po- 
liceman shall be paid by the companies for which 
they may be appointed respectively. 

How discharged Sect. 4. Whenever any such company shall no 

from office. longer require the services of any policeman ap- 
pointed as aforesaid, they shall file a notice to that 
effect with the secretary of state and the clerks of 
the several counties in whose offices the certifi- 
cates hereinbefore provided for were originally 
'filed, and thereupon the authority of such police- 
man shall cease. 

In Addition, July 8th, 1870. 

Railroad compa- Every railroad company in this state in making 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 311 

contracts for the* building of its road shall require nies to require 

. . . ? /. i security from 

sufficient security trom the contractors ior the pay- contractors for 
ment of all labor thereafter performed in con- uborers?and° f 
structing the road of such company by persons JSStoto ttiuL 
tn their employ, and such company shall be liable 00rers employed 
to the laborers employed for labor actually per- 
formed on the road ; but such liability shall not 
exist unless the person having such claims shall 
in writing notify the treasurer of said company 
that he has not been paid by the contractors, 
within twenty days after the completion of such 
labor. 

AN ACT CONCERNING CRIMES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Sect. 85. Every person who shall willfully and injuring railroad 

, . . . . . j, . engines, sc. 

maliciously impair, injure or destroy any engine, 
carriage or car, belonging to any railroad compa- 
ny, or who shall willfully and maliciously displace 
any switch upon any railroad, shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding one hundred and fifty dollars, 
or by imprisonment in a common jail not exceed- 
ing one year, or by such fine and imprisonment 
both. 

Sect. 192. Every president, director, secretary,,, . 1 ? 53 - . „ 

i i ii Embezzlement ot 

treasurer, book-keeper, conductor, clerk or agent funds of railroad 
of any railroad company incorporated by authority making fiiseen- 
of this state, who, while in the employment of such tnes - 
railroad company, shall take, purloin, secrete, or 
in any way appropriate to his use, or to the use of 
others, any of the moneys, coins, bills, notes, cred- 
its, or other choses in action, belonging to, or de- 
posited with such railroad company, with intent 
to defraud and prejudice any person or persons, or 
body politic or corporate, or who shall falsely make 
any entries of moneys, coins, bills, notes, credits, 
or other choses in action, in or upon any of the 
books of such railroad company, with intent to de- 
fraud and prejudice any person or body politic or 
corporate, shall suffer imprisonment in the Con- 
necticut state prison, for a term not less than two, 
nor more than ten years. 

In addition, June %0th, 1866. 

i Sect. 1. No person shall cast, empty, or dis- Nuisances on 



312 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

P il d r c oa ^ s tra r c ^ 30r charge, or cause, suffer, or permit to be cast, 

hibued. emptied, or discharged, upon or into that part of 

any railroad or railroad depot situated within the 
limits of any incorporated city in this state, any 
filth or rubbish, any foul or offensive wash or 
water, or the contents of any privy, vault, cess- 
pool, or sewer. 

penalty. Sect. 2. Every person who shall violate any 

of the provisions of this act, shall for each viola- 
tion be punished by a fine not exceeding fifty dol- 
lars, onc-h'ilf to go to the person furnishing the 
proper officer information that leads to a convic- 

Proviso. tion ; provided, that no person who now empties 

or discharges any sewer into or upon any such 
railroad-or depot, by virtue of a permission so to 
do from the proper authorities of the city wherein 
the same is done, shall for that cause be liable to 
said penalty until the expiration of three months 
after the passage of this act. 

AN ACT FOR THE REGULATION OP CIVIL ACTIONS. 

1857. Sect. 63. The bona fide owner and holder of 

Owner of railroad . . . 

bond may sue in a railroad bond may bring any proper action, in 
his own name, n i s own na me, for the recovery of whatever may 

be due thereon. 
.... law- . Sect. 169. In all. actions against any person, 

\\ tint prmm Tiici© . . • 1 f* , * 

evidence of inju- or against any incorporated company, lor the re- 
read! fiie ° r ra '' covery of damages on account of any injury to any 
property, whether real or personal, occasioned by 
fire communicated by any locomotive engine while 
upon or passing along any railroad in this state, 
the fact that such fire was so communicated, shall 
be full prima facie evidence, to charge with negli- 
gence the person or corporation, who shall, at the 
time of such injury by fire, be in the use and oc- 
cupation of such railroad, either as owner, lessee, 
or mortgagee, and also those who shall, at such 
time, have the care and management of such en- 
gine, unless such person or corporation shall show 
that no negligence was, at such time, justly 
chargeable to them or to those in their employ- 
ment. 
1856. Sect. 247. The levy of execution on the equit- 

on V property of ° n able right or interest which any railroad corpora- 
ny 'how made*" tiou may have in the whole or any part of the 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 313 

real estate, right of way, or road bed, of any other 
railroad corporation, together with the income 
rents, and profits which may be due or comino- 
due thereon, shall be by leaving a true and attested 
copy thereof, with the treasurer, secretary or 
clerk of said last-named railroad corporation, with 
an attested certificate by the officer making such 
levy, that he levies upon and takes such right of 
interest to satisfy such execution ; and thereupon 
such officer shall post the same upon some sign- 
post in the town where such last-named railroad 
corporation has its office or principal place of busi- 
ness in this state, and as in cases of personal pro- 
perty, shall, at vendue, sell the same, together 
with such income, rents, and profits, or so much 
ol them as shall be sufficient to satisfy said execu- 
tion ; and such officer shall thereupon give to the* 
purchaser an instrument in writing, conveying to 
him such right and interest, and shall also le°ave 
with such treasurer, secretary or clerk, a true and 
attested copy of such execution and of his return 
thereon ; and the purchaser shall thereupon be- 
come entitled to said right and interest, and to all 
rents, profits, and income thereon as such debtor 
was entitled to. 

AN ACT RELATING TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 

Sect. 12. No petition for the incorporation of imo. isre. 
a railroad company, or horse railroad commnv Notice of petition 

clinll K„ 1 lii »<"UUdU lAJIUpdliy, for incorporation 

snail be heard by the general assembly, unless ofrai ' roa , d . com - 
pubhc notice shall have been given, by advertise- 5&KSE, 
ment, in some newspaper published in the county t0 be &dvertised - 
where such railroad, or horse railroad, or some 
part thereof, is proposed to be located, or, if there 
be no newspaper published in such county, then in 
a newspaper published in an adjoining county, at 
least three weeks before the first day of the ses- 
sion in which such hearing is to be had, designat- 
ing the intended route of such railroad, and the 
street or streets, highway or highways, and other 
intended route of such horse railroad, with such 
certainty as to give reasonable notice to all persons 
interested therein, that their rights may be affected 
by the granting of said petition, and that they 
may have an opportunity to appear and object 



314 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

to be aecompa- thereto ; nor unless the petition for such railroad, 
en e g d in b eer report ° f other than a horse railroad, is accompanied and 
supported by the report of a skillful engineer, 
founded on actual examination of the route, and 
by other proper evidence, showing the character of 
the soil, the manner in which it is proposed to 
construct such railroad, the general profile of the 
surface of the country through which it is propos- 
ed to be made, the feasibility of the route, and an 
estimate of the probable expense of constructing 
the same. 
Railroads to be Sect. 13. Every act of incorporation of a rail- 

coufinedtothe *- J r . . 

limits notified. roa( j company shall confine the road within the 
limits indicated by the notice required in the pre- 
ceding section, shall specify the several towns, and, 
in case of a horse railroad, the street or streets, 
highway or highways, through which the same 
may pass, and shall otherwise designate the route 
on which the respective roads may be authorized 
to be made, with as much certainty as the nature 
of the case will admit. 
1844 - . Sect. 14. No petition for the incorporation of 

Notice ot peti- ' . . . * ,, , 

tiomfor mcorpo- a canal company, or tor an alteration in the cnar- 
comp"m f ^and ter of any such company, or of any railroad com- 
lanal'fnd 1 ™!^ pany, shall be heard by the- general assembly, 
road companies un i ess public notice thereof shall have been given. 

to be published. r , , y 

by advertisement, setting forth the route, as near 
as may be, of such proposed canal, or the proposed 
alteration of such charter, in some newspaper pub- 
lished in the county where such railroad, or canal, 
or some part thereof is located, or where such 
canal or some part thereof is proposed to be locat- 
ed, or if there be no newspaper published in such 
county, then in a newspaper published in an ad- 
joining county, at least three weeks before the 
first day of the session in which such hearing is to 
be had. 

AN ACT FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION OP 
TAXES. - 

Kaiiroad and Sect. 45. The secretaries, or treasurers, of the 

X-t7o a several railroad companies, and horse railroad 
o^oU^Tthe" 1 companies, which have been, or may hereafter be, 
comptroller, of incorporated in this state, shall, within the first 
BtoU% U ud°ru t nd- r ten days of October in each year make out, under 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 315 

oatli and deliver to the comptroller of public ac- debT&c° atillg 
counts, full and true lists or statements of the 
number of shares of stock in their respective com- 
panies, the amount of their funded and floating • 
debt, the amount of cash on hand, the true 
market value of each share of stock, and of their 
funded and floating indebtedness on the first day 
of the month in which such lists or statements 
are herein required to be made, the whole length 
of their respective roads, and the length of those 
portions thereof, if any there are, lying without 
this state. 

Sect. 4(3. Each of such railroad companies Amount of tax to 
shall, on or before the twentieth day of October, in road^Aorse 
each year, pay, or cause to be paid, to the treas- ^ oad compa " 
urer of this state, for the use of this state, a sum 
equal to one per cent, of the market value of the 
stock, and of the funded'and floating debt of such 
company, whether the stock and debt of such rail- 
road company, or horse railroad company, is 
owned by persons residing in this state or else- 
where, first deducting from such valuation, the 
amount of cash actually on hand ; which valua- 
tion so made, and approved or amended by the 
board of equalization, shall be regarded as fixing 
the basis or measure of value of such railroad and 
horse railroad, their rights, franchises, and pro- 
perty within the state, for the purposes of tax- 
ation ; and this sum or tax, shall take the place, 
and be in lieu, of all other taxes on railroads and 
horse railroad property, and franchises, within tins 
state ; but when a railroad lies partly within this when ™iroad 

. . 1 , . . . lies partly with- 

state, and partly within some adjoining state, or out the state, tax 
states, there shall be paid only such proportion of proportionally. 
the percentage herein required to be paid by said 
companies, respectively, on the value of such rail- 
road property, estimated as aforesaid, as the length 
of that portion of the road, which lies within this 
state, bears to the whole length of the road ; and f^ „ f 9 'JJ p^ 
when any tax, hereby imposed upon the property ing.an'y road a 

•> <* ' r r r J trustee. &c, to 

and franchises ot any railroad company, or horse te liable for the 
railroad company, becomes due, and such coin- tax ' 
pany shall not then be in the possession, and have 
the management and control of its road, or the 
road bearing its name, each and every person, 
railroad company, or corporation, then owning, 



316 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



possessing, operating, or having the management 
and control of such railroad, or horse railroad, 
either as trustee, assignee, agent, or lessee, shall 
be liable, and is hereby required to pay such tax. 
or cause it to be paid, to the treasurer of this 
state, for the use of the state, within the time 
prescribed by this act, for the payment of the 
same. 



Tax on railroad 
property and in- 
debtedness. 



Repeal. 



Tax on railroad 
property and in- 
debtedness. 



In addition, July 21th, 1867. 

Sect. 1. That the tax imposed in section 
forty-six, Chapter I, title LXIV, of an act entitled 
" An Act for the Assessment and Collection of 
Taxes," shall take the place and be in lieu of all 
other taxes on railroad and horse railroad proper- 
ty, franchises, funded and floating debts within 
this state. 

Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsis- 
tent herewith are hereby repealed. 

In addition, July 24th, 1868. 

That Chapter XL of the Public Acts passed 
May Session, A. D. 1867, shall not apply to any 
railroad or horse railroad property, not used for 
railroad purposes ; provided, that all real estate 
owned by railroad or horse railroad companies, 
not used for railroad purposes, located in this 
state, may be deducted from the market value 
of the stock of such companies in their return 
to the comptroller of this state. 

Persons or corpo- Sect. 47. Whenever any person, company, or 
SuroadsTst" 6001 '! 30 , 1 '^ 1011 ' owning, possessing, operating orhav- 
sees, may deduct nig the management and control of any railroad 

Cue timouiit of i *i i 1 1 i * 

tax paid, from or Horse railroad, as the lessee thereof, under or 

paymentsdueles- by viduc of &ny p^fr^ QV fe^ existing OU the 

tenth day of July, 1862, shall have paid, to the 
treasurer of the state, the tax required to be paid 
by such lessee, by the provisions of the next pre- 
ceding section of this act, such payment shall be 
deemed and considered to be made on account of 
the lessor of said railroad, or horse railroad, and 
the amount thereof may be deducted and with- 
held from any payments due, or to become due, 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 317 

to such lessor on account of such contract or 
lease. 

Sect. 55. The board of equalization shall ex- ^°,"n °haT iali " 
amine, and amend, or correct, all lists and state- amend and cor- 
ments returned to the comptroller of public ac- statement^ 
counts, as required by the eleven preceding sec- 
tions of this act, in such manner as they may 
deem just and equitable ; and in case any person 
shall fail to make such return, within the time, 
and in the manner prescribed, or shall, in the 
opinion of the board of equalization, make erron- 
eous returns, said board shall, within ten days 
after the time limited for making such returns, 
make out upon the best information winch they 
can obtain, the statement or list required to be 
made, and returned by the person so failing or 
making such erroneous return ; and a true copy 
of each list and statement, as amended, corrected, 
approved or made out by said board of equaliza- 
tion, shall be by them returned to each respective 
cashier, treasurer, secretary, superintendent, man- 
ager, agent, auctioneer, or clerk, by mail or 
otherwise : and the decision by said board of 
equalization shall be final and conclusive as to the 
value and amount of any of said deposits, stocks, 
property, receipts and collections, sales, and num- 
ber of messages, upon which the respective taxes 
are to be paid. 

Sect. 5Q. If any person shall fail to make out^^™™^^ 
and return to the comptroller of public accounts, returns and pay 
within the time and in the manner prescribed in tex ' 
the twelve preceding sections of this act, any list 
or statement therein required to be made and so 
returned, such person shall, for eacli failure, for- 
feit to the treasurer of this state, for the use of this 
state, the sum of five hundred dollars, to be recov- 
ered in the name of the treasurer by action on this 
statute ; and if any person, association, company, 
or corporation, required by such sections to make 
any payment to the treasurer of this state, shall 
fail to make, within the time therein limited, the 
payment so required, such person, association, 
company, or corporation, shall, for each failure, 
forfeit to the treasurer of this state a sum equal 
to twice the amount of the tax therein imposed 
upon such person, company, association, or cor- 



118 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

poration,to be recovered, in the name of the treas- 
urer, by action on this statute. 

AN ACT FOR THE SETTLEMENT OP ESTATES, TES- 
TATE, INTESTATE, AND INSOLVENT. 

1858. Sect. 115. The Trustee of any railroad corpo- 

hSSrf ration, whose estate is in settlement as an insol- 
tion°ler° ra vent estate, may, if the assets of such estate shall 
not otherwise be sufficient to pay the claims 
allowed by the commissioners, and the expenses 
of settling the estate, release to the proprietors of 
the land over which such corporation may have 
a right of way, or an encumbrance for other pur- 
poses connected with such railroad, upon such 
terms as shall be approved by the court of pro- 
bate, but nothing contained in this section shall in 
any way effect any right, or lien, existing prior to 
the appointment of such trustee. 

AN ACT CONCERNING LANDS. 

1846 ; Sect. 29. If the owner or occupant of any land 

witwn limits of adjoining any railroad or canal in this state, has, 
SrtSta^d since the tenth day of June, one thousand eight 
B^on Terse pos " hundred and thirty-one, taken, or shall take into, 
his enclosure any part of the land belonging to 
said railroad or canal, as located and established, 
or since that time has erected, or shall erect, 
any building upon any land belonging to any 
such railroad or canal as aforesaid, no continu- 
ance of such enclosure or building, or length of 
possession of the land belonging to such railroad 
or canal, so enclosed or built upon, shall create 
in such owner, or occupant, or in any person 
claiming under him, any right to the land be- 
longing to such railroad or canal, so enclosed or 
built upon. 

AN ACT FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND COLLECTION OF 
TAXES. 



In addition, June 10th, 1869. 

Bond3 of towns That all bonds issued or which may be issued^ 
cer C tlt e9 rSiro2 f by any town or city in aid of the construction of 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 319 

the railroads of " The Connecticut Western Rail- "J^* from *"- 
road Company," the " New Haven, Middletown, 
and Willimantic Railroad Company," the " She- 
paug Valley Railroad Company," and " The Con- 
necticut Valley Railroad Company," and either 
of them in pursuance of legal votes of such town 
or city, as authorized or ratified by the legislature 
of this state, and all bonds issued, or which may 
be issued by any town or city to provide or raise 
money to pay for stock subscribed by such town 
or city in any of the said railroad corporations in 
this state, in pursuance of legal votes of such town 
or city authorized or ratified as aforesaid, shall be 
exempt from taxation in the hands of the holders 
of such bonds ; provided, that whenever the avails 
of such bonds or stock shall have been expended Pr0T1S0 - 
in the construction of the railroads of said corpo- 
rations respectively, such railroad corporations 
shall pay a tax of one per cent, to the treasurer 
of this state upon the amount of snch bonds 
issued by any town or city in aid of the construc- 
tion of such railroad as aforesaid, whether such 
bonds are owned by persons or corporations in this 
state or elsewhere, and upon the amount of stock 
subscribed by any town or city in any of the said 
railroad corporations as aforesaid. 

AN ACT CONCERNING COMMUNITIES AND CORPORA- 
TIONS. 

In Addition, July 8th, 1869. 

Sect. 1. Every railroad company shall con- ^"^J,™,™ 1 ,- 1 ,; 
struct and maintain good and sufficient railings or s, ! mcie " t, ? n oes 

c P . - „. nil where their rotid 

fences on one or both sides of its road, when the runs within the 
same runs within the limits of any public highway joins a° public 
or turnpike road,' or adjoining thereto, whenever highway 
such railings or fences are necessary for the safety 
of persons or property passing over such highway 
or turnpike ; and if any person shall suffer any 
damage in his person or property by reason of the 
neglect of any railroad company in the premises, 
such railroad company shall pay to him just dam- 
ages. 

Sect. 2. If the'life^of any person traveling or^f//^ 
being upon any public highway or turnpike, in the 



320 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



tein le feDc e main " eserc i se of reasonable care, shall be lost by reason 
of the neglect of any railroad company to con- 
struct and keep in good order all necessary rail- 
ings or fences, as required by the foregoing sec- 
lion such railroad company shall be liable to pay 
damages, not exceeding five thousand dollars, to 
the use of the executor or administrator of the 
deceased person, to be recovered by such executor 
or administrator in an action in the case upon 
this statute, for the benefit of the husband or 
widow and heirs of the deceased person, one moie- 
ty thereof to go to the husband or widow, and 
the other to the children of the deceased ; but 
if there shall be no children, the whole sball go 
to the husband or widow, and if there is no bus- 
band or widow, to the heirs, according to the law 
regulating the distribution of intestate personal 
estate. 

Sect. 3. All acts or parts of acts inconsist- 
ent herewith are hereby repealed. 



Distribution of 
sum recovered. 



Repeal. 



In Addition, July Sthf 1869. 



Railroad compa- 
nies may make 
contracts with 
one another, leas- 
es of franchises, 
&c. 



Leases and con- 
tracts heretofore 
made validated. 

Consolidation of 
companies not 
authorized. 



Power of general 
assembly to regu- 
late charges of 
freight or pas- 
sage, running of 
trains, &c. 



Sect. 1. Any railroad company in this state 
may make any contract not forbidden by law with 
any other railroad company, with wliosc railroad 
its own railroad may connect or intersect, in rela- 
tion to the business or property of either of said 
companies ; may take a lease of the property and 
franchises of, or lease its property and franchises 
to any such railroad company, or may operate its 
railroad in connection with any such company, 
and all such leases and contracts heretofore made 
are hereby ratified and confirmed ; provided, that 
nothing in this act shall be so construed as to 
authorize the merger or consolidation of the stock 
of any railroad companies. 

Sect. 2. Nothing in this act shall be constru- 
ed to limit or take away any rights or powers of 
the general assembly, to pass any law regulat- 
ing the charges for carrying freight or passen- 
gers on any such railroad or connecting rail- 
roads, or regulating the number or the running 
trains, or in reference to the franchise or business 
of such railroads. 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 321 

In Addition, July 9th, 1869. 



Every person who shall commit any nuisance in Penalty for com 

., li-i - l • i ii i mittmgnuis- 

or upon any railroad bridge m this state, shall be ances on railroad 
punished by a fine not exceeding seven dollars, or g '° 
by imprisonment in a common jail not exceeding 
thirty days, or by such fine and imprisonment 
both. 

AN ACT CONCERNING ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

In Addition, July \0th, 1869. 

Sect. 1. That no town shall be liable to any JF° r ^? u ^ d ^ e 
suit or action for an injury received on any high- by reason of acts 

, i p , , of railroad cor- 

way in such town by reason of any structure portions, 
j daced in said highway by any railroad corpo- 
ration by authority of law, but such damage may 
be recovered in a suit against said railroad com- 
pany. 

Sect. 2. This act shall not affect any suit now p^g^ts. 
pending. 

AN ACT CONCERNING COMMUNITIES AND CORPORA- 
TIONS. 

In Addition, July 9th, 1869. 

That all highway bridges hereafter constructed construction of 
over any railroad track in this state shall be so roa/tnuskTreg- 
constructed that the bottom timbers of the bridge ulated ' 
shall be not less than eighteen feet above the top 
of the rail in the railroad track ; and that all 
covered bridges constructed on the line of any rail- 
road shall be not less than eighteen feet in height 
from the top surface of the rail laid in the track 
on the bridge to the under side of the cross beams 
over 1 lead. 

That section five hundred thirty-eight, of the Rc & ulatin s the 

, J c /. stoppage of raii- 

act concerning communities and corporations, of road trains before 

the general statutes, be and is hereby amended by SiroadcroTs- 01 
striking out the word " passenger;" also by strik- ing8 ' 
ing out the words " one thousand feet," and in- 
serting in lieu thereof the words " eight hundred 
feet." 

41 



322 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



Who may vote on 
shares ol railroad 
stock subscribed 
for by towns. 



Wilful injury to 
personal b:ig 
gage, how pun- 
ished. 



Regulating ap- 
peals from action 
of railroad com- 
missioners, au- 
thorizing the 
crossing oi uon- 
navigable 
streams. 



In Addition, July 9th, 1869. 

That the agent, appointed by any town in this 
state, to subscribe for stock in any railroad, shall 
have power to vote on the shares ol stock sub- 
scribed for by him in all meetings of the stock- 
holders of such railroad, unless such town shall 
otherwise direct. 

That any baggage-master, express agent, stage- 
driver, hackmau or oilier person, whose duty it is 
to handle, remove or take care of the baggage ol 
passengers, who shall wilfully or wantonly injure 
or destroy any trunk, valise, box, package, or par- 
cel, while loading, transporting, unloading, deliver- 
ing, or storing the same, shall be punished by a 
fine not exceeding fifty dollars, one-half to go to 
the complainant. 

Sect 1. Whenever any railroad company shall 

be permitted, or authorized by the railroad com- 
missioners, to cross or intersect any stream ol 
water or water course, not navigable, or pond ol 
water, and, in the opinion of any person inter- 
ested in such stream of water, water course or 
pond, said intersection or crossing will impair the 
usefulness of such stream, water course or pond, 
as a water power, or endanger the safety of the 
public, or that said stream will not be restored to 
its former state of safety, by reason of embank- 
ments, filling or bridge piers, permitted or allowed 
by said commissioners, an appeal shall be a owed 
to such interested person aggrieved by such lay- 
out or permission, to any judge ol the superior 
court, within twenty days after the owners ol 
the land adjoining said stream, at the point ol said 
intersection, or crossing, shall have had actual no- 
tice of the manner in which the said commis- 
sioners have permitted said stream to be crossed. 
Which appeal shall be by a suitable petition, in 
writing, for a hearing in regard to said claims ol 
said petitioner, and the propriety ol said manner ol 
crossing said stream, with a citation attached 
thereto, and returnable in not less than eight nor 
more than twelve days alter this date, and served, 
at least live days before the return day, upon such 
railroad company. And said judge shall have, b ir 
the purpose of disposing of said appeal, all the 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 323 

powers of the superior court, and may proceed, 
by himself or by committee, to a hearing in regard 
to said claim or claims, and the propriety of said 
manner of crossing said stream, watercourse, or 
pond, and may render a decree, either establish- 
ing more and sufficient water way at the place of 
crossing or intersection of such stream, water 
course, or pond, or providing such method of 
crossing that the usefulness and safety of said 
stream may be preserved, and that the safety of 
the public may not be endangered, or confirming 
said method of lay-out. And if said alteration is 
so decreed, award costs against said railroad com- Award of costs 
pany ; and if said lay-out or permitted mode of 
crossing or intersection is confirmed, award costs 
against the petitioners, and issue execution in 
favor of either party for costs, to be taxed as upon 
civil process in the superior court. Said appeal 
shall be a supersedeas, so far as said crossing or A PP eal t0 be a 
intersection is concerned, until judgment shall ) )e superse ea! - 
rendered thereon by such judge of the superior 
court. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect from and ^, e t a t0 take 
after its passage. 

AN ACT CONCERNING COMMUNITIES AND CORPORA- 
TIONS. 

Li Addition, July 21s£, 1870. 



Sect. 1. No highway or public street of any Lay-out of high- 
kind shall hereafter be laid out or constructed Sf 9 acn,ss ™'~ 
across any railroad in this state upon a level 
therewith, except under authority and permis- 
sion in writing from the general railroad com- 
missioners. 

Sect. 2. The town, city, borough, or other Noticeof P r °- 

__ . • i posed lay-out to 

party proposing to so lay out or construct any be given to rail- 
highway or other public street, shall, before ^ commte,ion - 
doing the same, notify said commissioners in 
writing of such proposed action, and thereupon it 
shall be the duty of said commissioners to give to 
said town, city, borough, or party, and to the com- 
pany whose railroad it is so proposed to cross as 
aforesaid reasonable notice in writing, of the time 
and place when and where they may be heard in 



324 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

reference to said proposed crossing upon a level : 
and in case they allow said crossing, then said lay- 
out and construction may be proceeded with in the 
same manner in all respects as if this act had not 
been passed. 
Expense of such Sect. 3. If said commissioners shall disallow 
borne Dgh ° w said proposed lay-out or construction upon a level 
with said railroad, then they shall further deter- 
mine whether ^aid highway or other public street 
shall cross over or under said railroad ; and one- 
half of the expense of said crossing over or under, 
as the case may be, shall be borne by said railroad 
company, and such railroad company, upon the 
completion of said highway or street, including 
such crossing, shall pay over the same to the party 
entitled thereto. 

wSTbridpSt Sect - 4 - If said ni g nwa y or street sua11 cross 
crossing. 0V er said railroad, the bridge or other structure 

necessary therefor, shall be maintained and kept 

in repair by the party chargeable by law with the 

maintenance of said highway or street ; but if said 

highway or street shall cross under said railroad, 

the railroad bridge necessary therefor shall be 

maintained and kept in repair by said railroad 

company. 

Fees. Sect. 5. The fees of said commissioners under 

this act shall be the same as now provided by law 

for other service by them, and shall be paid by the 

parties in interest, in equal proportions. 

AN ACT RELATING TO THE CROSSING OP THE NAU- 
GATUC RAILROAD AND THE NAUGATUC RIVER BY 
THE NEW HAVEN AND DERBY RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Lay-out of n. h. Skct. 1. The location and lay-out of the rail- 

and Derby It. K. „ r i t\ i t-» •! 1 n 

approved. road of the New Haven and Derby Railroad Com- 

pany across the Naugatuc Railroad and the Nau- 
gatuc River, and the flats and meadows adjacent 
thereto, as the said location and lay-out have been 
-recently approved in writing by the railroad com- 
missioners, are hereby approved and confirmed ; 
and the New Haven and Derby Railroad Company 
are hereby authorized to construct their railroad 
and their proposed bridge across said river, and 
Hats and meadows, upon the route and in the 
manner prescribed and provided in and by the 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 325 

said written approval so made by the railroad com- 
missioners. 

Sect. 2. The New Haven and Derby Railroad SHtTtah? 
Company shall, at all times, at their own exclusive section of roads, 
expense, provide, at the point of the intersection 
of their railroad with the Naugatuc Railroad, such 
means of preventing collisions and accidents, by 
flag-men or otherwise, as may be required by the 
railroad commissioners, or by law, for that pur- 
pose. 

Sect. 3. This act shall take effect from its 
passage. 

Approved, July 5th, 1870. 

AN ACT FOR THE PROTECTION OP THE BRIDGE OP 
THE SHORE LINE RAILWAY OVER CONNECTICUT 
RIVER. 

Whereas the bridge of the Shore Line Railway 
over Connecticut River is nearly completed ; 
and whereas, it is found that the piers of said 
bridge, if left without suitable support, will be 
insecure and liable to be undermined and swept 
away ; and whereas, the right of the Shore Line 
Railway to make said piers secure, by ballasting 
or otherwise, is called in question ; and whereas, 
for the safety of the public it is necessary that 
said piers and bridge should be made, and at all 
times kept, absolutely safe and secure ; there- 
fore : — 

Sect. 1. The Shore Line Railway is hereiy ^°™ u L t ^ e ri ^- 
authorized to support and strengthen the pios of t0 . secure their 
its bridge over Connecticut River, by depositing nectfc e ut T by de™ 
within, between and around the cylinders of said^rou^th^piers. 
piers, and around said piers, from time to time, 
stone and ballast in such manner and in such 
quantities as may be necessary or useful in order 
to make said cylinders, piers, and bridge, firm, safe, 
and secure ; and said corporation is hereby author- 
ized to do, from time to time, such work upon 
said bridge, piers, and cylinders as may be neces- 
sary or proper in order to maintain and keep said 
bridge, piers and cylinders in a condition of safety 
and security : Provided, however, that said cor- 
poration shall not deposit stone or ballast around 



326 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

said piers at a height exceeding twelve feet from 
the natural bed of the river at a point where said 
stone or ballast comes in contact with said piers 
or cylinders, and, when so deposited, such stone 
or ballast shall be laid so as to form a slope from 
the highest point of such contact to the bed of the 
river, and not to extend laterally from said piers 
or cylinders in any direction to exceed eighteen 
feet : — And provided further, that within the 
draws of such bridge no stone or ballast shall be 
deposited or kept so as to reduce the depth of 
water at any point between the piers of said draws 
to less than twelve feet at any time. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect from its 
passage. 

Approved, July 15th, 1870. 

AN ACT FOR THE PROTECTION OF ELECTRIC SIGNALS 
ON RAILROADS. 

Penalty for wilful Sect. 1. Everv person who shall willfullv and 

injury to electric . i • • * i , < i , • 

signals on rail- maliciously injure, molest, or destroy any electric 
signal in use on any railroad in this state, or any 
material or property appertaining thereto, or who 
shall cut, disconnect, remove, or otherwise inter- 
rupt the use of any wire, lever, pin, or battery, 
used to operate such signal or its connection there- 
with, shall he punished by a fine not exceeding one 
thousand dollars, and by imprisonment in the Con- 
necticut state prison for a term not exceeding ten 
years. 

Stoefitet!"* Sect - 2 - Tllis act sha11 take cffect from i(s 
parage. 

Approved, June loth, 1871. 

AN ACi' IN ADDITION TO AN ACT CONCERNING COM- 
MUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

rSfcomStaSon- That tlu; railroad commissioners be and they 
en to he k^t at hereby arc authorized to hire an office at an annual 

Hartford. . , , , . . , , , , , , 

rent not to exceed the sum of five hundred dollars, 
in the city of Hartford, where their records shall 
be kept for examination and preservation ; the rent 
and incidental expense.-; of said office shall be col- 
lected by said commissioners in the same manner 
as their general expenses \are now by taw col- 
lected. 

Approved, July 11th, 1871. ' 

i 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 327 



AN ACT RELATING TO THE CITY OF NEW HAVEN. 

Sect. 1. The court of common council in the This section re- 
city of New Ha von shall have the right to fix and ffljj*^***"' 
determine the height of all bridges crossing rail- 
roads in said city. 

Sect. 2. The said court of common council voting districts 
shall have the same power to establish voting dis- seventh districts. 
tricts in the first and seventh voting districts of 
the towii of New Haven, that it now has in the 
second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth voting dis- 
tricts in said town. 

Sect. 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent Repeal, 
herewith, are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect from its 
passage. 

Approved, July 18th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ALTERATION OF AN ACT ENTITLED AN 
ACT RELATING TO THE CITY OF NEW HAVEN. 

That the first section of chapter ninety-two of Re .P eal ? fc ^" 

i J xcii, act3 of loil. 

the public acts of 1871, approved July 18th, 1871, 
be and the same is hereby repealed. 
Approved, July 27th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT ENTITLED AN ACT 
CONCERNING COMMUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

Sect. 1. That the general railroad commis- Rflilr0ildcommi5 

i n .i i i i • i soners may reg- 

sioners he, and they arc hereby authorized to grant mate the num- 
permission to any railroad company of this state on r P ° a f ssenger" en 
to reduce the number of hrakemen now required trains - 
by law to be placed upon passenger trains, when- 
ever such company may have adopted a system of 
brakes to be operated by the engineer, which in 
the opinion of said commissioners may render the 
number of brakemen now required by law unneces- 
sary; but said commissioners may revoke the per- 
mission granted by authority of this act, whenever 
they consider the public safety requires, and on 
said revocation such company shall place upon its 
trains the number of brakemen now required by 
law. 



328 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

Approved, July 5th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT CONCERNING COM- 
MUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

hlghX C bK Sect * 1 ' Tnat al1 lu &hway bridges hereafter 

oyer rahroad' constructed over anv railroad track in this state, 

trtteks 

shall bo so constructed that the bottom timbers of 
the bridge shall be not less than eighteen feet 
above the top of the rail in the railroad track ; ex- 
cept in such cases when in the opinion of the rail- 
road commissioners the interests of the public re- 
quire a less height, and in such cases the said com- 
missioners shall prescribe and direct in writing the 
height at which said bottom timbers shall be above 
the top of the rail in said railroad track. 
Repeal- Sect. 2. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent 

herewith, are hereby repealed. 
Approved, July 5th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT RELATING TO LIENS. 

Liens on rail- Sect. 1. Every railroad in the construction, 

roads for maten- . . J 

ais furnished or grading, or bunding of which, or any of its ap- 

services rendered i 1 1 i 1 • r 

in construction, purtenances, any person shall have a claim lor 
materials furnished, or services rendered, by virtue 
of any contract made with or approved bythecor- 
poration owning or managing said railroad, shall, 
with its real estate, right of way, material, equip- 
ment, rolling stock, and franchise, be subject to 
the payment of such claim ; and the said claim 
shall be a lien on the said railroad and its said 
property and appurtenances, and the manner of 
filing, perfecting and foreclosing said lien, shall 
be in accordance with the provisions of title thirty- 
eight, of the revised statutes of 1866, and all the 
provisions of said act are hereby extended and 
made applicable to railroads and persons furnish- 
ing services and materials as above specified : pro- 
vided, however, that the certificate required by the 
act to which this is an addition, shall in cases 
arising under this act, he filed in the office of the 
secretary of state, who shall record the same in a 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 329 

book kept for that purpose, receiving the usual 
fees therefor ; and provided further, that no lien 
claimed under this act shall take precedence of 
any mortgage now existing of the whole or any 
part of the railroad, railroad property or franchise, 
upon which said lien may attach, unless such 
mortgage he executed after the filing of the cer- 
tificate of lien in the office of the secretary of state 
for record. 
Approved, July 27th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT CONCERNING COM- 
MUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

Sect. I. Every railroad company shall con- ¥ ili : o8d c ?™p. a - 

. . ~i . J ... mes to mam tarn 

struct and maintain good and sufficient railings or fewe between 

c u i_i *J c 'j. l l j-1 their road and 

fences on one or both sides ol its road when tlie the highway. 
land between its line of right of way and any pub- 
lic highway or turnpike road is uninclosed and un- 
fenced, whenever such railings or fences are neces- 
sary to prevent animals from passing from such 
public highway or turnpike road on to such rail 
road track ; and if any person shall suffer any 
damage in his person or property by reason of the 
neglect of any railroad company in the premises, 
such railroad shall pay to him who shall so suffer, 
just damages. 

Skct. 2. If it is the duty of any person to con- incase it is the 
struct or maintain any such fence, the railroad so^omam'tanT 
company constructing or maintaining the same such fence- 
may proceed and collect the expense thereof from 
such person in the manner provided in sections 
four hundred and thirty-two and four hundred and 
ninety- three of the act to which this is an ad- 
dition. 

Approved, July 19th, 1871. 

AN ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE FORMATION OP RAILROAD 
COMPANIES, AND TO REGULATE THE SAME. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Rep- 
ri'.<f)itatives, in General Assembly convened : 

Sect. 1. Any number of persons not less than Formation of 
twenty-five may form a company for the purpose ™ 1 a roa(1( ' om i' :i 
of constructing, maintaining and operating a rail- 
42 



380 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

road for public use in the conveyance of persons 
and property, subject to the provisions of this act. 
and of the general statutes of the state respecting 
railroads. 
atiou. 88 Sect. 2. The persons forming such railroad 

company, shall make and sign articles of associa- 
tion, in which shall be stated ; first the name of 
the company ; second, the place where their princi- 
pal office or place of business is located, which 
shall be and continue in this state ; third, the places 
from and to which, and the names of all the towns 
through or into which it is proposed to construct, 
maintain, and operate said road : fourth, the length 
of said rail road, as nearly as may be, and the amount 
of capital stock of the company, which shall not be 
less than ten thousand dollars for every mile of 
road proposed to be constructed : fifth, the names 
and residence of not less than nine directors of said 
company, who shall be chosen by the persons sub- 
scribing said articles of association, and a majority 
of whom shall always be residents of this state, and 
shall manage its affairs for one year, and until 
others are chosen in their stead -.provided, however, 
that the amount of the funded and floating debt 
of any railroad corporation established under this 
act shall at no time exceed the amount of cash 
actually paid in upon the capital stock of such com- 
pany, 
capital stock. Sect. 3. The capital stock of said company 
shall be divided into shares of one hundred dol- 
lars each, and each subscriber to Such articles of 
association, shall subscribe thereto his name, resi- 
dence, and the number of shares he agrees to 
take in said company, and on compliance with 
the provisions of the next section, such articles of 
association may be filed in the office of the secretary 
of state, who shall endorse thereon the day they 
are tiled, and record the same in a book to be pro- 
vided by him for that purpose, and thereupon the 
persons who have subscribed such articles of 
association, and all persons who shall become stock- 
holders of such company, shall be a corporation 
by the name specified in such articles of associa- 
tion. 
toa^com'pt^the Sect. 4. Such articles of association shall not 
ation! s " f asso °' bc n ^ e( l ail( -l recorded unless they are accompanied 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 331 

by the report, under oath, of a skillful engineer, 
founded on an actual examination of the route, 
showing the character and structure of the pro- 
posed road-bed, with its indications of rock or 
earth cuttings ; the manner in which it is proposed 
to construct said railroad ; the general profile of 
the surface of the country through which it is pro- 
posed to he made ; the feasibility of the route, and 
an estimate of the probable expense of construct- 
ing the same : a copy of which report shall be kept 
on file in the office of the secretary of state ; nor 
shall such articles of association be filed and re- 
corded until at least five thousand dollars of stock 
for every mile of railroad proposed to be made is 
subscribed thereto, and ten per cent, of such sub- 
scription paid in cash to the directors named in 
said articles of association, nor unless there is an- 
nexed thereto an affidavit made by at least three 
of the directors named in said articles, that the 
amount of stock required by this section has been 
in good faith subscribed, and ten -per cent, in cash 
paid thereon as aforesaid, and that it is intended 
in good faith to construct the road named in such 
articles of association. And a copy of any articles 
of association filed and recorded as aforesaid, or of 
the record thereof, certified by the secretary of 
state, shall be prima facie evidence of the due 
formation, existence, and capacity of said corpora- 
tion. 

Sect. 5. When such articles of association are subscriptions to 

i . a> i-i p the capital stock . 

recorded in the office ol the secretary of state, the 
directors may, in case the whole of the capital 
stock is not subscribed, open books of subscription 
"to the same, in such places and on such notice as 
they may deem expedient, and may continue to 
receive subscriptions until the whole of the capital 
stock is subscribed ; and at the time of subscribing 
every subscriber shall pay ten per cent, on the 
amount subscribed by him in lawful money, and 
no subscription shall be received or taken without 
such payment often per cent, in cash on subscrib- 
ing ; j<rovided, such company shall not commence 
the construction of its road until at least ten thou- 
sand dollars per mile is subscribed to the capital 
stock thereof by responsible persons, and ten per 
cent, in cash is paid in thereon. 



382 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

Powersofthe SECT. 6. Sucll COmpailV OiaV purchase, re- 

company. . , , . . . c . 1 ••' J / . , 

ceive, and hold in tee simple, or otherwise, such 
real estate as may be necessary or convenient for 
accomplishing the objects of this act, may by 
their agents, surveyors, and engineers, enter 
upon such route, place, or places, as may be 
designated by their board of directors, for the 
purpose of making surveys, and determining the 
line, course or way whereon to construct said rail- 
road, and may construct, complete, equip, and 
maintain and enjoy a railway, with one or more 
tracks, over the route specified in their articles of 
association, and to take, transport and carry per- 
sons and property thereon, by the power and 
force of steam, of animals, or of any mechanical 
or other power, or any combination of them ; and 
shall be vested with all the powers and privileges 
enjoyed by all other railroad companies in this 
state, subject to all the statutes which are now or 
may hereafter be enacted for the government of 
railroad companies, and all the immunities, rights, 
privileges and powers given in this act shall be 
enjoyed by the railroad companies at present ex- 
isting in this state ; provided, the same do not 
conflict with the special provisions of any charter, 
powers of the di- Sbct. 7. Tlie directors of any such railroad 
rectors. company for the time being, shall have power to 

till any vacancies which may occur in their num- 
ber, may clioose a president, vice president, and 
such other officers as they may deem expedient, 
may make and prescribe such by-laws, rules, and 
regulations as they shall deem needful and proper, 
not contrary to the laws of this state or .of the 
United States, in regard to the disposition and 
management of the stock, property, estate and ef- 
fects of said company ; the transfer of its shares, 
the duties anil conduct of its officers and servants, 
the warning and holding of meetings of directors 
and stockholders, and all matters whatsoever, 
which may appertain to the regulation of the af- 
fairs of such company. The number of directors 
may lie fixed by the stockholders at (any) annual 
meeting, 
intersections or Sect. 8. Such company may, if necessary in 

connections with „ , f ».. * ' . ' 

ether roads, tlie construction ot their railroad, intersect, cross. 
or connect with any other railroad ; provided, that 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 333 

if said company shall desire to make any such 
crossing, intersection, or connection, it shall first 
agree with the railroad company whose road it so 
desires to intersect, cross, or connect with, in ref- 
erence to the plan or manner thereof, if able to do 
so, but if unable so to agree, then the board of 
railroad commissioners shall have power to fix and 
determine the place or manner of such connection, 
intersection or crossing, after giving reasonable 
notice to such company, to attend and be heard, 
and their action in the premises shall be final ; 
and provided further, that no such railroad shall 
cross or intersect any other double track railroad 
on grade, except for the purpose of making a con- 
nection therewith ; and provided further, that 
nothing in this act contained shall authorize the 
bridging of navigable waters, without the consent 
of the general assembly. 

Sect. 9. Any such railroad company may make contracts with 
lawful contracts with any other railroad company, tersectiug S road°" 
with whose railway its track may connect or in- 
tersect, in relation to its business or property, and 
may take a lease of the property, or franchise of, 
or lease its property or franchises to any such rail- 
way company, on such terms as may be mutually 
agreed on by such companies ; and may construct 
branehes from the main line to any place or town 
in this state, subject to the provisions of this act ; Branches. 
provided, that this act shall not be construed to 
authorize the merger or consolidation of the stock 
of such companies. 

Sect. 10. Any railroad company may lay out T <*j n s |andfor 
and locate its road and take any lands for the poses, 
various purposes thereof, in the manner prescribed 
by the general statute laws of this state ; but no 
land shall lie taken without the consent of the 
owner thereof, except within twelve months after 
the approval of the location of the route by the 
board of railroad commissioners ; and when the 
lands of any feme covert, infant, cestui que trust, 
or person non compos mentis, shall be necessary 
for construction of any railroad, said lands may 
be taken, on giving notice to the husband of such 
feme cwert, the trustee of any such cestui que trust, 
the guardian, either natural or appointed, of such 
infant, and the conservator of such person non 



234 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

compos mentis, and they may respectively release 
all damages for lands taken as aforesaid as fully as 
they might do if the same were holden in their 
own right respectively. And in all cases of the 
laying out or constructing any railroad, the supe- 
rior court or any judge thereof, may prescribe 
and order what notice shall be given to the own- 
ers of such land ; provided, that nothing in this 
act contained, shall authorize any railroad com- 
pany to take or use the track, wharves, depot or 
depot grounds of any other company without their 
consent, except for the purpose of crossing, inter- 
section, or connection, as provided in section eighth 
of this act. 

J"utock° f c " pi " Sect - H- In cape tne capital stock of any rail- 
road company is found to be insufficient, such 
company may, with the concurrence of two-thirds 
in amount of the stock represented at a meeting 
of the stockholders called for that purpose, in- 
crease its capital stock to such amount as may be 
required for the purposes of said road, and in such 
manner and on sucb terms as may be prescribed by 
said stockholders' meeting ; and the board of 
directors of any railroad company may at any time 
with the assent of its stockholders first had and 
obtained at a meeting legally called for that pur- 
pose, increase its capital stock to an amount? suffi- 
cient to extinguish its funded and floating debt; 
provided, however, that the amount of such in- 
creased capital stock, at its 'par value, shall not 
exceed the amount of such debts, and that such 
increased stock shall only be issued to take up and 
cancel an equal amount of debts as aforesaid. 

corporate powers Skct. 12. If any company formed under the 

toce^°mS v provisions of this act shall not, within one year 
after its articles of association are filed and recorded 
in the office of the secretary of state, commence 
the construction of its road, and expend thereon 
ten per cent, of the amount of its subscribed capi- 
tal, or shall not finish or put in operation ils rail- 
road within five years from the time of recording 
its articles as aforesaid, its corporate existence and 
powers shall cease. 

Reservation or Sect. 13. The powers, rights and franchise of 

riirht to alter or' ,. ,. , . 1 • 

any corporation torined pursuant to tins act may 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 335 

be altered, amended, or annulled, at the pleasure annuI p° wcts of 
of the general assembly. companies. 

Sect. 14. Nothing- contained in this act shall contraction of 
be construed to authorize.the building or construe- tSZSES* 

tion ol any horse railroads in any of the streets of by thisact - 
any city or borough in this state. 
Approved, July 21st, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT ENTITLED AN ACT 
CONCERNING COMMUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

Whereas, for their common benefit and interest, 
and for the convenience and benefit of the pub- 
lic, the New York and New Haven railroad 
company and the Hartford and New Haven 
railroad company, did, on the 3d day of August, 
1870, enter into certain perpetual covenants and 
agreements, under authority of and in accord- 
ance with the statute laws of this state, which 
covenants have teen fully adopted and approved 
by the unanimous vote of the stockholders of 
said Hartford and New Haven railroad company, 
and by the vote, almost unanimous, of the stock- 
holders of said New York and New Haven rail- 
road company ; which covenants and agree- 
ments have merged the entire railways and 
properties of said corporations into a joint estate, 
have brought the management of both of said 
corporations into a joint estale. and have 
brought the management of both of said corpo- 
rations under a common board of managers, and 
have secured perpetually the income of both 
said roads to be a common fund for the expenses 
and liabilities and dividends of both companies, 
and as it would be for the convenience ana" best 
interest of said companies, and of the traveling 
and shipping public having dealings with them 
that said companies should have a single corpo- 
rate existence ; therefore : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentativea in General Assembly convened : 

Sect. 1. The Hartford and New Haven rail- ii«rtford and 



New Haven rail- 



336 LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 

road may con- roa( j coni p a ny may sell, transfer, merge, and 

solidate with the ' . J J . , Jit 

New York and co ii soli date its corporate rights, powers and estate, 
NewHa™ ^ to , into, and with the New York and New I -Liven 
railroad company, upon such consideration, terms, 
stipulations, and conditions as may be agreed upon 
between said corporations, and are authorized by 
the provisions of this act. 
Articles of a S ree- Sect. 2. The directors of said corporations 
"nlain "how may, in the names and under the seals of their re- 
executed, spective corporations, enter into joint articles of 
agreement for the sale, transfer, purchase, merger, 
and consolidation hereby authorized, prescribing 
the considerations, terms, and conditions thereof, 
the mode of effecting such transfer, merger, and 
consolidation, the name of such consolidated cor- 
poration, and the number of directors thereof, 
which shall not be more than twenty-one, nor less 
than nine, a majority of whom shall lie citizens re- 
siding in this state, and the persons who shall act 
as such directors until the next regular election of 
directors by said consolidated corporation, the 
number of "shares, and the amount of the capital 
stock of said consolidated corporation, which shall 
not exceed the present authorized capital of said 
companies, the manner of converting the capital 
stocks of said original corporations into the capi- 
tal stock of the consolidated corporation, and the 
compensation to be made for fractional parts of 
shares, and such other matters, things, and details 
as may be necessary or proper to effect the purposes 
and merger aforesaid. 
Agreement to be Sect 3 Said" agreement of the directors hcre- 
£>T«( inbefore authorized shall be submitted to the 
eachcorporatIon - stockholders of each of said corporations separate- 
ly, at a meeting specially called for that purpose, 
and if approved by a vote of at least two-thirds of 
the stock represented at each of the said meetings, 
and not otherwise, said agreement made by said 
directors shall become the agreement of said cor- 
porations respectively, and a certified copy thereof, 
together with a certificate of the adoption of said 
agreement by the stockholders of said respective 
corporations, under the hand of the secretary ot 
each of said corporations, shall be filed in the of- 
fice of the secretary of this state, and thereupon 
said Hartford and New Haven railroad company 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 337 

shall be and become merged and consolidated in 
and with said New York and New Haven railroad 
company ; and said consolidated corporation shall 
continue a body politic and corporate, under the corporate name, 
corporate name of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford railroad company, and shall possess, 
hold, and enjoy all the rights, powers, franchises, 
and privileges theretofore vested in either of said 
corporations ; and all the property, real and per- 
sonal, including all rights of way and rights of 
action, belonging to either of said corporations, 
shall be deemed and taken to be transferred to 
and vested in the corporation into which said 
merger is made, without further act or deed to be 
done, executed, or performed ; provided, that no- 
thing in this act shall be so construed as to au- 
thorize said last named corporation to merge, con- The corporation 
solidate, or make joint stock with any other rail- consolidate with 
road company, or make perpetual lease with any pany 0ther com " 
such railroad, without consent of the general as- 
sembly first had and obtained. 

Sect. 4. All rights of creditors and all liens consolidation 

° „.-.... not to affect 

upon the property or either ol said original corpo-rightsofcredi- 
rations, shall continue unimpaired, and all debts, contracts oAa-' 
contracts and liabilities of either of said original b,lltles 
corporations shall attach to, and become binding 
upon such consolidated company, and may be en- 
forced in the same manner, and to the same ex- 
tent, as if contracted or incurred by said latter 
corporation ; and said original corporations shall 
at all times be taken to be in existence in their 
original names and capacities for the enforcement 
of any and all claims in favor of or against either 
of said corporations. 

Sect. 5. If any stockholder of either of said Proceed f iu f l . i ° 

. , •* CEIS6 3, StOCKQOlil- 

original corporations shall, at said meeting of erof « ither ?° r - 
stockholders, or within sixty days thereafter, ob- tothTconsoiidt- 
ject to such proposed transfer and merger, and tl0U ' 
signify to such corporation his objections in writ- 
ing, such stockholder, or said consolidated corpo- 
ration may, if said contract of merger shall have 
been approved and taken effect as aforesaid, at 
any time thereafter, apply by petition in writing, 
to any judge of the superior court to appoint one 
or more disinterested persons to appraise the 
value of the shares or share of such stockholder, 
43 



338 LAWS RELATING- TO RAILROADS. 

and said judge — reasonable notice first being 
given to the adverse party, winch notice said 
judge is authorized to prescribe — shall appoint one 
or more disinterested persons to make such ap- 
praisal ; and said person or persons so appointed 
shall, under oath, appraise the value of said stock, 
and make return thereof in writing under his or 
their hands, to said judge, who shall lodge the 
same with the clerk of the superior court, in the 
county in which such application shall be made, 
and said clerk shall record the same ; and when 
so returned and recorded, such appraisement shall 
have the effect of a judgment, and execution may 
issue therefor in favor of such stockholder against 
said corporation ; and said appraisement shall be 
paid in full by said corporation to said stockholder 
if to be found within this state ; if not, then to 
the treasurer of this state, who is hereby author- 
ized to receive and hold the same on deposit for 
the use, 'and to the order of such stockholder ; 
and when said appraisement shall have been so 
paid or deposited as aforesaid, said stockholder 
shall cease to have any further interest therein, 
and shall, on demand made, surrender said stock 
and all certificates thereof to said corporation ; 
and the fees of said appraisers and of said clerk, 
shall be taxed by said judge and paid by said cor- 
poration. 

charters of the Sect. 6. Said consolidated corporation shall 
%&?£& be subject to the charter of the corporation into 

be iu force. which such merger is made, as such charter may 
be modified by such agreement of merger, and by 
the provisions of this act ; provided, however, that 
when a special duty, liability, or burden is im- 
posed, or any special privilege, franchise or im- 
munity conferred on the corporation so merged 
as aforesaid, by its charter, such duty, liability, 
or burden shall, until otherwise ordered, attach to, 
and be discharged by, and such franchise, immu- 
nity, or privilege be enjoyed by such consolidat- 
ed corporation, so far as the same were appli- 
cable to the road and franchise of said merged 
corporation. 

Accommodation Sect. 7. Said consolidated corporation shall 

£ST icang ticket passengers, check baggage, way bill freight, 
transfer cars, and give equal facilities for the con- 



LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 339 

venient transfer of passengers, baggage, and 
freight, to and from all connecting railroads, and 
shall make no unequal discrimination for or 
against either of said railroads in its joint pas- 
senger and freight rates, or in the division of said 

l*fttf*S 

Sect. 8. Said consolidated corporation shall £S*S£ ?h* be 
at all times be subject to the power, control, J£°p™j "f^m- 
and legislation of the general assembly of this My- 
state. 

Sect. 0. This act shall take effect upon its ^ c e t n t0 teke 
passage. 

Approved, July 26th, 1871. 

AN ACT IN ADDITION TO AN ACT CONCERNING COM- 
MUNITIES AND CORPORATIONS. 

If at any time the -New York and New Haven x- v., n. h & 
Railroad Company shall be consolidated with any afford the same 
other railroad company, such consolidated com-f h c ^*^ p ^" 
pany shall be subject to the provisions of s ecti(>ns^ e ^ ti be ii fore 
five hundred and nineteen and five hundred aud 
twenty-three of chapter seven, of title seven, of 
the revised statutes, in the same manner and to 
the same extent as the New York and New Haven 
Railroad Company would have beeu, if no such 
consolidation had been made. • 

Approved. July 28th, 1871. 



INDEX TO LAWS RELATING TO RAILROADS. 



ACCIDENTS, notice to be given to Commissioners in case of, 308 

duty of commissioners in case of, - - 308 

liability of company for, - 303 

penalty for the intoxication of servants, - - 307 

ACTIONS, for personal injuries take precedence when, - 308- 

limitation of for certain causes, ... 308 

ANIMALS, may not be led, driven, or ridden upon track, 290 

APRONS, companies must connect passenger cars with, - 304 

ASSESSMENTS, how made and collected, - - 257 

AUDITED, accounts of commissioners, how, - - - 259 

BADGES, employees on passenger trains to wear, - 299 

of policemen, - - - - - -310 

BAGGAGE, willful injury to, how punished, - - 322 
BONDS, issue and sale of by companies, - - - 293 
roads may he mortgaged to secure, - 293 
bona fide owners may bring suit on in his own name, - 312 
loans to company may be secured by, - - 292 
rate of interest, - 292 
registry and certification, &c, by comptroller, - 292 
may not be of less denomination than one hundred dol- 
lars, - - - - - - 292 

certain towns exempt from taxation, - - 318 
BONDHOLDERS,— see " Trustees." 

trustees for may gain possession of property mortgaged 

how, - - - - - - 293 

any one may bring petition for surrender of property to, 

after default of payment, ... 293 
BRAKEMEN, number of on passenger trains, - 306, 327 



342 INDEX. 

BRIDGES, footways on, - - - - - 290 

height of roof, - - - - 321,328 

penalty for committing nuisance upon, - - 321 

expense at highway crossing, how borne, - - 321 

of Shore Line at Conn. Riv. may be secured, how, - 325 

CARS, to be provided with connecting aprons, - - 304 

passengers to be provided with water, - - 298 

to wear cards designating direction, &c, - - 299 

climbing on prohibited, - 301 

minors not to climb upon, - - - - 301 

CATTLE-GUARDS, how and where to be constructed, - 283 

CHECKS, to be given for baggage, &c, - - 299 

COMMISSIONERS, how appointed, &c, - - • 257 

to take oath, ------ 258 

may employ experts on special occasions, - - 258 

office to be kept at Hartford, - 326 

to give certificate before road is open for travel, - 290 

to keep record of complaints, &c, - - - 258 
to cause notices forbidding loitering of children, &c, to 
be posted, - - - - - -301 

duty of, in case of accidents, ... 308 

proceedings by, on complaint of competing roads, - 296 

on petition for location of station house, 285 

may apply for injunction, when, ... 265 

directors of road to make returns to, - - 265 
form of returns to, - - - - 267-272 

penalty for obstructing, in discharge of their duty, - 267 

to make report to general assembly, - - - 273 
to receive no compensation before the auditing of their 

accounts, - - - - - 261 

accounts of, how audited, - - - - 260 

to pass free, and take with them persons in their official 

employ, ..-..-- 258 
compensation of, - - - - - 258, 259 

duty of, - ... 260, 298, 302 

appeals from in matter of crossing water courses, 

&c, ----- 1869, 322 

special services, by whom paid, ... 259 

to visit and inspect roads, - - - - 261 

to give notice of intention to examine roads, - - 261 



INDEX.* 343 

COMMISSIONERS may order repairs, - - - 261 

orders of, how enforced, - 262, 263 

directions of, how given, - - - - 264 

shall prescribe limits, &c, - 273 

COMMUTATION not to be abolished, when, - - 291 

COMPLAINTS, State's attorney to make, - - 280 

commissioners to keep record of, - - - 258 

COMPANIES, to be governed by the statute, except when 

otherwise provided by their charters, - - 255 
petition- for incorporation of, notice to be advertised, 314 
to be accompanied by report of an en- 
gineer, - - - - 286 
notice of, to designate the proposed 

route, - 284 

officers and organization of, - - - - 255 
embezzlement of funds, or false entries by, how 

punished, - - - - - 311 
president, &c, of company, out of the state, not eligible 

to similar office here, - - 255 

to maintain supervision of the road, - 256 

meetings of, how called, - 256 

voting in, -on proxies, &c, regulated, - - 256 

directors of, how chosen, their number, &c., - 255 

to make annual report to the commissioners, - - 266 

penalty for refusal of, to testify before commissioners, 266 

orders of, how made and notified, - 263 

to maintain fence along highways, - - 1869, 319 

powers of to make contracts with another, - - 320 

towns not liable for injuries on highways from acts of, 321 

may require security from contractors, - - - 311 

to furnish seats, - - - - - 263 

not liable for damages where road is discontinued, - 274 

may change location, when, ... 277 

liability for highways taken, ... - 277 

not applicable to horse railroads, - 278 

to maintain fence on line of road, when, - - 281 

penalty, - - 282 

may establish tolls, ----- 291 

prohibited from abolishing commutation, when, - 291 

COMPANIES, to afford mutual facilities, • - 295, 296, 320 

to furnish drinking water for passengers, - - 298 



344 * INDEX. 

COMPANIES, consolidation of, not authorized, - 
formation of, &c, 

may take land for road purposes, - 

i SI 1 

corporate powers may cease unless, 

merger of Hartford & New Haven and New York & 
New Haven, 
CONDUCTORS, to wear badges, - 
CONNECTIONS, with other roads, how enforced, 
CONTRACTS, validated, ------ 

CROSSINGS, of water courses, streams and ponds (1869), 

appeal from commissioner's orders a supersedeas, 

(1869) - - " " 

stoppage of trains before, - 
bell or whistle to sound at, - 
warning boards at, 

hand cars not to be left on the track near, 
expense of unsuccessful application for gate at, 
of N. H. & Derby and Naugatuck, expense of providing 

against accidents, how borne, 
management of trains at highway, - 
expense of, how borne, 
DAMAGES, LAND, and when and how to be paid. - 289, 321 

for loss of life, &c, 
distribution of, for injury, - 
roads not to be worked until paid, 
DEPOTS, establishment of, 

penalty for committing nuisances at, - 
children may not loiter at, - 
name to be placed on passenger, 
DIRECTORS, how chosen, number of, &c, 

to make returns to commissioners. - ". b |_> 

refusal to testify before commissioners, how punished, 

,. . 332 

powers ot, - 
DRAWBRIDGES, trains, to stop before, &c, (1869), - 

commissioners may authorize trains to pass without stop- 

_ oUo 

p ing ' " • . , «i i 

EMBEZZLEMENT, of funds, how punished, - 
ENGINEERS, to receive copies of act, 

to be sworn, 

liability for violating law, de whistle. &c, 



335 
299 



276 

323 

305 
302 
280 
280 

279 

325 
262 

325 



307 
274 
284 
312 
301 
302 
25 1 



303 
303 
303 



INDEX. 345 

ENGINEERS, how punished for neglect of duty, - 303 

report to accompany articles of association, - - 330 

EXAMINATION, of roads, how made, - - - 259 

EXECUTION, how levied against company, - - - 312 

FARE, general assembly to regulate, ... 320 

fraud in payment of, how punished, ... 292 

FENCE, upon highways (1869), 319 

upon line of road, .... 275,319 

lien upon land, expense for, when, - 283 

companies to maintain, when adjoining a highway, - 283 

FIRE, damage by, from locomotive, - - - 312 

FLAGMEN, when and where, - - - - 278 

GAMBLING, upon trains, how punished, 

GATES, commissioners may order, .... 277 

HIGHWAY, crossing of, - 262 

height of bridges over, 1871, - - - - 326 

freight trains may not obstruct, - - - 263 
lay out of, across railroads, .... 324 

companies to maintain fence, - - - 319 

INCORPORATION, advertisement of notice, - - 313 

notice to designate route, - - - - 313 

to be accompanied by report of engineer, - - 314 

LANDS, how taken for railroad purposes, - - 273, 290 

adverse possession of, - - - - -318 

plan of to be deposited with the town clerk, - - 275 

owners of, may require plan of, - - - 274 

owner may recover actual damages, - - 274 

owners of, when to fence, and how compelled, 282 

LIENS on road for material furnished for construction, - 328 

LISTS, board of equalization shall amend and correct, - 317 

LOCATION, to be filed with secretary of state, - - 275 

may be altered, ..... 288 

of stations, ------ 284 

of N. H. & Derby R. R. approved, - - - 324 

LOCOMOTIVE, to have bell and whistle, - - - 302 

penalty for injuring, - - - 311 

climbing upon prohibited, ... - 301 

minors may not climb upon, ... 301 

MEETINGS, of company, how called, - - - 256 

who may vote at and upon what shares, - - 256 

NUISANCE, on bridges, how punished, - - - 321 

44 



346 INDEX. 

OFFICERS, and organization of companies, - - 255 

PENALTY, for neglect to make repairs, - - - 261 

PLATFORM and outbuildings at depots, - - - 259 

POLICE, appointments of, &c, - - - ' 309 

PRESIDENT, who ineligible, - - - - 255 

duty of supervisor, .... 256 

PROXIES, voting on regulated, - - - - 256 

RECEIPTS, for freight, &c, - - . - - 291 

REPAIRS, orders for, by commissioners, - 261 

REPORTS, to general assembly, by commissioners, - 273 

RETURN, directors, to make, - - - - 266 

form of, to commissioners, - - - - 267-272 

SIGNALS, commissioners to advise adoption, - - 263 

penalty for neglect to place, ... 280 

penalty for willful injury to electric, - 326 

SPEED, rate of, - . - - - - 263 

STATIONS, at or near villages, - - - - 287 

when not to be discontinued, ... 286 

abandoned, to be re-established, when, - 286 

loitering at, how punished, - 300, 301 

water closets at, 298 

name to be placed on passenger depot, - - 302 

STOCK, shares of, to be -personal estate, - 257 

shares, owned by towns, voting on (1869), - - 322 

assessments upon, how made and collected, - - 257 

SWITCH, penalty for displacing, 307 
switchman to stand at junction, ... 306 

TAX, imposed on companies, - - - - 315 

certain town bonds exempt from (1869), - - 318 

may be deducted from amount due, - - 316 

lessors by lessees, - - - - -316 

forfeiture for neglect to make returns and pay, - 317 

TICKET, offices, opening of, - - - - - 262 

TOWNS, shares of, how voted on (1869), - - 319 

not liable for injury on highway, when (1869), - 319 

TRUSTEES, property to be surrendered to, when, - 293 

may release" interest of corporation, when, - - 318 

in possession, rights of, ... - 289 

TRUSTEES, to make inventory, - - - - 294 

liability of, time limited, ... - 293 



index. 347 

TRUSTEES, to render quarterly accounts, - 294 

may charge expenses, - 295 

may foreclose, - 294 

may be removed for cause, - 295 

WAY, right of, how obtained, - - . 276 

limitation of time for procuring, - 273 

WHISTLE, or BELL, to sound at crossing - - . 302 



EIGHTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Commissioner of Insurance 



OF CONNECTICUT. 



PART FIRST. 

FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE. 



HARTFORD: 

PRESS OF CASE, LOCKWOOD & BRAINARD. 

1873. 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OF INSURANCE 



PART FIRST. 

FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives in Gren- 
■ ■ eral Assembly convened : 

The Commissioner of Insurance has the honor to submit here- 
with Part I of the Eighth Annual Report on the business of In- 
surance iu this State, which exhibits- the financial condition of 
ninety-eight Fire and Fire-Marine Insurance Companies, author- 
ized to transact business in Connecticut, compiled from the sworn 
statements of the companies rendered to this Department, in 
accordance with the "Act of 1871," and by the annexed tabula 
tions and detailed abstracts of statements, clearly exhibiting their 
financial condition on the 31st day of December, 1872, and their 
business transactions for the year preceding. The immense 
labor involved in the valuation of more than half a million of life 
policies, covering upwards of a billion and a half of insurance, in 
order to determine the reserve liability of each company, inevit- 
ably delays the second part of the report for several weeks be- 
yond the opening of the session of the General Assembly. This 
work, however, is well advanced, and summations can be reached 
shortly, and the Life Report submitted at an even earlier date 
than last year. 

With a single exception, excusable perhaps under the circum- 
stances, the Annual Returns of the companies were promptly 
filed on or before the expiration of the time allowed by law. A 
general readiness to comply promptly with the reasonable require- 
ments of the Insurance Statutes of this State has at all times 
been manifested, and this spirit the Commissioner has endeavored 
to courteously reciprocate, while exacting the fullest measure of 
compliance with law. On the next page will be found a full 
directory of all the Fire and Fire-Marine Insurance Companies 
represented in this Report. 



IV 



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Vlll REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

THE EXPERIENCE OP 1872. 

This Report covers another year of severe trial to the fire in- 
surance capital of the country. The hope expressed in the last 
Report that the disastrous record of 1871 might long remain an 
exceptional one, fell far short of realization in the results of 1872. 
But once in the history of American fire underwriting have the 
companies been subjected to a severer test, and that so recently, 
with an intervening fire record so exceptionally heavy as to 
have effectually precluded their restoration to anything like the 
financial strength that withstood the shock of the unparalleled 
Chicago disaster. 

During the first half of the past year the record of constantly 
occurring fires was daily swelled until nearly every center of 
business and population had furnished its quota to the fearful 
aggregate. A partial pause in the general destruction extending 
over July, August, September, and October, enabled the com- 
panies to so far repair the ravages of the year as to meet the 
Boston calamity with unimpaired capitals, but in the majority of 
cases without any considerable amounts of surplus accumulations. 
Although the amount of insurance ($56,483,000) held by 188 
companies upon property situated in the burnt district of Boston 
was but 61 per cent, of the amount ($92,000,000) held on pro- 
perty destroyed at Chicago, yet its demands upon the companies 
were felt with almost equal severity. Though the list of bank- 
rupt companies for 1872 (thirty-four) is but half that of 1871, 
yet it includes several of the oldest companies, which had been 
considered eminently sound, conservative, and prosperous, up to 
the time of their sudden overthrow by the Boston conflagration. 
Notably was this the case with several of the Boston companies 
which were inevitably ruined, in consequence of the unavoidable 
concentration of risks attending the transaction of a business 
largely or wholly local. Twenty-two of the twenty-five Boston 
companies immediately suspended, though two of the number 
effected arrangements with their policy-holders by which they 
were speedily enabled to resume business. The remaining twenty 
passed into the hands of Receivers. 

Thirty of the thirty-one joint stock companies of Massachusetts 
were involved at Boston, and twenty-two permanently closed their 
doors. Five of the latter class were at the time doing business 



OP CONNECTICUT. IX 

in Connecticut, viz : the Bay State and Peoples, of Worcester ; 
the Exchange, Howard, and National, of Boston. The revoca- 
tion of their certificates, left but one of six stock companies 
formerly authorized, to represent Massachusetts in this State. 
This company, the Springfield Fire and Marine, was a loser 
by the Boston fire to the amount of $250,000.00, and with cus- 
tomary energy and enterprise, voluntarily levied an assessment 
of 80 per cent, on its capital stock, which was paid in before the 
close of the year, making, with the assessment following the Chi- 
cago fire, 90 per cent of its capital stock contributed within four- 
teen months by the stockholders of this company to maintain its 
deservedly high position. 

Tiie losses of the Boston companies ranged from $112,500 to 
$2,844,354;, and aggregated -$32,680,332, of which $31,792,215 
was represented. by insolvent companies, with assets only amount- 
ing to $14,980,332, or a ratio of Boston losses to gross assets of 
207. Fifty -two Massachusetts Companies, Stock and Mutual, 
were involved at Boston in amounts varying from $500 to $2,844,- 
S54, and aggregating $35,750,104, or more than 63 per cent, of the 
entire insurance loss. Twenty-six, or just half of this number, 
were ruined irretrievably, while but six companies of other States 
were rendered insolvent, and two of these were able to pay losses 
in full. These facts, taken in connection with the disastrous 
failures of the local companies at Chicago thirteen months 
previously, are a sufficient argument against the accumulation of 
risks in limited areas of territory, attending the excessive patron- 
age of local companies. 

One hundred and eighty-eight companies, American and foreign, 
reported losses by the Boston fire, and of this number seventy- 
eight were at the time doing business in Connecticut. In addition 
to the five Massachusetts companies mentioned, the Humboldt, 
International, Market, and Washington, of New York, and the 
National, of Maine, suspended business and passed into the hands 
of Receivers, the Triumph, of Cincinnati, voluntarily re-insured 
its risks in the Amazon of the same place, and retired from busi- 
ness. The Firemen's, of New York, retired within the borders of 
its own State. All other embarrassed companies have effected a 
restoration of capital and continue business, as shown hereafter. 

The whole number of buildings destroyed by the Boston fire was 
776, and it is a remarkable fact that 709 were of brick and stone, 
2 



X REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

and only 67 of wood. The mean estimates place the value of 
buildings destroyed at $15,000,000, value of contents $65,000,- 
000, or a total of about $80,000,000 of the accumulated wealth of 
the country swept away in twenty-four hours by a conflagration, 
that— beginning at a single point, on a calm November evening — 
moved on in its resistless course until it had enveloped and laid 
in ruins sixty-five acres of substantial granite, brick and brown 
stone buildings, defying all efforts opposed to its progress, by a 
confessedly superior fire department, liberally aided from 
adjacent cities, and wielding all the superior modern appliances 
for the arrest and extinction of fire. 

This calamity, the second of its kind within thirteen months, 
and second also in extent to the greatest conflagration of modern 
times, justly startled the insurance world more signally than its 
predecessor. 

The Chicago fire was universally regarded as an entirely ab- 
normal occurrence resulting from a fortuitous conjunction of cir- 
cumstances, improbable of repetition within half a century. The 
warning sounded to sister cities was scarcely heeded, comment 
upon the disaster, and speculation as to the possibility of similar 
visitations lasted the usually brief period allotted to important 
passing events, and as its novelty faded, so faded from the public 
mind the important practical lessons it was eminently calculated 
to teach. Sixty-seven Insurance Companies went down in the 
general ruin, but the survivors although in the majority of cases 
seriously crippled, were not disheartened. The unparalled de- 
mands upon their resources were met and discharged in a manner 
that reflected great credit on American fire underwriting. In 
every necessary instance the stockholders of companies not hope- 
lessly bankrupt, promptly came forward and made up all deficien- 
cies in confident expectation of immunity from similar trials in the 
near future. The Boston fire rudely upset this confidence, while 
signally subverting heretofore accepted rules and theories of 
fire underwriting in densely built cities, and demonstrated, that 
dry seasons, prairie gales, a preponderance of wooden buildings, 
and exhausted or inefficient fire departments were not indispensa- 
ble conditions to a great conflagration ; but that even so-called fire 
proof structures offer feeble resistance (if not welcome fuel) to 
the flames, whenever they attain sufficient volume to become un- 
manageable. 



OP CONNECTICUT. XI 

That an area of sixty -five acres of confessedly substantial brick 
aud stone buildings could be thus laid in ashes in a day and 
night is an appalling fact, that may well cause sister cities to 
tremble in view of its possibility, aud rouse them to the necessity 
of adopting all possible precautions against so terrible a visita- 
tion. It is a favorable sign that some of our largest cities are 
moving in this direction. While to the wretchedly narrow streets 
of Boston, to lofty buildings perforated by elevator flues, and sur- 
mounted by Mansard roofs and to inadequate fire opposing appli- 
ances whether skillfully or otherwise handled, we give all due 
responsibility for the extent of this latest calamity, yet the inquiry 
is pertinent, (the above enumerated disadvantages to the contrary 
notwithstanding,) what other American city can point to an 
equally dense precinct that offers a less inviting field for a great 
conflagration than that which was reduced to ruins on the 9th 
and 10th of November. It is a notorious fact that in nearly all 
our cities, great and small, building regulations are so loose, or 
their enforcement so lax, that in a majority of cases buildings 
are constructed with .the most reckless disregard of the common- 
est precautions against fire. Sham structures rising story upon 
story of imposing and ornamental exterior, and combustible in- 
terior, divided, if divided at all, by slender partition walls, are the 
order of the. day in the densest precincts, and their erection is 
permitted by municipal authorities in all our cities, for whose 
culpable negligence to make or enforce suitable building regula- 
tions the insurance capital is annually called upon to pay one 
hundred fold the additional cost of safe construction, and the in- 
dustries of the country proportionally taxed in turn, by enhanced 
rates, to reimburse the companies. Defective chimneys, steam 
pipes, hot air flues, &c, ramifying in all directions in close con- 
tact with the most inflammable wood, may be found not only in 
the cheaper class of buildings, but also in the most costly and im- 
posing, and a critical survey rather excites astonishment that 
ignition should not occur more frequently where opportunities are 
so abundant. What proportion of the innumerable fires that have 
occured at nearly every centre of business and population through- 
out the country during the past year, may be attributed to " de- 
fective construction,'' it is of course impossible to approximate, in 
the absence of statistics of the combined experience of the com- 
panies, but experienced underwriters estimate that not more 



XU REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

than twenty-five per cent, of all fires have a purely accidental 
origin, against which all reasonable precautions had been taken. 
A still larger percentage it is claimed is traceable to fraud and 
incendiarism, and the remainder to gross carelessness in the 
storage of dangerous material and in the management of lighting 
and heating apparatus, or culpable negligence in the construction 
of the latter. 

Undeniably the system of insurance is itself indirectly respon- 
sible for a large percentage of the increase of crime and careless- 
ness, as the temptation to either is in exact ratio to the prospect 
of individual profit by, or indemnity from, its consequences. This 
in a measure is unavoidable, and is a part of the price which the 
insuring public is called upon to pay for the benefits of insurance. 
But aside from this indirect responsibility, inherent in almost all 
systems of indemnity, there is a direct responsibility to be laid at 
the doors of the companies for the too prevalent practice of insur- 
ing property at its full value, in flagrant defiance of their own 
theories and dearly bought experience. This practice which 
makes the insured the guardian of the insurers' interests solely, 
in the exercise of due care and caution for the protection of his 
property, fearfully enhances the " moral hazard " and yields its 
legitimate fruit in constantly increasing crime. Careless or in- 
competent or unprincipled agents who have an eye single to 
their commissions, are its ready abettors, and unless greater care 
is exercised by the managers of the companies for the correction 
of this evil, legislative action will ultimately become necessary to 
devolve upon the insured an adequate percentage of the risk to 
secure proper vigilance on his part. 

Apart from the question of the numerical increase of fires, there 
is another phase of the subject equally suggestive, for which the 
insurance system cannot be held responsible; that is, their in- 
creased destrnctiveness. This is partially accounted for by en- 
larged business operations and the greater concentration of values 
within limited areas : this however ought to be mainly offset by 
the modern improvements in fire extinguishing apparatus. Bat 
despite the improvements and the thorough organization of paid 
fire departments kept constantly on duty, and the use of the tele- 
graph and other means for their prompt alarm, the relative de- 
strnctiveness of fires has increased to a degree that clearly indi- 
cates that the present means and appliances are inadequate for 
their prompt extinction. 



OP CONNECTICUT. Xlll 

The improvements in steam fire engines, the main reliance of 
all our cities, although* great, have not kept pace with the de- 
mands made upon them by the modern city practice of piling 
story upon story, and surmounting the whole with a lumber yard 
in the form of a Mansard roof. Recent experiments have shown 
buildings of this character to be beyond the capacity of the largest 
and best engines now in use, and it is questionable if any can be 
so enlarged and improved in construction as to do effectual service 
in combatting fire at these heights, even under far more favorable 
circumstances than attend the efforts of firemen in the narrow 
streets of a crowded city. The Mansard roof, justly popular for 
its great architectural beauty, is not objectionable in itself, but 
becomes so from the American mode of construction, being in 
almost every case of wood, and often beginning far above the 
point at which it should have terminated in consulting safety. 

In addition to the dangers presented by this style of architec- 
ture, at no time in the past have so many articles of a combusti- 
ble nature entered so largely into trade and the multitudinous 
manufactures as at the present day, and their increasing use de- 
mands increased precautions in their storage, radical improve- 
ments in the construction of receptacles therefor, and the general 
adoption of local means and appliances kept constantly in readi- 
ness to combat fire on the instant of its discovery. In all our 
large cities sweeping reforms in the construction of new build- 
ings, and careful investigations, by competent authority, of all 
existing buildings in dense districts, for the removal, as far as 
possible, of impending danger, are imperatively demanded, if the 
country is to be spared the repetition of the recent calamities in 
the near future, and the present insurance capital preserved from 
total annihilation. 

In the meantime the majority of the immediate custodians ol 
this capital, the officers of the companies, are wisely heeding the 
recent lessons. The current year has witnessed a marked reform, 
seen in the maintenance of adecpiate rates, in the reduction of 
lines of insurance, in the classification and redistribution of city 
risks, and in the sifting of agencies, an example which all will 
do well to emulate. 

The exhibits made in this report of capital reduced, capital im- 
paired, surplus accumulations depleted or exhausted, though the 
result of exceptional disasters, against which no underwriting 



X1V REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

foresight could provide, nevertheless tells its own story of the 
unwillingness or inability of stockholders after the results of the 
past eighteen months, to persevere in these costly experiments, 
unless reasonably assured of future immunity, and fair remuner- 
ation for the capital invested and risk incurred. The indomita- • ■ 
ble courage that has stood the test of two assessments in so short 
a time; cannot be expected to withstand another trial of like 
character, until at least the experience has been varied by a sea- 
son of prosperity that shall relieve it of its monotony. Fire in- 
surance stockholders do not profess to be philanthropists disinter- 
estedly immolating their surplus capital on the altar of the public 
weal. Their capital it is true is exposed to the contingency of 
loss in extraordinary emergencies, but its periodical absorption 
is not contemplated in any theory on which the conduct of a suc- 
cessful business is based. It is primarily the guarantee of the 
ability and will of the company to protect all its policy-holders, 
and liquidate all claims of its creditors, and for its hypothecation 
to this purpose, a percentage of earnings from the business trans- 
acted proportioned to the risk incurred is reasonably expected. 
If this expectation is not justified by future experience, the pres- 
ent system of insurance will ultimately become a thing of the 
past from the natural indisposition of capitalists to invest their 
money in enterprises at once hazardous and unprofitable. 

It is a fact significant of the manner in which the business has 
been conducted, that in reviewing the experience, individual and 
combined, of over fifty companies from 1868 to 1871, but not in- 
cluding the Chicago fire, that the average premium rate in the 
case of nearly every company, as well as the general average of 
the whole, shows a steady depression extending along the°four 
years and reaching its lowest point just before the Chicago fire, 
while at the same time the ratio of aggregate losses paid° to ag- 
gregate premiums received rose steadily through each successive 
year, as follows : ratio of aggregate losses paid by fifty-one com- 
panies, to aggregate premium received ; 44.50 for 1868 ■ 49 89 
for 1869; -56.78 for 1870 ; 60.23 for 1871, not including the 
Chicago fire, but including the latter 98.19 ; and for 1872, includ- 
ing Boston, 91.18. 

Leaving out of the question the exceptional results of the 
Chicago and Boston fires, the ratios of the three years and nine 
months previous would indicate an indifference to the laws of 



OF CONNECTICUT. xv 

profit and loss in the conduct of the business that would argue 
poorly tor the business sagacity of its managers, were it not well 
understood that the powerful competition between the companies, 
together with the constant popular pressure for cheap insurance, 
too often leave the most conservative and responsible no alterna- 
tive but to accept current rates or retire from the field. The 
better class of insurance officers appreciate the dangers that beset 
their capital quite as clearly as their critics, and the difficulties 
of reform far more so ; but they are powerless to effect reforms 
single handed, and organizations for this purpose have heretofore 
proved of temporary duration. The present national organiza- 
tion thus far gives promise of better things. 



THE NATIONAL BOARD OF FIRE UNDERWRITERS. 

This Board, with its numerous local adjuncts, has been reor- 
ganized on an efficient basis during the past year, and nearly all 
responsible and conservative companies have subscribed to its 
rules, and in the light of past experience seem disposed at pres- 
ent to maintain its schedules of premium rates. Only by con- 
certed action of this character can the companies hope to 
maintain their present status and repair the ravages of the past 
two years. Similar unions for mutual protection in emergencies, 
have of late years invariably been shortlived, usually terminating 
in ill-feeling and mutual recriminations. But it may be hoped 
that recent disastrous experiences have convinced both officers 
and agents of the necessity of living up to its requirements, in 
good faith, in order to insure its continuance and reap its bene- 
fits. There is little danger that this organization will abuse its 
powers, as the singular want of confidence ordinarily existing 
among its members makes it at all times more difficult to hold 
together than to dissolve. The constant and powerful compe- 
tition to which all aspirants for public patronage are exposed, 
precludes the possibility of advancing rates to, or at least 
maintaining them for any length of time, at exorbitant figures, 
and underwriting statistics abundantly prove that on an average 
the insuring public has paid too little rather than too much for 
insurance. 

But an organization that aims no higher than the establishment 



XVI REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

and maintenance of arbitrary schedules of rates without reli- 
able data for their basis, will prove as shortlived as those that 
have preceded it. It is a singular fact that fire underwriters 
have never attempted a compilation of their combined experience 
with the various classes of risks insured, from which an approxi- 
mate knowledge of the cost of insuring each class might be ob- 
tained. Invaluable as these statistics would prove, and palpable 
as is the necessity therefor, no attempt has ever been made for 
their classification. Such a classification would legitimately come 
within the scope, and secure the permanancy and usefulness of a 
National Board, and would he practicable, if each company would 
contribute its fund of experience for the benefit of the whole, in- 
stead of hiding it under lock and key. 

In these statistics the Chicago and Boston fires should be in- 
cluded, as similar visitations are not improbable in the present 
stage of American architecture. Rates based upon such data 
might be accepted with reasonable safety, the business would be 
placed on a safer footing, and the insuring public be more 
speedily educated to the necessity of paying cost for the indem- 
nity sought, in order to the preservation of this great conserving 
interest. 

COMPANIES ADMITTED IN 1872. 

The following is a complete list of companies admitted to trans- 
act the business of Fire and Fire Marine Insurance in this State 
during 1872. With a few exceptions (not yet reached for want 
of time) they have all been subjected to examination at the home 
office, when statements for admission have been unaccompanied 
by a certificate of standing from the official having charge of in- 
surance interests in the State where the company is located. 

This list comprises 28 companies possessing capital ranging 
from one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, the lowest limit 
allowed by the laws of this State, to one million dollars. Two of 
these companies, the Market and Washington of New Fork, that 
had suspended after the Chicago fire, and only perfected their 
reorganization during the first quarter of the year, and recom- 
menced business, were again bankrupted by the Boston confla- 
gration. 



OP CONNECTICUT. 



XV11 



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The amounts opposite the Lancashire and London Assurance 
indicate the amount of the United States deposit, at the time of 
admission. The Pacific Mutual Marine having no capital stock, 
the gross assets of the company are given. 



SUSPENDED AND WITHDRAWN. 

In addition to the twelve companies already mentioned in an- 
other connection as having withdrawn immediately after the 
Boston fire, five others require notice under this head. The 
Union Insurance Company of San Francisco, formerly authorized 
in this State, reinsured all its risks east of the Rocky Mountains 
3 



XV111 REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

in the Liverpool London and Globe Insurance Company and re- 
tired from the eastern field July 1, 1872. 

The Andes Insurance Company of Cincinnati, after reducing 
its capital in July from $1,000,000 to 1500,000, finally suspended 
business September 16th, "in consequence of developments made 
by an exhaustive examination, instituted by the Insurance Super- 
intendent of Ohio, which showed that the entire capital of the com- 
pany, and $200,000 of its assets in addition, had been swallowed 
up by the fearfully heavy losses sustained during the first half of 
the year. The settlement of claims is not yet completed and the 
basis of adjustment cannot be given. 

The Eastern Insurance Company of Bangor, in its annual state- 
ment, reported an impairment of $92,888.61, or 46.44 per cent., 
in consequence of a Boston loss of $192,000. Being advised by 
the Commissioner of Maine that a voluntary assessment was in 
process of collection with every prospect of success, additional 
time was granted the company. In the absence of enabling leg- 
islation, difficulties were subsequently encountered that compelled 
a temporary suspension of business in this State until such time 
as its capital should be fully restored. Under a special Act since 
secured the company is now enforcing collection, and will speedily 
be placed on a solvent basis. 

The Merchants and Farmers Mutual withdrew at the close of 
the year, in consequence of inability to comply with the " Acf of 
1872," requiring a deposit of $i:>0,000, having lost $890,000 of 
its $415,000 cash assets by the Boston fire. It is as well to men- 
tion here that the Holyoke Mutual, though a heavy loser, raised 
a guarantee fund of $100,000, and subsequently filed a certificate 
of the deposit of $150,000, and continues business in this State. 

The Lycoming of Pennsylvania (Mutual), temporarily sus- 
pended its agencies in this State pending the collection of its an- 
nual assessment, when the company will be in condition to fully 
comply with the requirement of the law above mentioned. 

As the net result of admissions, withdrawals, and supensions, 
the whole number of fire companies now authorized in this State 
is ninety-eight, classified as follows : Connecticut, 27, eleven 
stock and sixteen mutual ; New York, 31 ; Pennsylvania, 13 ; 
Rhode Island, 7 ; Ohio, 3 ; Massachusetts, 2, one stock and one 
mutual ; Maine, 2 ; New Jersey, 2 ; Illinois, 1 ; California, 1 ; 
Missouri, 1 ; Foreign Companies, 8. 



OP CONNECTICUT. XIX 



CONNECTICUT COMPANIES. 



Eight companies, viz : the iEtna, Connecticut, Fairfield 
County. Hartford, Meriden, National, Orient, and Phoenix, were 
involved at Boston in amounts ranging from $30,000 to $1,623,- 
600. and aggregating $3,222,326, as shown by special statements 
made to this office December 2d. This loss was subsequently 
reduced by salvages, etc., to $2,990,275. Although all of the com- 
panies were seriously affected by this severe reverse, none were 
crippled to an extent requiring a supension of business. The 
condition of the JEtna necessitated a reduction of capital, and a 
meeting of its stockholders was held December 28th, at which it 
was voted to reduce the capital stock to $2,000,000, and voted 
subsequently to increase again to the former amount of $3,000,- 
000, ten per cent, of the stock to be immediately called in, and the 
remainder by installments during the present year. The new stock 
was promptly subscribed, and present indications assure the com- 
plete restoration of the former capital within a few months. This, 
with the new capital subscribed after the Chicago fire, makes 
$2,500,000, or 83 1-3 per cent, of the full capital of the company 
made \ip by its stockholders to maintain its position at the head 
of the list of Fire Insurance Companies. 

The National Fire Insurance Company showed an impairment 
slightly beyond the limit allowed by law, and promptly called a 
meeting of the stockholders for December 20th, which voted a 
reduction of capital to $350,000, and afterwards voted unani- 
mously to increase to the former amount of $500,000 ; the sub- 
scriptions to the new stock payable on or before December 27th. 
An official examination made January 10th, showed the same to 
have been fully paid and secured as required by law. The busi- 
nesslike manner in which this company, so recently organized, 
met this emergency is characteristic of its management, which 
sustains it in the front rank of the reliable companies of its 
class. 

As the condition of the remaining Hartford companies did not 
require action none was taken by the Commissioner, beyond the 
usual verification of statements by examination. The promptness 
with which all the Connecticut companies involved, announced 
their readiness to pay losses in full and amply protect their policy- 
holders at whatever sacrifice, had no small effect in restoring 



XX REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

confidence and preventing a panic in the insurance world, while 
this manifestion of the ability of those companies that had suffered 
so recently at Chicago, to meet this second severe strain, justly 
excited a reasonable State pride in the resources of those old 
and well-tried Connecticut institutions. 

The Fairfield County Fire Insurance Company of South Norwalk, 
by special statement of December 2d, showed an impairment of 
16.23 per cent., but serious losses at several points during Decem- 
ber increased the impairment to 26.02 as revealed by the Com- 
pany's Annual Statement, which was verified by examination 
January 17th. A requisition was at once made upon the com- 
pany to make up the deficiency. A stockholders' meeting, held 
January 29th, voted a 25 per cent, reduction, and a like increase. 
The new stock was at once subscribed and the whole amount 
($50,000) paid in February 28th, as shown by a personal ex- 
amination made March 3d, and certificates to that effect were 
immediately granted. The Annual and Supplemental Statements 
of this company are both given in the abstracts herewith sub- 
mitted, but the figures representing assets and liabilities in the 
tabulations, are taken from the latter, as of most interest to the 
policy-holders of the company. This course has also been pur- 
sued with all those companies whose condition, December 31st, 
rendered a supplemental statement necessary. 

COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 

The Arctic of New York, by its Annual Statement, showed an 
impairment of $78,709.44, or 31.80 per cent. ; an assessment of 
33J per cent, was in process of collection when an amendment 
to the company's charter reducing capital from $250,000 to $200,- 
000 was obtained, and the amount of the assessment already 
secured made good the remaining deficiency. 

The Brewers and Maltsters of New York, shows the highest im- 
pairment within the limit allowed by law, but as the company has 
no agents working in this State for the present year, a supple- 
mental statement has not been called for, though the company is 
known to have reduced its impairment to within 12 per cent. 

The Equitable Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Provi- 
dence was impaired, December 31st, 79.03 per cent., or $237,- 
112.99, but accompanying the Annual Statement was a supple- 
mental one, with papers, showing the capital of the company to 



OF CONNECTICUT. XXI 

have been reduced to $200,000, and an assessment of $140,000 
to have been paid in cash by its stockholders, leaving a small 
net surplus. 

The Merchants Insurance Company of the same city, prior to 
December 31st, had levied an assessment of 50 per cent. ($100,- 
000), one half of which was collected before the close of the 
year. The supplemental statement of February 20th showed the 
impairment of capital to be reduced to 3^ per cent. 

The last company requiring mention in this connection is the 
Pennsylvania of Philadelphia. The Annual Statement of this 
company showed an impairment of $133,141.54, or 33.36 per 
cent. An assessment of 50 per cent. ($200,000) had been 
levied, of which $126,150 was collected at the time of filing the 
annual statement. A supplemental statement of March 1st 
showed a full restoration of the capital of the company. 

The condition of the companies referred to being produced by 
a great public calamity, and not through any fault of their man- 
agement, the Commissioner felt justified in granting these ex- 
tensions of time when the ability and the will to make up the 
deficiencies were manifested, and the result has proven that the 
interests of policy-holders were best subserved by judicious for- 
bearance and assistance. The adoption of this course by the In- 
surance officials of the several States doubtless rescued many 
companies that would otherwise have been precipitated into bank- 
ruptcy. It is not possible under exceptional circumstances to ex- 
ecute the law to the letter without defeating its purpose. 

FOREIGN INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Eight foreign companies are now authorized to transact busi- 
ness in this State ; the London Assurance and Lancashire having 
been admitted during the year. 

The risks written by these companies in the United States 
during 1872 aggregate $1,167,812,424, and the premiums re- 
ceived thereon $11,775,196, being an increase over risks written 
in 1871 of $345,414,005, and an increase over premiums received 
in 1871 of $3,370,867. 

The risks written in this State in 1872 were $18,892,535, and the 
premiums received therefor were $259,789. The aggregate net 
income of these companies in the United States in 1872 was 
$11,661,623, and the aggregate expenditures were $13,172,057, 



XX11 



REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 



being an excess of expenditures over income of $1,520,434. 
The aggregate income of these companies in 1871 was $8,655,- 
250, and their aggregate expenditures were $9,929,582, being an 
excess of expenditures over income of $1,274,332. 

The total loss of these companies upon their business in the 
United States during 1871 and 1872 was $2,794,766. This loss, 
occasioned by the great fires at Chicago and Boston, was covered 
by remittances from the home office making recourse to the assets 
of the companies in this country unnecessary. 

The following tables show the assets and liabilities of the sev- 
eral foreign companies in this country December 31, 1871, and 
December 31, 1872, and their income and expenditures during 
1871 and 1872 : 

1871. 





Assets . 


Liabilities. 


Income. 


Expenditures. 


Commercial Union, 


$346,037 


SI 27,839 


$201,293 


$12o..'J72 


Imperial, 


1,064,647 


535,107 


1,215,894 


1,023,279 


Liverpool, London and Globe, 


3,640,449 


2,387,855 


3,163,901 


5,122,653 


North British and Mercantile, 


1,565,351 


904,469 


3,363,377 


3,208,944 


Queen, 


722,413 


370,073 


710,785 


449,334 


Royal, 


1,302,796 


586,338 






Total, 


$8,641,693 


$4,911,681 


$8,655,250 


$9,929,582 



1872. 





Assets. 


Liabilities. 


Income. 


Expenditures. 


Commercial Union, 


$515,909 


$305,643 


$444,886 


$553, S99 


Imperial, 


1,348,507 


1,070,081 


1,424,075 


1,754,186 


Lancashire, 


353,207 


250,265 


340,520 


226,138 


Liverpool, London and Globe, 


4,164,652 


2,925,271 


3,733,100 


4,484,999 


London Assurance, 


472,422 


217,512 


308,185 


1 7 " , 7 G 4 


North British and Mercantile, 


1,698,650 


1,228,757 


1,824,339 


2,022,168 


Queen, 


655,077 


301,752 


1,036,993 


1,577,442 


Royal, 


1,345,286 


1,398,781 


2,539,525 


2,375,461 


Total, 


$10,553,710 


$7,698,062 


$11,651,623 


$13,17i',057 



Such portion of the assets of these companies as are upon 
deposit in the various States or are conveyed by deeds of trust 
to Trustees in accordance with statutory requirements, for the 
general benefit of policy-holders and creditors of the companies 
in the United States, constitute the capital of the companies 
severally in the United States. 



OP CONNECTICUT. XX1U 

The following table shows the capital of the several foreign 
companies in the United States upon deposit or in the hands of 
Trustees : 

Deposited With Various States. In Hands of Trustees. Total 

Par Value. Market Value. Par Value. Market Value. Market Value. 

Commercial Union, $275,000 $313,500 $313,500 

Imperial, 573,000 559,637 $427,000 $490,100 1,049,737 

Lancashire, 200,000 229,500 229,500 

Liverp'l, London & Globe, 825,000 909,500 2,032,316 2,124,346 3,033,846 

London Assurance, 200,000 228,000 228,000 

North British & Mercantile, 620,000 662,700 5^3,000 646,320 1,309,020 

Queen, 330,000 375,800 200,000 229,250 605,050 

Royal, 595,000 672,725 596,929 596,929 1,269,654 



Total, $3,618,000 3,951,362 3,814,245 4,086,945 8,038,307 

The deposits of these companies are made with the officials of 
various States in compliance with the provisions of the laws of 
such States requiring that foreign companies shall make a de- 
posit previous to admission to transact business, and are princi- 
pally held for the general benefit of policy-holders and creditors 
in the United States, although in one or two instances the de- 
posits are held for the sole benefit of policy-holders and creditors 
within the State. These deposits, so far as the same had been 
made December 31, 1871, will be found classified in the Seventh 
Annual Report, Part 1st, page xvii. 

These deposits are all made outside of this State and under 
enactments of Legislatures having no particular interest in the 
protection of policy-holders and creditors of these companies who 
are citizens of this State 

These enactments may be so modified as to change the charac- 
ter of the Trust for which these deposits are held, or may be re- 
pealed, and the companies allowed to take possession of the 
securities on deposit and if they choose remove the same from 
this country, thereby depriving our citizens of the security which 
the law requiring deposits to be made in the United States 
intended should be afforded. 

Having in view the possibility of legislation as above indicated, 
and the evident purpose of our Statute to provide for the security 
of our citizens having business relations with these companies, by 
the hypothecation for that purpose of property within the juris- 
diction of the United States, the Commissioner soon after the 
organization of this Department informed the resident managers 



XXIV REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

of the several foreign Companies that the Companies represented 
by them were required to execute deeds of trust conveying to and 
vesting in trustees, citizens of the United States approved by the 
Insurance Commissioner, the property constituting the capital 
of such companies in the United States (whether upon deposit or 
otherwise) to be held by them for the general benefit and security 
of policy holders and creditors in the United States. In compli- 
ance with this requirement, during 1872 six of these companies, 
viz : Imperial, Lancashire, Liverpool London and Globe, North 
British and Mercantile, Queen, and Royal, executed trust deeds, 
and filed certified copies thereof with this Department. The re- 
maining two companies, viz, Commercial Union and London As- 
surance, are engaged in perfecting proper conveyances. 

The' amounts secured by these deeds and deposits constitute 
the fund upon which policy holders and creditors of these com- 
panies in the United States must rely for indemnity, being the only 
fund which is available in every contingency. 

The difficulty of determining the value of the Assets or the 
extent of the liabilities (especially the amount of reinsurance re- 
serve upon both life and fire business) of these companies, the ex- 
penses, delays, and difficulties attending litigation in a foreign 
country, and the possibility of war with its attendant disabilities, 
all combine to render the result of compulsory proceedings where 
the companies are located, by citizens of this country for the satis- 
faction of claims, at least doubtful, and justify the requirements of 
our statute in reference to deposits and trust deeds. 

These requirements should be supplemented by a provision 
limiting the extent of the liabilities these companies are permitted 
to incur, to an amount not exceeding the capital in this country 
thus secured. 

The present provisions of our Statute do not limit in any man- 
ner the extent of the liabilities of foreign companies, in this 
country, or establish any relations between such liabilities and the 
capital of such companies in this country. Any foreign company 
upon making a deposit of $200,000, may enter this State and trans- 
act business incurring liabilities far in excess of that sum, and 
when that fact is made apparent by report or otherwise, the 
Commissioner has no authority to compel the company to make 
provision for this liability or to suspend business. The Commis- 
sioner recommends the passage of an act limiting the liabilities of 



OP CONNECTICUT. XXV 

a foreign company, including its reinsurance reserve upon busi- 
ness in this country, to the amount of assets covered by trust 
deeds and deposits, and authorizing the Commissioner, whenever 
it shall appear that the liabilities exceed the assets in the United 
States of such foreign company, to call upon the company to 
make good the deficiency within a reasonable time, and upon 
the company failing so to do, to take measures to compel it to 
suspend business within the State. 

The companies that have transacted business in this country 
for a number of years have voluntarily kept the assets of their 
United States branches in excess of their outstanding liabilities, 
and when exceptional disasters have temporarily reversed this 
condition, the deficiencies have been covered by remittances from 
the home offices for the payment of losses, thus leaving the assets 
in this country substantially intact. Whether this course will 
always be pursued, and whether it will be imitated by companies 
that have recently commenced business, cannot be predicted. If it 
is adhered to, no embarrassment will be occasioned the companies 
by the passage of an act of the character recommended, while the 
commissioner will be furnished with a rule of action in case of 
necessity. The presence of this foreign capital has proved a sub- 
stantial benefit to the insuring public, the companies having 
borne a large percentage of the heavy fire losses of the past two 
years, and no restrictions should be placed upon their business, 
beyond the requirements essential to the protection of our citizens. 

CAPITAL, ASSETS, AND LIABILITIES. 

Tbe aggregate cash capital, December 31, 1872, of the seventy- 
one stock fire and fire marine insurance companies of this and 
other States represented in this Report was $26,292,010 against 
820,021,010, represented by fifty-nine companies in the last Report, 
an increase of twelve in the number of stock companies, but an 
increase of only 0271,000 in the amount of cash capital, which 
partially results from the withdrawal, from bankruptcy and other 
causes, of several companies of more than average capital, but 
principally from reductions of capital in ten instances, in amounts 
ranging from $50,000 to $1,000,000, and aggregating $2,600,- 
000. 

The gross assets of the whole number of companies (82) Ameri- 
can and Foreign, represented in the tabulations of this Report 
1 



XXVI REPORT OP INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

aggregate $70,831,292.17 against $66,423,213.27, represented by 
sixty-eight companies of the same class, December 31, 1871, an 
increase of fourteen in the number of companies, and an increase 
of $4,408,078.90 in the gross assets. The gross liabilities exclu- 
sive of capital were $39,468,425.19, and inclusive of capital $65,- 
760,435.19, leaving an aggregate net surplus of $6,017,846.86, 
and surplus as regards policy-holders of #31,429,049.58, which 
amply guarantees all outstanding risks under ordinary circum- 
stances. • 

INCOME AND EXPENDITURES. 

The aggregate premium income was $18,869,894.85 ; income 
from all other sources (except assessments on stockholders), 
$4,763,831.52; total income $53,633,726.37. The aggregate 
loss payments were $11,652,317.81 ; expenditures for all other 
purposes $15,652,511.70 ; total expenditures $57,304,829.51, an 
excess of expenditures over income of $3,671,103.14, which repre- 
sents the expense to net surplus accumulations and capital stock 
(not to speak of the loss of dividends) at which the business has 
been conducted during the year covered by this Report. 

RISKS. 

The fire risks in force at the close of the year are reported at 
$4,029,021,651, against $3,418,583,601, reported by companies 
represented in the last Report, an increase of the amount at risk 
of $610,438,050. 

The marine and inland risks in force aggregated $36,480,761.- 
15 against $41,422,102.78 reported at the close of 1871, a de- 
crease of $4,941,241.63. 

The fire risks written during 1872 are reported at $4,593,596,- 
351 against $3,486,465,743 reported for the preceding year, an 
increase of $1,107,130,608. 

In the above summaries Ihe business of the home mutuals is 
not included. The gross cash assets of these companies aggre- 
gate $620,694.39 ; premium notes and liens, in various forms, 
subject to assessment, $4,893,629. The risks written during the 
year aggregate $20,250,999. Cash premiums received thereon 
$151,078.68 ; average premium rate .74. Whole amount at risk 
as reported, $63,446,098.52. Ten of these companies report 
losses during the year aggregating $65,043.43. 



Table Showing Redaction and Assessments. 



NAME OK COM l' ANY. 



Stock Companies of Con- 
m cticut. 



LOCATION. 



jEtna, 

Connecticut, Hartford,. 

Fairfield Count] South Nonvalk,. 

Hartford Hartford 

Meriden West Meriden,.. 



Mutual Security, 

National, 

Norwalk 

Orient 

Peoples, 



Phoenix,. 



Stork Companies of other 
Slates. 



Agricultural, 
Alemannia,... 
Allemannia . 

Alps 

Amazon, 



New Haven,. 

Hartford,.. . 
Norwalk, . . . 

Hartford,.. . 
Middle town, 



Hartford,. . . 
Total, 



Watertown, N. Y. 
Cleveland, 0....... 

Pittsburg, Pa.,. . . . 

Erie, l'a., 

Cincinnati, 0.,. . . . 



American, Philadelphia, Pa.,.. 

Arctic New York, N. Y.,... 

Atlantic Brooklyn, N. Y.,. .. 

Atlantic Fire & Marine, Providence, R. I.,. . 

Bangor, .... Bangor, Me., 



Black River | Watertown, N. Y'., 

Brewers & Maltsters, New York, N. \'.,.. 

Bulfalo German : Buffalo, N Y" 

Capital City, Albany, N. Y 

Citizens,. New York, N. Y.,.. 



Albany, N. Y 

New York, N. Y.,. 
Providence R. I., 
New York, N. Y ,, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 



Commerce,... 
Continental, . 
Equitable, — 
Exchange, ... 
Fame 



Fire Association.. . 
Hermans fund,. . . 

Franklin, 

German, 

German American,. 



Germania, . . 

Girard 

Glens Kails,. 
Hanover, . . 
Hoffman,.. 



Home, 

Home, 

Howard 

Humboldt, 

Ins. Co of North America,. 



Lamar, 

Lancaster,. 
Lorillard,. . 
Manhattan,. 



New York, N. Y., 
Lancaster, Pa., . 
New York, N. Y., 
New York.N. Y.. 
Merchants, Providence, E. I. 



Philadelphia, Pa.,.. 
San Franciseo, Cal. 
Philadelphia, Pa.,. 

Erie, Pa., 

New Y'ork , N . Y. ,. . 



New York, N. Y., 
Philadelphia, Pa , 
Glens Falls, N Y. 
New York. \. Y.,. 
New York, N. Y.,. 

Nfw Y'ork, N.Y.,. 
Columbus, 0., . . . 
New York. N. Y'.,. 

Newark, N. J 

Philadelphia, Pa , 



Ca u Capital 

Jan. 1st, 
1S72. 



Hartford, $3,000,000 

a 500,000 
200,000 

1. i, ' 

6 200,000 



50,000 
500,000 

50 000 
500,000 

42,000 

600,000 



$6,642,000 



100,000 
250,000 
200,000 
250,000 
500,000 

400,000 
250,000 
200,000 

2iKi,iil It I 
200,000 

250,000 
200,000 
-m. .in in 
150,1 
300,000 

200.000 
1,000,000 
300.000 
200.010 
200,000 

500,000 
500,000 
400.000 
200,000 
1,000,000 

500,000 
300,000 
200,000 
400,000 
200,000 

2,500,000 
500,000 
500,000 
150,000 
500,000 

200,000 

"i in. ikiii 
3iiii,i 

!'.',: I, I il 111 
201 1.1 III) 



Cash Capita] 

Jan. 1st, 

1873. 



$2,000,000 

500,000 

2(111,(1(1(1 

1,000,000 

200,000 



1(1(1, I 

500,000 
50,0 

500,000 
42,000 

600,000 



$5,692,000 



200,000 
250,000 
l.yi.niiii 
200,000 
500,000 

400,000 

200, 

200,000 
200,000 
200,000 

250.000 
200,000 
200,000 
150,000 
300,000 

200,000 
1,000.000 
200,000 
200,010 
200,000 

500.000 
300,000 
400,000 
200,000 
1,000,000 

500,000 
300,000 

2i n.1,000 

250. 

200,000 

2,500,000 

250, i 

500,000 
150,000 
500,000 

200,000 

211(1,(1011 
300,000 
250,000 
200,000 



Reduc- 
tions of 
Capital. 



r$l ,000,000 



Increase of 
Capital. 



$1,000,000 



50,000 
50,000 



50,000 



100,000 



200,000 



150,000 



250,000 



50,000 



$50,000 



100,000 



Assessm 'ts 
to restore 
Capital. 



50,000 



150,000 



$200,000 



35,681 



62,500 



50,000 



400,000 
100,000 



250,000 



50,000 



70,000 



100,000 

' ioo',666 



a Paid up February 3d. b Paid up April 1st. 

c $1,000,000 new stock has been subscribed since January 1st, and is in process of collection. 



Table Showing Reduction and Assessments— Continued. 



NAME OF COMPANY. 


LOCATION. 


Cash Capital 
Jan. 1st, 

1S72. 


Cash i 
Jan. 1st 
1873. 


Reduc- 
tions of 
Capital. 


Increaae ol 

Capital. 


Assessmll 

to restore 
Capital. 




Providence, R. I.,. . . 
Philadelphia, Pa.,.. . 

New York, N. Y., 

Newport, R. I. 

New York, N.Y.,. .. 

Macon, Mo., 

Philadelphia' Pa 


§500,000 
300,000 

2(10,1100 

200,000 

1,000,000 

200,000 
400,000 
200,000 
1,000.000 
200,000 

300,000 
200,000 
500,000 
150,000 
200,000 

200,000 
500,000 
200,000 

200,ii(ill 


$250,000 

300,000 
200,000 
200,000 

500,000 

350,000 

4(J0,(i('i) 

•J :ii, i mil 

1,000,000 

200,000 

300,000 
200,000 
500.000 

150,00(1 
200,000 

200,000 
500,000 
200,000 
200,000 


§250,000 




■ 












$80,000 
52,500 




500,000 






$150,000 






Newark, N. J., 

Brooklyn, N. Y.,. ... 
Providence, R. I., 

Providence, R. I.,... . 
Springfield, Mass.,.. . 

New York, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y , 

New York, N. Y...... 

New Rochelle, N. Y., 
Williamsburg, N. Y., 

Total, 






200,000 


Providence Washington, 








Republic, 






180,000 


Spriugfield Fire & Marine, 
St. Nicholas, 






150,000 








150,000 
50,000 


Star, 










Williamsburg City, 






41,825 




$21,950,010 


$20,600,010 


11,600,000 


§250,000 


$2,122,506 




Grand total,. . 1 


$28,592,010 


$26,292,010 


2, :oo,dbo 


§300,000 


*2,322,506 



The foregoing table exhibits those companies whose conditiou 
after the Boston fire necessitated a reduction or an assessment of 
capital stock, to secure compliance with legal requirements. Ten 
companies it will be seen show reductions aggregating $2,600,000 
of which so far as the commissioner is at present advised that of 
the iEtna Insurance Company only is in process of restoration. 
Twenty companies show assessments paid up to repair capital 
ranging in amount from $535,681 to 1400,000 and aggregating 
$2,322,506 against $4,115,661 assessed by fourteen of the com°- 
panies represented in the last Eeport, to repair the breaches oc- 
casioned by the Chicago fire. Three companies have increased 
capital in amounts of $50,000 to $150,000 and aggregating 
$300,000. 



REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 



XXIX 



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OF CONNECTICUT. XXXV 

business in Connecticut. — (See Table 8.) 

The fire business transacted in Connecticut for 1872, by the 
whole number of companies reporting at this Office at the close 
of the year, may be b.iefly summarized as follows ; risks written 
during the year $153,483,553, against $145,409,895 risks written 
in 1871, an increase of $8,073,658, which would have been largely 
swelled but for the withdrawal, from bankruptcy and other 
causes so near the close of the year, of fifteen companies, repre- 
senting a large amount of risks written in Connecticut during 
the year: and which consequently have not reported to this office. 

The gross premium receipts on risks written in this State in 
1872 were $1,675,654.63 against $1,590,869.59 gross premium 
receipts on risks written in 1871, an increase for the latter year 
of $84,785.04. 

The losses incurred during the year, in Connecticut, aggregate 
$533,282.15 against $51)1,684.44 losses incurred in 1871, an in- 
crease of $31,607.71. The average ratio of premiums received to 
losses paid is 314, for 1872, against 317 average ratio for 1871, 
thus showing the aggregate results in this State for the past two 
years, for which alone statistics are available, to have been ex- 
ceedingly profitable to the companies. Of the gross amount of 
risks written, as reported, $56,813,758.77 was written by Con- 
necticut stock companies ; $20,250,999 by Connecticut mutual ; 
$56,960,155.60 by stock companies of other States ; $566,103.91 
by mutual companies of other States ; and $18,892,535.67 by 
foreign companies. The average premium rate charged by Con- 
necticut stock companies on business in this State ranges from .85 
to 1.25 ; general average 1.03. The average premium rate 
charged by stock companies of other States ranges from .64 to 
2.05 ; general average 1.18. The average premium rate charged 
by foreign companies ranges from 1.06 to 1.70 ; general average 
1.38. The average rate of each company indicates with tolerable 
certainty the character of the business and the class of risks as- 
siimed. 

The marine and inland business in this State, never lar^e, 
shows a marked falling off from the preceding year, notwith- 
standing the introduction during 1872 of a purely marine com- 
pany. Only three companies report any business of this class 
transacted in Connecticut, the risks written aggregating only $512,- 
799.76 against $2,351,624 written by four companies in 1871. 



XXXVI REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

The premium receipts were $6,065.32 against $.50,118.32 premium 
receipts for 1871. The losses incurred aggregate $3,665.41 
against $41,650.23 losses incurred the year preceding. 

The number of certificates of authorization issued to agents of 
companies of other States and foreign countries, to transact busi- 
ness in this State during 1873 is 802 : number of agents employed 
by home stock companies, 312; number employed by home mu- 
tual, 252. 

The full statements of the home mutuals are given with the 
published abstracts, and in their make up, show a marked im- 
provement in most cases on the character of returns the preced- 
ing year, though not yet sufficiently systematized to admit of sat- 
isfactory tabulation. 

STEAM BOILER INSPECTION AND INSURANCE. 

Among the comparatively recent ventures in the insurance 
line is the inspection and insurance of steam boilers against ex- 
plosion. 

In 1866 a charter was granted by the Legislature of this State 
under which the company known as "The Hartford Steam Boiler 
Inspection and Insurance Company " was organized in the same 
year ; its stockholders being mainly large manufacturers of the 
various New England States, New York and Pennsylvania. The 
object of the Company is not simply to indemnify owners of Boilers 
for loss resulting from explosions, but also the much more lauda- 
ble one of, as far as possible, "preventing those explosions alto- 
gether, by careful periodical inspections, of all boilers under the 
care of the Company, made by competent engineers, expert in 
this special business. These inspections made quarterly, and 
often cr when necessary, involve three-fourths of the Company's 
outlay, and are guaranteed by a policy of insurance covering 
within certain limits damage to boilers, buildings, and machinery. 

The first report of the Company to this department showed its 
cash capital, January 1st, 1872, to lie $100,000, which was in- 
creased during the year by the capitalization of profits to $120,- 
000, and subsequently to $187,000. It is, so far as its operations 
extend, successfully supplying a want long felt among manufac- 
turers, and is doing an important work in guarding against a 
class of casualties usually attended with more or less loss of life. 

The annual statement shows that during the past year the Com- 



OF CONNECTICUT. XXXV11 

pany's Inspectors have made 24,987 boiler inspections, in which 
12.933 defects were discovered, of which 3,015 were pronounced 
dangerous. The defects consisted of burned and blistered plates, 
inadequate bracing and staying, scale, corrosion, defective guages, 
safety valves out of order, &c, &c. 156 boilers were condemned 
as utterly unsafe and their use abandoned. 

The number of explosions during the past year, throughout the 
country, was 105, by which 223 persons were killed and 264 in- 
jured. The loss of property resulting therefrom exceeded a million 
dollars. The number of explosions of boilers under the charge 
of the Company was only 4, and these were mainly the result of 
accident or mismanagement. 

The amount of insurance outstanding, December 31, 1872, was 
$11,854,076 on 6,922 boilers. The amount paid for losses dur- 
ing the year was$18,236, for inspection expenses, &c, $60,031.66. 
The Company sustains a wide correspondence with eminent en- 
gineers in this country and in Europe in the endeavor to obtain 
all possible information on the subject of boiler explosions and the 
best means of preventing them. The business of the Company 
being peculiar it is not included in the tabulations, but its state- 
ment will be found in the published abstracts of statements of 
Connecticut Companies. 

DEPARTMENT RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

The receipts of the Department for the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1873, amounted to $26,231.61, and the expenditures for the 
same period, $17,641.53, leaving a surplus of receipts accrued to 
the State Treasury of $8,590.08. 

The receipts from the organization of the Department, Septem-. 
ber 1, 1871, to March 31, 1872 (seven months), were $18,016.- 
87, and the expenditures $14,140.73, leaving a surplus accrued 
to the Treasury for that period of $3,876.14. Total receipts 
from date of organization to March 31, 1873, $44,248.48. Total 
expenditures $31,782.26. Total surplus of receipts accrued to 
the Treasury $12,446.22. The fees collected being mainly re- 
ciprocal to laws of other States are of course variable under the 
changing legislation of the several States represented by compa- 
nies doing business in Connecticut. Measures now pending in 
several States, will, if adopted, cause a reduction of the income 
of this Department, nearer to the point where in justice to the 



XXXV1U REPORT OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER 

companies it should be, that is simply sclf-sustaning, as it cannot 
be presumed that the State desires to make the supervision of 
the business of insurance in the interest of its citizens, a source of 
revenue to its Treasury materially beyond the legitimate expenses 
of this Office. 

TAX ON PREMIUM RECEIPTS. 

By the provision of Chapter 60, Public Acts of 1868, the tax on 
premium receipts in this State, of companies of other States and 
foreign countries is collected through this Department and en- 
tirely at its expense, directly into the State Treasury, and does 
not appear in the statement of department receipts. The 
amount collected for the year ending October 1st, 1872, was $21,- 
254.21 against $13,425.08 collected for the preceding year, an 
increase of $7,829.13 and an increase of $10,385.94 over the re- 
ceipts from this source prior to the reorganization of the Depart- 
ment under the " Act of 1871.'' 

With the exception of the tax of two per cent, directly imposed 
by the laws of this State on the premium receipts of foreign com- 
panies, this tax is collectible only under reciprocal legislation, 
and except when imposed for the maintenance of Fire Depart- 
ments, is an exaction which it may be hoped will be speedily 
abolished by the States directly imposing the same. All need- 
less burdens and restrictions placed upon this great interest 
ultimately react upon the insuring public. When this fact is 
understood, there will be less difficulty in securing uniformly 
liberal insurance legislation throughout the Union. 

After nearly two years experience in administering the insur- 
ance laws of Connecticut, the Commissioner regards her legisla- 
tion, so far as it relates to the business of fire insurance, as fully 
abreast of that of any other State, for liberality and reciprocity, 
and this will be more especially felt when sister States shall have 
so far modified or abolished existing requirements as to obviate 
the necessity of enforcing the retaliatory clauses. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

GEORGE S. MILLER, 

Insurance Commissioner. 



OP CONNECTICUT. XXXIX 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the Insurance 
Department for the year ending March 31, 1873. 

RECEIPTS. 

For valuation of Life Policies, .... $9,908.93 

" Licenses, 8,944.93 

• " Filing Statements, ----- 2.385.00 

" Filing Charters, 630.00 

" Agents' Certificates, ----- 2,354.00 

« Fees for filing Certificates, &c, - - 308.25 

" Certificates valuation, &c, - - - - 1,050.00 

" Examinations, ----- 614.00 

" Blanks Sold, &c, 36 50 



Total received and paid State Treasurer, - - $26,231.61 

EXPENDITURES. 

For valuation of Life Policies, ... - $7,707.69 

" Salary of Commissioner, - - - - 3,500.00 

" Other Salaries, - - - - - - 3,750.67 

" Office Furniture arid Fixtures, ... 12.70 

" Printing and Binding, ----- 328.20 

" Traveling Expenses, ... - 365.45 

" Office Expenses (including rent), ... 1,6-16.31 

" Postage, Express, and Telegraph, - - - 229 28 

" Stationery, ------ 73.23 

" Library, ------ 28.00 



Amount drawn from Treasurer, ... - $17,641.53 

Surplus of Receipts over Expenditures, - - 8,590.08 

$26,231.61 



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S3 



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55 

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coce'ia'coco" 

v -• — — r .j; 
CC(N co_ 



li-H lO 



rJ^ODCOO lOCCCOO TP<X>0005iO tor- 



1 - — ~ 'j; i-T cccixm: 
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C£> t-H ,-,,_, 



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c: — ".-' tot* 

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Momoo 

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Ci — — 'XH »6 

coot-cr; o 
9? 92"^^^" :jf 



r-( i-h E- 



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— • X CI I - 



l-H CO OC l-H lO U? I- T 

ciococi-^ oocoe 

CC -f — 3 <-■ L.7 I - "„ 

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xhx 



: oo in : 5 >o 
i-i of 



cm r - T. Ol 

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CO l- CM CO CO 



Eifeg 



C-l '.O ca 30 -=r 
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COr-l I- OS rH 



Oii-<OSOSrH 



f -x aocco 






CN I- CM O -H 



iOH Wn 



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l-COCO 
COCOCO 










t- :ffi 




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3 




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CO 


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oo 
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rH rH 


























CO 

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CM CO i— I CO tC 


1— CO C-l >.7 — 


CNCOOM L— Ol 1-1- rH < 

<— ~ — < co ro — x co i - -i* co - o 


CO 


re . - x — ro 


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IHC- 


l-CM tH 


ce o i~«.o -r 












BC EC 

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a, °S£3 


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11,300.00 
8,337.43 

3,600.00 
32,899.99 

40,1100.00 
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5,500.00 

13,612 00 

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70,721.00 

96,359.04 

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233.088.00 

55.478.18 

35,640.00 

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99,S09.48 

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CR-*H(00 CDCOOO'O 

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FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 
COMPANIES OF THIS STATE. 



ABSTRACTS, COMPILED FROM THE ANNUAL STATEMENTS 

OF THE STOCK -FIRE AND FIRE -MARINE INSURANCE 

COMPANIES OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, 

SHOWING THEIR CONDITION ON THE 

31st DAY OF DECEMBER, 1872. 



jETNA insurance company. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 
[Organized or Incorporated, June, 1819.] 
LUCIUS J. HENDEE, President. JOTHAM GOODNOW, Secretary. 

L CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of Joint Stock or Guaranteed Capital authorized $3,000,000.00 

Whole amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 2,000,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered $405,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 93,330.00 

Interest accrued on bond and mortgage loans 1,539.49 

Value of the lands mortgaged $107,000.00 

Buildings, (insured for S60,300.00) 89,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $196,000.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company : 

' Par Market 

Value. Value. 

United States stocks, 5 -20's, 6 per cent $300,000 00 $33S,720.00 

United States currency bonds, 6 per cent 100,000.00 1 13,250.00 

Kentucky state stock, 6 per cent 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Michigan state stock, 6 per cent 25,000.00 25,000.00 

Tennessee state stock, 6 per cent 24,000.00 18,840.00 

Alabama state stock, 8 per cent 1 0,000.00 8,400.00 

South Carolina state stock, 6 per cent 20,000.00 10,000.00 

Canada Dominion stock, 6 per cent 5,070.69 

Brooklyn city water bonds, 6 per cent 25,000.00 24,000.00 

Jersey City water bonds, 6 per cent 50,000.00 47,500 00 

Hartford City bonds, 6 per cent 30,000.00 30,000.00 

Hartford city scrip, 6 per cent 6,000.00 6,000.00 

Hartford town bonds, 6 per cent 80,000.00 80,000.00 

New York city stock, 6 per cent 75,000.00 75,000.00 

Minneapolis city bonds, 10 per cent 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Chicago city bonds, 7 per cent 15,000.00 14,700.00 

West middle school district b'ds, Hartford, 7 pr. ct. 15,000.00 15,000.00 

H'fd, Prov. & Fish. R. R. mt'ge b'ds, 7 percent. 33,000.00 31,350.00 

Michigan Cent, (conv'tible) R. R. mt'ge b's, 8 p. c. 1,000.00 1,120.00 

Clevel'd, Painsville & Ash. R. R. mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. c. 100,000.00 100,000.00 



FIRE AND FIRE -MARINE INSURANCE 



Par Market 

Yalue. Value. 

Clevel'd& Toledo K.R., G. S.F. mt'ge b'ds, 7 p.c. 75,000.00 76,875.00 

Clevcl'd & Pitts'gh R. R. second mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. c. 25,000.00 25,000.00 

" " third mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. ct. 40,000.00 38,800.00 

Mich'n S. & N. Ind. R. R. gen. mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. ct. 25,000.00 25,500.00 

" " second mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. ct. 75,000.00 73,500.00 

Pitts'h, Ft. W. & Ch. R. R. 1st mt'gj b'ds, 7 p. ct. 30,000.00 31,500.00 

" " " " 2d mt'ge b'ds, 7 p. c:. 50 000.00 49,000.00 

Buffalo, N. Y. & Erie R. R. mortgage b'ds, 7 p. ct. 75,000.00 71,250.00 

New York Central R. R. mortgage bonds, 6 per ct. 75,000.00 69,750.00 

Little Miami R. R. mortgage bonds, 6 per cent. 72,000.00 64,800.00 

N. Jersey R. R. & Trans. Co. mt'ge b'ds, 6 per ct. 50,000.00 47,000.00 

Columbus & Xenia R. R. mortgage b'ds, 7 per ct. 50,000.00 48,000.00 

Cincinnati, H. & D. R. R. mortgage b'ds, 7 per ct. 50,000.00 48,000.00 

Indianapolis & Cin. R. R. mortgage b'ds, 7 per ct. 25,000.00 23,250.00 

Chicago, B. & Q.R. R. mortgage bonds, 8 per ct. 30,000,00 33,600.00 

Des- Moines Valley R. R. mortgage b'ds, 8 per ct. 4_0.000.00 36,000.00 

Lake Shore R. R. mortgage bonis, 7 per cent 10,000.00 9,300.00 

Morris & Essex R. R. mortgage bonds, 7 per cent. 25 000.00 24,250.00 

N. York, N. Haven & Hartfoi d R. R. Co. stock. . . 80,000.00 112,000.00 

Conn. River Railroad Co. stock 15,000.00 20,100.00 

Lake Shore & Mich. So. Railroad Co. stock 90,000.00 85,950.00 

Pittsburgh, Ft. W. & Chicago Railroad Co. stock. . 75,000.00 69,375.00 

Michigan Central Railroad stock 60,000.00 69,600.00 

Central Ohio Railroad Co. stock 7,200.00 4,000.00 

Morris & Essex Railroad Co. stock 50,000.00 45,000.00 

Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad Co. stock 25,000.00 17,500.00 

Joliet and Chicago Railroad Co. stock 10,000.00 9,500.00 

Albany and Susquehanna Railroad Co. stock 50,000.00 45,500.00 

Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad Co. stock 50,000.45 45,000.00 

New York Central Railroad Co. stock 60,000.00 59,400.00 

Connecticut River Company stock 5,000.00 1 ,500.00 

New Britain Nat. Bank stock, N. Britain, Conn. 10,000.00 13,500.00 

National Revere Bank stock, Boston, Mass 40,000.00 49,200.00 

First National Bank stock, Boston, Mass 10,000.00 20,000.00 

Nat. Bank of the State of Missouri stock, St. Louis, 20,000.00 1 7,600.00 

Merchants National Bank stock, St. Louis, Mo.. . 5,000.00 4,150.00 

Merchants Bank stock, St. Louis, Mo 5,000.00 1,500.00 

Mechanics Bank stock, St. Louis, Mo 20.u00.00 19,800.00 

Farmers & Mechanics Nat. B'k stock, Phil'a, Pa.. 22,000.00 29,700.00 

Hartford Nat. B'k stock, Hartford, Conn 80,000.00 128,000.00 

Farmers & Mechanics Nat. B'k stock, Hf'd, Conn. 58,000.00 78,300.00 

Phoenix Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 50,000.00 80,000.00 

State Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 25,000.00 31,250.00 

Connecticut River Banking Co. stock, Hf'd, Conn. 7,500.00 10,500.00 

iEtna Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 20,000.00 25,000.00 

American Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 10,000.00 12,600.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 20,000.00 21 ,600.00 

First National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 15,000.00 21,000.00 

Charter Oak National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn. 30,000.00 39,900.00 

National Exchange Bank stock, Hartford, Conn. 25,000.00 32,000.00 

American Exchange Nat. B'k stock, N. York City 40,000.00 44,400.00 

Nat. Butchers & Drovers Bank stock, N. York City 20,000.00 29,600.00 



COMPANIES OP CONNECTICUT. 

Par 

Value. 

Hanover National Bank stock, N. York City 10,000.00 

National City Bank stock, N. York City 10,000.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock, N. York City 50,000.00 

Nat. Bank of the Commonwealth stock, N. Y. City 10,000.00 

Importers & Traders Nat. Bank siock, N. Y. City 30,000.00 

Market National Bank stock, New York City 20,000.00 

Mechanics National Bank stock, New York City. . 30,000.00 

Merchants Exchange Nat. Bank stock, N. Y. City 10,000.00 

Metropolitan Nat. Bank stock, New York City. . . 50,000.00 

Merchants National Bank stock, New York City. . 50,000.00 

Bank of the Manhattan Co. stock, New York City 20,000.00 

Nassau Bank stock, New York City 20 000.00 

North River Bank stock, New York City 10,000.00 

Bank of New York (Nat.) stock, N. York City. . . 40,000.00 

Nat. Bank of North America stock, N. York City 20,000.00 

Nat. Bank of the Republic stock, New York City 20,000.00 

Ocean National Bank stock, New Y«rk City 20,000.00 

Peoples Bank stock, New York City 10,000.00 

Phenix National Bank stock, New York City 10,000.00 

Union National Bank stock, New York City 20,000.00 

N. York Life Ins. & Trust Co. stock, N. Y. City. . 15,000.00 

Union Trust Co. stock, New York City 10,000.00 

Total par and market value $3,337,700.00 



Loaned on Collaterals. 

Par 
Value. 

Hartford National Bank of Hartford, Conn 500 

Charter Oak National Bank of Hartford, Conn 1,200 

Mercantile National Bank of Hartford, Conn 500 

Farmers & Mechanics National Bank of Hartford, Conn 8,000 

Phoenix National Bank of Hartford, Conn 1,600 

American National Bank of Hartford, Conn 3,000 

City National Bank of Hartford, Conn 1,000 

Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn 5,000 

Hartford Carpet Company of Hartford, Conn 8,800 

Hartford City Gas Light Company of Hartford, Conn 7,075 

Hartford and New Haven Railroad Co. of Hartford, Conn 3,700 

Collins Company of Hartford, Conn 1,380 

Willimantic Linen Co. of Willimantie, Conn t2,500 

New Haven Steam Boat Co. of New Haven, Conn 1,400 

National Bank of Commerce of New York City 600 

Metropolitan National Bank of New York City 2,000 

First National Bank of Suffleld, Conn ■• • • 8,500 

Cleveland, Painesville and Ashtabula R. R Co 750 

Honsatonic R. R. Co.'s bonds 1.500 

Quincy (111) bonds 1,000 

Wabash and Western R. R. bonds 1,000 

Toledo, Wabash and Western R. R. bonds 1,000 

Springfield | 111 ) Water bonds 2,000 

Michigan Central R. R. Co. ? s bonds 1,000 

Peoria (111.) County bonds 6,000 

Peoria (111.) City bonds 2,000 

Peoria (111.) Town bonds 2,000 



Market 
Value. 

9,500.00 
25,000.00 
58,000.00 

8,800.00 
51,000.00 
25,000.00 
39,900.00 

9,000.00 
67,500.00 
58,000.00 
31,200.00 
20,400.00 

9,000.00 
53,200.00 
20,000.00 
22,400.00 

3,000.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
27,000.00 
45,000.00 
15,000.00 

$3,668,250.69 $3,668,250.69 



$4,168,170.18 



Amount 
Loaned. 

260 

600 

600 
6,460 
1,600 
3,000 

400 
5,000 
5,780 
4,600 
2,300 

380 
8,000 

260 

320 

680 
4,080 

^40 
1,400 

2,200 

300 
520 

8,160 



Total Amount, $85,005 $124,711 857,140 



57,140.00 



.6 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Cash in the Company's principal office, in currency $14,557.62 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in Bank 209,074.75 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 16,305.28 

Interest due and accrued on Collateral Loans 3,034.94 

Gross Premiums in due course of collection 928,097.73 

Aggregate amount of all the assets of the Company, stated at their actual value, $5,396,380.50 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, $286,452.79 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses, 619,787.84 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and expenses, 32,630.45 

Total gross amount of claims for Losses, $938,87 1 .08 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) running one year or 
less, $2,453,443.08 ; re-insurance thereon at fifty per cent.,. . . . $1,226,721.54 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) running more than one 
year, $1,458,442.53 ; re-insurance thereon pro rata 797,931 .38 

Gross premiums (including both cash and bills, without any de- 
duction,) on Inland Navigation risks, $35,873.44; re-insurancc 

thereon at fifty per cent 17,936.72 

• ■ 

Amount required to safely rc-insuro all outstanding risks $2,042,589.64 

Due for printing, &c 500.00 

Due and to become due for borrowed money, 401 ,672.21 

Total liabilities, except stock, scrip, reserve and net surplus, $3,383,632.93 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash, 2,000,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders, 12,747.57 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital stock, scrip, and net surplus, $5,396,380.50 
IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Inland. 

Gross premiums received in cash, $4,581,855.08 $453,380.40 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, abatement, 

and return premiums, 268,498.26 39,301.87 

Net cash actually received on premiums,.. . $4,313,356.82 $414,078.53 



$4,727,435.35 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages,. 5,173.75 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources, 298,261.85 

Income from rents, •■ 11,626.57 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash,. . . $5,042,497.52 
V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses, (including 

$1,000,421.89, occurring in previous years,)... $4,313,989.45 $253,024.44 $4,567,013.89 

Paid or allowed for Commissions or Brokerage 677,255.81 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c 359,103.01 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 97,451.90 

Interest on borrowed money, 24,405.54 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $5,725,290.15 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 

[Organized or Incorporated, June, A. D. 1850.] 
JOHN B. ELDREDGE, President. M. BENNETT, Jb., Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized S500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 



II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company : 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

United States 6's of 1881 . p $120,000.00 S139.800.00 

United States 5-20's of 1867. .. .' 30,000.00 34,350.00 

State of Connecticut honds 30,000.00 30,300.00 

City of Hartford bonds 10,000.00 9,800.00 

Cincinnati & Ind. R. R. bonds 10,000.00 9,000.00 

Chicago, Dubuque & Minn. R. R. bonds 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Bur ington & Missouri River R. R. bonds 10,000.00 10,200.00 

Chicago & Iowa R. R. bonds 20,000.00 20,000.00 

Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw R. R. bonds 40,000.00 41,600.00 

Michigan Central R. R. bonds 20,000.00 20,000.00 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. stock. . . 37,500.00 53,250.00 

Boston & Albany R. R. stock 5,000.00 7,500.00 

Hartford National Bank stock 20,500.00 32,390.00 

Farmers &, Mechanics Nat. Bank stock, Hartford. 25,000.00 33,000.00 

First National Bank stock, Hartford 20,000.00 29,200.00 

National Exchange Bank stock, Hartford 10,000.00 12,400.00 

Importers & Traders National Bank stock, N. Y. . 20,000.00 36,000.00 

JEtna National Bank stock, Hartford 10,000.00 12,500.00 

Charter Oak National Bank stock, Hartford 6,200.00 7,936.00 

Phoenix National Bank stock, Hartford 3,400.00 5,304.00 

Total par and market value $457,600.00 §554,530.00 



$554,530.00 



Loans on collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value. value, loaned. 

United States bonds t $1,000 $1,160 $600.00 

Hartford Bank stock 1,200 1,896 450.00 

Conn. Fire Ins. Co. stock 5,100 5,100 1,282.50 

Railway Passengers Insurance Co. stock, Hartford, Conn 1,300 1,300 285.00 

.fitna Insurance Co. stock, Hartford, Conn 3,200 3,840 1,500.00 

National Fire Insurance Co. stock, Hartford, Conn 4,000 3,000 1,500.00 

Conn. Western B. R. bonds 16,000 13,650 13,000.00 



8 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Hartford Fire Ins. Co. stock, Hartford, Conn 1,000 1,300 1,300.00 

New York, New Haven & Ilartford R. R. stock 5,000 7,100 3 375 00 

Hartford, Providence fc Fishkill R. R. bonds 2,000 1,880 1,200.00 

Hartford Town bond '. 1,000 1,000 442.50 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon . 839.800 S41,226 S24,935.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office $16,565.50 . 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 67,742.28 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 46,500.00 



$24,935.00 



Aggregate amount of all the Asssets of the company at their actual value. . $710,272.78 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . $50,525.00 

Total amount of unpaid lossses $50,525.00 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year 121,753.83 

He-insurance pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year . . 8,891.41 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks $130,645.24 

Due and to become due for borrowed money 25,000.00 

• _ . 

-Total amount of all liabilities, except stock and net surplus 206,170.24 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 500,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 4,102.54 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. . $710,272.78 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash premiums received $277,215.92 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 6,922.81 

Net cash received for premiums $270,293.1 1 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 49,578.76 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $31 9,87 1 .87 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $147,651.30 

Deduct salvages and re-insurances 2,151.37 

Net amount paid for fire losses $145,499.93 

Cash dividends actually paid 30,000.00 

Paid and allowed for commissions and brokerage 31,441.76 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 12,258.33 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 6,745.00 

All other payments, viz : rents, printing, advertising, etc 5,373.38 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash , $231,318.40 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



FATRFIELD COUNTY FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in South Norwalk, Conn. 

[Organized or Incorporated May, 1869.] 

WINFIELD S. HANFORD, President. HENRY R. TURNER, Secretary. 

• I. CAPITAL. 

"Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

"Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) 

Interest due on all said bond and mortgage loans, $2,313.33 ; Interest accrued 
thereon, $70.00 ; Total, 



$28,640.09 
151,395.00 

2,383.33 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



Total par and market value $23,000.00 



Market 
val ue. 



Par 

value. 

Fairfield County bonds, $20,000.00 $20,400.00 

Town of Norwalk War bonds 3,000.00 3,000.00 



$23,400.00 $23,400.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Norwalk Gas Light Co. stock 

Broadway & Seventh Avenue Railroad stock 

Manufacturers & Merchants Bank stock, N. Y 

Norwalk Lock Co. stock 

Norwalk Iron Works stock 

First National Bank of So. Norwalk stock 

Br'k'n City, Prospect Park & Hunters P't K. R. stock. 

Deposit Book Norwalk Savings Society 

New Jersey & Midland R. R. Co. stock 

Trust deed on real estate, Chicago, 111 



Par 


Market 


Amount 


value. 


value. 


loaned. 


$4,925.00 


$5,417.00 


$4,600.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


9,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,500 00 


4,500.00 


1,200.00 


2,100.00 


1,800.00 


2,00(1.00 


1,200 00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,050.00 


800.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


4,000.00 


1,661.60 


1,663.42 


1,561.60 


500.00 


500.00 


450.00 


1 522.22 


1,522/22 


1,522 22 



Total par and market value, and amount loaned. . $32,708.82 §33,952.64 $29,133.82 



Amount of all other loans made by the Company, viz : to So. Norwalk school 

committee, on promissory notes 

Cash in Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value " 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the Company 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value 



$29,133.82 



9,500.00 
1,551.57 
8,072.22 
715.00 
1,536.52 
34,421.59 
3,240.50 



$293,989.64 



10 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $33,946.50 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 35,395.00 

Gross amount of unpaid losses $09,241.50 

Deduct re-insurance and salvage claims thereon 5,141.93 

Net amount of unpaid losses $G4,099.57 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, of prem. on fire risks under one year. $64,713.07 
Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks more than one year 8,713.95 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 73,427.02 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc 250.00 

Total amount due and to become due to brokers and agents 5,805.38 

Total liabilities, except stock $143,581.97 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $343,581.97 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash premiums received $1 64.999.01 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums ". . 16,725.32 

Net cash received for premiums $148,273.69 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 9,919.14 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 3,909.31 

Income from rents 2,332.30 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $164,434.44 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid for losses $78,027.31 

Cash dividends actually paid 18,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 24,509.56 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 5,547.69 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 1 ,091 .37 

Office and agency expenses, printing, advertising, stationery, etc 11,061.71 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year $138,237^64 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT, 

On the 28th day of February, 1873. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $28,722.32 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) 164,470.00 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loam 3,852.14 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



11 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 
Value. 

Fairfield County bonds §20,000.00 

Town of Norwalk war bonds 3,000.00 

Total par and market value $23,000.00 



Market 
Value. 

$20,400.00 

3,000.00 

$23,400.00 $23,400.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value. value. loaned. 

Manufacturers and Merchants Bank stock, New York $5,000 §5,500 $4,500 

Norwalk Lock Co. stock 1,200 2,100 1,800 

Norwalk Iron Works stock 2,000 1,200 1,000 

First Nat. Bank of South Norwalk stock 1,000 1,100 1,000 

Norwalk Steam Freighting Co. stock 1,700 1,368 900 

Broadway and 7th Av. R. R. Co. stock 2,500 2,500) 

Chicago and Alton R. R. Co. stock 700 700 ) 2 ' 250 

Norwalk Iron Works stock 5,000 4,000 1 

Norwalk Steam Freighting Co. stock '. 650 520 J 3 '°° 

Norwalk Lock Co. stock 1,000 1,750 900 

National Trust Co. stock, N. York 1,000 1,000 \ 

World Mutual Life Ins. Co. stock 1,000 1,000 > 1,250 

Norwalk Steam Freighting Co. stock 650 520 ) 

Norwalk Steam Freighting Co. stock 550 440 225 

First Nat. Bmk of South Norwalk stock 1,000 1,100 . 450 

Brooklyn City, Prospect Park & H. P. R. R. Co. stock 3,000 3,000 2,000 

New Jersey & Midland R. R Co. bonds 500 500 450 

Trust deed on house and lot, Chicago, 111 1,522.22 1,522.22 1,522.22 

Paid-up policy Mutual Life Ins. Co , New York 10,500 10,500 1,800 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon . $40,472.22 $40,320.22 $23,047.22 23,047.22 

Notes South Norwalk school district 9,500.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office 3,358.42 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 16,564.52 

Net premiums in due course of collection 21,385.53 

Due from non-resident stockholders for taxes paid 589.20 

Due for rents and brokerages 428.17 

Office furniture and safe 2,000.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. . $297,317.52 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $9,662.39 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 12,322.44 

Net amount of unpaid losses $21,984.83 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 73,960.71 

Total liabilities, except stock $95,945.54 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200.U00.00 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders 1,371.98 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus $297,317.52 



12 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 

[Organized or Incorporated May, 1810.] 

GEORGE L. CHASE, President. J. D. BROWNE, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $1,000,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $448,175.60 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 457,250.00 

Interest accrued on bond and mortgage loans 1:3,067.38 

Value of lands mortgaged - $772,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $296,500.00) .'375,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises SI, 147,000. 00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value 

Hartford National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn $51,100.00 $81,760.00 

Phoenix National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 46,700.00 74,720.00 

Conn. River Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 5,000.00 6,750.00 

American National B ink stock, Hartford, Conn.. . 15,000.00 19,500.00 

Charter Oak Nat'l Bank stock, Hartford, Conn.. . 20,000.00 26,600.00 

Far. & Mcch. Nat'l Bank stock, Hartford, Conn. . 26,000.00 35,360.(1(1 

Mercantile National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn.. 15,000.00 18,750.00 

First National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 17,200.00 24,940.00 

jStna National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 31,500.00 40,635.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 20,800.00 22,256.00 

Am. Exchange Nat'l Bank stock, New York 20,000.00 22,400.00 

Nat'l Bank of Commerce stock, New York 20,000.00 23,300.00 

Imp. and Traders National Bank stock, New York 30,000.00 49,500.00 

Bank of America stock, New York 30,000.00 45,000.00 

Manhattan Co. stock, New York 10,000.00 15,200.00 

Merchants National Bank stock, New York 15,000.00 17,250.00 

Ocean National Bank stock, .New York 10,000.00 2,600.00 

Union National Bank stock, New York 10,000.00 13,300.00 

Bank of No. America stock, New York 10,000.00 10,500.00 

Metropolitan Nat'l Bank stock, New York 30,000.00 42,000.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, New York 20,000.00 22,200.00 

Black-tone National Bank stock, Boston 10,600.00 15,476.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock, Boston 4,300.00 5,375.00 

Second National Bank 9t ick, Boston 10,900.00 16,459.00 

National Hide and Leather Bank stock, Boston... 2,400.00 2,664.00 



COMPANIES OP CONNECTICUT. 13 

Atlantic National Bank stock, Boston -. 3,900.00 5,265.00 

First National Bank stock, Boston 10,000.00 18,500.00 

Boylston National Bank stock )# Boston 10,800.00 15,876.00 

Natl Bank of State of Missouri stock, St. Louis.. 20,000.00 17,200.00 

Merchants National Bank stock, St. Louis 10,000.00 8,600.00 

Merch. Nat. B'k stock, (in liquidation), St. Louis 10,000.00 3,500,00 

Union National Bank stock, Albany ' 12,500.00 15,875.00 

Montreal Bank stock, Montreal 20,000.00 40,680.00 

Ontario Bank stock, Bowmansville 10,840.00 12,004.21 

Conn. River Co. stock 12,000.00 3,000.00 

Conn. River R. R. Co. stock 2,000.00 2,800.00 

H. & N. H. R. R. Co. stock 30,000.00 43,500.00 

Hannibal & St. Joseph R. R. Co. stock 20,000.00 10,000.00 

Memphis City Bond, 6 per cent., gold 1 ,000.00 1,130.00 

Tenn. State bonds, 6 per cent., payable 1892 26,000.00 20,800.00 

Alabama State bonds, 8 per cent., payable 1886.. . 10,000.00 8,500.00 

South Carolina State Bonds 20,000.00 1 1 ,000.00 

N. Y. Cent. R. R. Bonds, 7 per cent, payable 1876 10,000.00 10,100.00 

U. S. Bonds, Registered, 6 per cent, payable 1881. 55,800.00 63,891.00 

U. S. Bonds, Registered, 6 per cent., 5-20, 1864.. . 7,000.00 8,015.00 

Total par and market value $783,340.00 $974,731.21 



$974,731.21 

Total amount of cash in office and in bank 92,387.68 

Interest due and accrued on stocks and bonds not included in market value 29,072.00 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 1 56,856.20 

State tax due from non-resident stockholders 12,790.35 

All other property belonging to" the Company, viz : drawbacks due on claims al- 
ready paid, $12,263.16; rents due and accrued, $2,735.83; due from 

other companies for re-insurance on losses already paid, $2,250.00 ; Total.. . 17,248.99 



Aggregate amount of all actual available assets $2,201,579.41 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses $301,953.25 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and expenses 11,150.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $313,103.25 

Gross premiums (without any deduction), underoncyear, $1,208,- 

025.20 ; re insurance thereon at 50 per cent $604,012.60 

Gross premiums (without any deduction), more than one year, 

$598,325.10; re-insurance thereon pro rata 316,162.55 

Amount required to safely re-insnre all outstanding risks 920,175.15 

Due and to become due for borrowed money 1 1 5,000.00 



Total liabilities, except stock $1,348,278.40 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $2,348,278.40 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $2,281,750.16 

Deduct rc-insurance, rebate, and return premium 143,443.55 



Net cash received for premiums $2,138,306.61 



14 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages ". 20,934.25 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 64,392.00 

Income received from all other sources , 5,602.06 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $2,229,234.92 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $2,233,551.94 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 311,379.11 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 11 2,229.22 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 45,692.46 

All other payments, viz : printing, advertising, traveling, etc 136,953.07 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash $2,839,805.80 



MERTDEX FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Meriden, Conn. 

[Incorporated July, 1868.] 

JEDEDIAH WILCOX, President. E. B. COWLES, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized, $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital cactually paid up in cash, 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, first liens 1 0,400.00 

258.21 

$23,100.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 9,800.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $32,900.00 

Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

U. S. bonds, 6's, reg. 1881 §5,000.00 $5,729.00 

New Haven and Northampton R. R. bonds 10,000.00 9,500.00 

Danbury and Norwalk R. R. bonds 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Connecticut Valley R. R. bonds 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, New York 3,000.00 3,330.00 

German American Bank stock, New York 2,500.00 2,575.00 

Ninth National Bank stock, New York 3,000.00 3,300.00 

Home National Bank stock, Meriden 10,700.00 12,305.00 

Meriden National Bank stock, Meriden 7,100.00 8,520.00 

First National Bank stock, Meriden 5,000.00 5,750.00 

Total par and market value $56,300.00 $61,009.00 $61,009.00 






COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



15 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 
Value. 

Meriden Britannia Company stock §2.500 

Adams Express Company stock 1,000 

-Etna Ins. Company stock, Hartford 1,400 

Home National Bank stock, Meriden 1,300 

Orient Ins. Company stock, Hartford 200 

Meriden National Bank stock 200 

Home National Bank stock 600 

Home National Bank stock 900 

Meriden National Bank stock 200 

J. Wilcox & Co. stock, Meriden 3,600 

New Britain National Bank stock 1,000 

Home National Bank stock 700 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 2,500 

Home National Bank stock 500 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 3,000 

J. Wilcox & Co. stock, Meriden 18,000 

First National Bank stock, Meriden 2,000 

Home National Bank stock, Meriden 700 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 9.900 

Home National Bank stock 1,000 

First National Bank stock 5,000 

First National Bank stock 6,500 

First National Bank stock 900 

Home National Bank stock .' 2 500 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 9,000 

Second National Bank stock, New Haven 1,700 

First National Bank stock, Meriden 1,000 

Foster, Merriam & Co. stock, Meriden 1 ,300 

Foster, Merriam & Co. stock, Meriden 2,575 

First National Bank stock, Meriden 1,800 

Meriden Cutlery Co. stock 17,400 

First National Bank stock 1,800 

American M. U. Ex. Co. stock 1,000 

Meriden Cutlery Co. stock 1,825 

American M. U. Ex. Co. stock 2,500 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 875 

J. Wilcox & Co. stock 3,600 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 9,000 

Home National Bank stock 1 ,000 

Meriden Silver Plate Co. stock 5,000 

U. S. 5-20 bonds 1.100 

Yale National bank stock, New Haven 900 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 1,0( 

Arkansas bond, Jan. 1870 1,000 

V. S. 5-20 bond, 1867 300 

Grilley Co. stock , New Haven 4,000 

Wilcox Silver Plate Co. stock 10,000 

Home National Bank stock 1,000 

Meriden Cutlery Co. stock 8,375 

Norwich and N. T. Trans. Co. stock 3,750 

Pultz & Walkley Co. stock, Southington 8,650 

Meriden Britannia Co. stock 3,000 

Eagle Lock Co. stock, Terryville, Conn 700 

G. F. Warner & Co. stock, New Haven 2,500 

Mortgage of S2,S00 assigned to Company 2,800 

Coupon mortgage note, Chicago, 111 1,000 

$177,450 



Market 


\mount 


Value. 


Loaned. 


S7.500 


$4,500 


935 


900 


2,415 


1,100 


1,495 


600 


170 


180 


240 ) 
690) 


800 


1,035 J 
240) 


1,100 


3,600 


1,800 


1,250 1 
805) 


1,700 


7,500 


1,500 


575 


450 


9,000 


2,700 


18,000 


9,000 


2,300 | 
805) 


2,700 


29,700 


9,900 


1,150 


900 


5,750 


4,500 


7,475 


4,500 


1,035 


650 


2,875 


2,500 


27,000 


9,000 


2,550 


750 


1,150 


900 


1,950 


900 


3,862 


1,800 


2,070 


1,800 


17,400 


9,000 


2,070 


1,800 


685 ) 




1,825 1 
1,712 50 j 
3,625 J 


2,250 




3,600 


1,800 


27,000 


9,000 


1,150 


900 


5,000 


2,500 


1,248 50 


1,100 


1,080 


900 


3,000 


1,000 


560 ) 
352.50 j 


800 


4,000 


1,800 


7,500 


2,700 


1,150 


900 


8,375 ) 
3,750 ) 


9,000 


8,650 


4,500 


9,000 ) 
2,800 J 


3,600 


2,500 j 
2,800 J 


3,150 


1,000 


900 


8255,955.50 $124,730 



$124,780.00 



16 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Due from non-resident stockholders for taxes paid $305.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office 261.66 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in hank 42,468.43 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 150.00 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 6,407.84 

Gross premiums in due course of collection .... 5,649.24 

Office furniture 1 ,497.61 

Gross amount of all the assets of the Company $253,136.99 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $13,906.61 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . . 7,825.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $21,731.61 

Gross premiums (without. any deduction,) running one year or 

less, $77,124.71 ; reinsurance thereon at fifty per cent $38,562.35 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) running more than one 

year, $2,559.57 ; re-insurance thereon pro rata 1,944.60 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 40,506.95 

Due for salaries, rent, advertising, and other expenses 600.00 

Brokerage and other charges 633.21 

Total liabilities, except stock $63,471.77 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $263,471.77 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $87,784.80 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 6,850.31 

Net cash actually received for premiums $80,934.49 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 430.57 

Interest and dividends received fronj all other sources 3,794.13 

Received for calls on capital $200,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $85,159.19 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $20,176.64 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 12,483.37 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 4,778.58 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 2,536.49 

Agency office, traveling, advertising, and other expenses 4,896.33 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash $44,871 .41 



1 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 17 

MUTUAL SECURITY INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New Haven, Conn 

[Incorporated, 1844.] 

CHARLES PETERSON, President. H. MASON, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized 5400,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash SI 00,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $10,000.00 

Interest accrued on bond and mortgage loans 190.66 

Value of the lands mortgaged $16,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $2,000.00) 4,500.00 

Total value $20,500.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Morris and Essex R. R. Co. stock $4,000.00 $3,600.00 

Second National Bank stock, New Haven, Conn 3,400.00 4,930.00 

Merchants National Bank stock, New Haven, Conn. 900.00 1,080.00 

National New Haven County Bank stock 3,800.00 5,320.00 

National New Haven Bank stock 7,900.00 11,318.00 

Yale National Bank stock 10,000.00 11,800.00 

N. Haven and Nortbampton conv'ble 6 per ct. bonds 15,000.00 13,875.00 

New Haven Water Co. first mortgage bonds 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Chicago and Alton R. R. 7 per cent income bonds.. 16,500.00 15,675.00 

Uuion Pacific R. R, first mortgage bonds 8,000.00 6,960.00 

U. States new issue of 1865 bonds 500.00 568.12 

U. States new issue of 1867 bonds 4,500.00 5,163.75 

S weeds Iron Co. first mortgage bonds 2,000.00 1,940.00 

West Wisconsin R. R. first mortgage bonds 3,000.00 2,700.00 

Pekin, Peoria and Jacksonville R. R. 1st mtg'd b'ds 6,000.0o' 5,400.00 

Total par and market value $95,500.00 $100,329.87 $100,32987 



Loans to six different persons on endorsed notes $9,665.57 

Cash in the Company's principal office 6,497. 9S 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 10,630.33 

Interest accrued on stock not included in " market value" 2,493.91 

Interest accrued on loans $308.13 

Net premiums in due course of collection 1 9,692.27 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine and inland risks 990.75 

All other property, viz : salvage property and claims on losses already paid, 
$3,000.00; non-resident stockholders' tax, $114.00; office furniture, $200.00. . 3,314.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets , $154,139.77 

3 



18 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses SIS. 197. 50 

Premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running one year or 

less, $24,803.40; reinsurance thereon at fifty per cent $12,401.70 

Premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running 

more than one year, $11,401.69 ; re-insurance thereon pro rata, $6,200.85 

Premiums upon all marine risks $10,260.39 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 28,862.94 

Total amount of liabilities, except capital and net surplus $42,060.44 

Joint-stOck capital actually paid up in cash 100,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 12,079.33 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including capital and net surplus $154,139.77 

IV. INCOME DUPING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash premiums received $23,492.49 $51,480.48 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 1,293.87 11,420.80 

Net cash received for premiums, (carried out,) . . . $22,198.62 $40,059.68 $62,258.30 



Notes for unpaid premiums (carried inside) $869.25 

Interest received for bonds, stocks, loans, and from all other sources 5. 41 1.62 

Received for calls on capital $50,000 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $76,669.92 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gros9 amount paid for losses $3,330.74 $33,835.51 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $37,166.25 

Cash dividends actually paid 10,000.00 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 2,702 50 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 6,604.54 



Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash S56.473.29 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



19 



NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 
[Incorporated, May, 1869.] 



MARK HOWARD, President. 



JAMES NICHOLS, Secretary. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of Joint Stock or Guaranteed Capital authorized $1,000,000.00 

Whole amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 51)0,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens,) $135,000.00 

Interest accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 366.41 

Value of the lands mortgaged $264,084.00 

Buildings, (insured for $90,067.00) 166,226.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $430,310.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Connecticut state bonds 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Hartford town bonds 10,000.00 9,700.00 

Hartford city capitol bonds 25,000.00 25,000.00 

Hartford city railroad and water bonds, 20,000.00 19,400.00 

Portland city bonds 10,000.00 9,600.00 

Hartford, Prov. & Fish. R. R. bonds 25,000.00 23,500.00 

N. York, N. Haven & Hartford R. R. Co. stock. . . 22,900.00 33,205.00 

National Mechanics Banking Asso. stock, N. York 5,000.00 5,500.00 

Metropolitan Nat. Bank stock, New York 5,000.00 7,000.00 

Central National Bank stock, New York 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Farmers & Mechanics Nat. B'k stock, Hf'd, Conu. 17,000.00 22,950.00 

Charter Oak National 3ank stock, Hartford, Conn. 10,000.00 13,300.00 

Phoenix Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 23,000.00 36,800.00 

iEtna Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 21,500.00 27,735.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 5,000.00 5,250.00 

Hartford Nat. B'k stock, Hartford, Conn 28,300.00 44,714.00 

Mercantile Nat. Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 5,000.00 6,250.00 

National Exchange Bank stock, Hartford, Conn. 9,900.00 12,672.00 

National Bank of Republic stock, Boston, Mass.. . 7,500.00 9,900.00 

Boston National Bank stock, Boston, Mass 7,000.00 8,120.00 

Merchants Nat. Bank stock, St. Louis, Mo 5,000.00 4,250.00 

Merchants Bank stock, St. Louis, Mo 875.00 875.00 

Total par and market value $277,975.00 $340,721.00 



$340,721.00 



20 FIRE AND FIRE-MAKINE INSURANCE 

Loaned on Collaterals. 

Par 

Va] ue. 

Farmers & Mechanics National Bank stock 3,200 

American National Bank stock 450 

First National Bank stock 7 000 

New Britain National Bank stock 1,500 

Rockville National Bank stock 8,000 

National Union Bank stock 6,000 

U. S. Trust Company stock 4,000 

Thompsonville Trust Company stock 2,500 

Hartford Trust Company stock 2,000 

Hartford Carpet Company stock 500 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. stock 6,800 

Rockville R. R. preferred stock 2,500 

. Adams Express Company stock 500 

United States bonds 2,700 

New Haven City bonds 2,000 

Hartford Town bonds 1,000 

Haddam Town bonds , 2,000 

Indianapolis and Madison R. R. Bonds 1 ,000 

Hartford, Providence & Fishkill R. R. bonds 2,000 

Cleveland and Pittsburg R. R. bonds 3,000 

New Haven and Northampton R. R. bonds 5,000 

Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw R. R. bonds 2,000 

Indiana Central R. R. bonds 500 

Milwaukee and St. Paul R. R. bonds 2,000 

Toledo, Wabash and Western R. R. bonds 3,000 

Hartford, Providence and Fishkill R. R. bonds 1,000 

Indianapolis and Cincinnati R. R. bonds 6,000 

Pittsfleld Bank and deposits in saviDgs banks 562 

Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . . . $77,712 $85,018 853,590 58,890.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office, $859.46 ; iu hands of Agents, $35,000.00 $35,859.46 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in Bank 168,482.14 

Interest due and accrued on bonds not included in " market value" 3,125.00 

Interest due and accrued on Collateral Loans 1,422.07 

Aggregate amount of all the assets of the Company, stated at their actual value, $742, 1 66.08 



Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Loaned. 


4,320 \ 




567 \ 


S8.900 


9,800 ) 




1,650 


1,200 


8,916 


2,100 


5,000 


2.700 


4,000 


1,050 


2,500 


300 


2,200 


600 


1,220 


920 


9,860 ) 
2,500) 


8,600 


470 


450 


3,088 


2,050 


1,940 


1,500 


1,000 j 
1,900 ) 


2,400 


900 


750 


1,880 1 
2,626) 




4,100 


4,750 


4,180 


1,820 


900 


600] 
1,880 J 






2,760 \ 


10,700 


910 1 
5,400 J 






602 


690 


$85,018 


853,590 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, ' $27,539.67 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses, 42,044.96 

Total amount of claims for Losses, $69,584.63 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running 

one year or loss, $265,640.66 ; rc-insurance thereon at fifty per 

cent $132,820.33 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) on all fire risks running 

more than one year, $38,441.20; re-insurance thereon pro rata,. . . 30,281.34 

Amount required to safely re-insuro all outstanding risks $163,101.67 

Total liabilities except stock and net surplus, $232,686.30 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash, 500,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders, 9,479.78 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital stock, scrip, and net surplus, $742,160.08 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 21 
IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. 

Gros9 premiums received in cash, $353,000.04 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, abatement, and return premiums, 20,761.53 

Net cash actually received for premiums, 8332,298.51 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages, 1,942.84 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 32,584.58 

'Premium ou coin, 68.81 

Received for calls on capital 8150,000.00 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash, . . . $366,894.74 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses, 8174,509.34 

Cash dividends actually paid , 20,000.00 

Paid and allowed for commissions and brokerage'. 49,518.45 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 23,281.75 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes .'. 2,593.68 

All other payments, viz : rents, printing, advertising, etc 25,387.42 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash 8300,290.64 



NORWALK FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Norwalk, Conn. 

[Organized or Incorporated, May, I860.] 

WDLLIAM C STREET, President. GEORGE R. COWLES, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 50,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage $1,800.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company : 

Par 

Value. 

U. S. registered 1865 bonds $20,000.00 $22,750 



Par Market 

Value. Value. 



Total par and market value 22,750.00 



22 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Norwalk Mills stock 

Danbury National Bank stock 

Norwalk Iron Works stock 

National Bank of Norwalk stock 

Danbury and Norwalk R. R. stock 

Danbury and Norwalk R. R. bonds 

National Bank of Norwalk stock 

Danbury and Norwalk R. R. stock 

Dnion Manufacturing Co. stock 

National Bank of Norwalk 

Norwalk Gas Light Co. stock 2,500 

Cincinnati, Sandusky and Cleveland R. R. bonds 

Stamford National Bank stock 



Par 


Market 


Amount 


yalue, 


value. 


loaned. 


8450 


S360 


8300 


300 


375 


300 


8,000 


1,500 


1,500 


300 


315 


300 


250 


250 


150 


3,000 


8,000 


2,400 


900 


945 


760 


200 


200 


160 


750 


8.000 


2,400 


200 


210 


150 


2,500 


2,750 


1,500 


500 


500 1 


600 


360 


600) 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon $12,710 $14,005 $10,600 



All other loans 

Cash in the Company's principal office , 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in "market value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . 



810,600.00 

32,850.00 
1,345.98 
3,662.77 
1,456.70 
5,169.50 
1,393.64 

$80,928.59 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses against the Company, adjusted and unpaid 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 

Total amount of unpaid lossses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . , 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks.. . . 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock and net surplus. 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 



$2,076.08 
1,570.96 



#7,504. 88 
4,667.46 



$3,647.04 



$12,171.54 

$15,818.58 
50,000.00 
15,110.01 



Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. . $80,928.59 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash premiums received $15,859.05 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 1,823.60 

Net cash received for premiums $14,035.45 

Interest and dividends received on bonds and mortgages and from other sources. 4,588.33 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $18,623.78 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $6,599.26 

Deduct salvages and re-insurances 1,136.58 

Net amount paid for fire losses $5,462.68 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 23 

Cash dividends actually paid 5,000.00 

Paid or allowed for Commissions or Brokerage, 2,234.98 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c, 1,625.00 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 29.24 

Interest on borrowed money, stamps, rent, and office expenses 855.87 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $15,207.77 



ORIENT FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 

[Incorporated, May, 1867.] 

CHARLES T. WEBSTER, President. GEORGE W. LESTER, Secretary, 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of Joint Stock or guaranteed capital authorized $2,000,000.00 

Amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage $157,955 90 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 5,112.68 

Value of mortgaged premises, (insured for $129,400.00) $405,240.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market. 

Value. Value. 

American National Bank stock, Hartford $10,000.00 $12,200.00 

iEtna National Bank stock, Hartford 10,000.00 12,400.00 

Charter Oak National Bank stock, Hartford 10,000.00 12,800.00 

Farmers & Mechanics Nat. Bank stock, Hartford. 10,000.00 13,000.00 

Hartford National Bank stock 15,000.00 24,000.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford 3,500.00 3,745.00 

Mercantile National Bank stock, Hartford 10,000.00 12,000.00 

Phoenix National Bank stock, Hartford 5,000.00 7,750.00 

First National Bank stock, Hartford 4,800.00 6,912.00 

National Exchange Bank stock, Hartford 800.00 976.00 

Metropolitan National Bank stock, New York 10,000.00 13,500.00 

Michigan Central R. R. Co. stock 22,800.00 26,904.00 

Lake Shore & Mich. So. Railroad Co. stock 20,000.00 19,200.00 

Albany and Susquehanna Railroad Co. stock 10,000.00 9,200.00 

Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad Co. stock 20,000.00 18,000.00 

New York, N. Haven & Hartford.R. R. Co. stock.. 27,700.00 38,780.00 

Indiana Central R. R. Co. 10 per ceut. bonds 10,000.00 11,000.00 

Indiana & Cincinnati R. R. Co. 7 per cent, bonds. 11,000.00 10,230.00 

Hartford, Prov. & Fish. R. R Co. 7 per ct. bonds. 20,000.00 19,000.00 

W. J. Finlay, Toledo, 10 per cent, bonds 20,000.00 21,000.00 

Total par and market value $250,600.00 $292,597.00 $292,597.00 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Lnans on collateral's. 

Par 
value. 

£itna Insurance Co. stock, Hartford, Conn $2 500 

|| " 1,200 

800 

1.300 

Phoenix Insurance Co. stock, Hartford 4 000 

.ffitna Life Insurance Co. stock, Hartford 800 

1,000 

" 1,000 

Continental Life Ins. Co. 6tock, Hartford 1 250 

" 375 

Conn. General Life Ins. Co. stock, Hartford 2 500 

" 1,500 

_ „ " " 5,000 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. Co. stock 3 000 

|| " " " 700 

" " 2,500 

Mtna, National Bank stock, Hartford 500 

Charter Oak National Bank stock, Hartford 1 000 

Mercantile National Bank stock, Hartford g000 

„" " " 2',900 

Central National Bank stock, New York 700 

First National Bank stock, Rockville, Conn 300 

" 300 

" * ( *t *l It tl 

400 

American National Bank stock, Hartford 4 000 

" " 1,250 

Farmers and Mechanics National Bank stock, Hartford 1,000 

Rockville National Bank stock, Rockville, Conn 600 

National Bank of Commerce stock, Chicago, 111 2 500 

American National Bank stock, Hartford 75O 

Charter Oak " " " " i-qq 

First " " " " ".'!"!""!.'! 300 

.Stna Insurance Co. stock, Hartford 200 

Trust deed, bond, C. E. Bosworth, Champaign, 111 1 600 

B. J. Gifford, Champaign, 111 2,000 

V7. W. Snyder, Champaign, 111 2,000 

W. Hill, Bloomington, III 3 000 

J. C. & 6. E. Geisendorf, Indi'apolis. Ind. 1,000 

J. A. Heidlenger, Indianapolis, Ind 3,000 

Ewing & Smith, Fort Wayne, Ind 1,000 

H. Burgess, Fort Wayne, Ind 1,000 

. ,: Shaw, Lippincott & Conner, Ind'apolis, Tnd. 2,000 

Onited States bonds, 5-20s, 1867 1 000 

" J 865 500 

" *867 150 

United States Watch Co. bonds, New Jersey 2 000 

W. U. Telegraph Co { m 

City of Hartford bonds 2 000 

South Side R. R. Co., Va., 8 per cent, bonds. .... ,., 20^000 

Hartford, Providence & FishkiU R R. Co. bonds 4,000 

" " " 1,000 

National Si rew Co. stock, Hartford. . 9 000 

|| " 4,000 

" 800 

_,„ " 2,500 

Willimantic Linen Co. stock, Hartford 1250 

„ " " l',250 

National Screw Co. stock, Hartford 2 500 

Willimantic Linen Co. etock, Hartford 7,800 

Weed Sewing Machine Co. stock, Hartford ljoOO 



Market 


Amount 


value- 


loaned. 


$3,000 


81,200 


1,440 


1,200 


960 


600 


1,560 


1,200 


4,800 


1,100 


2,400 


1,200 


3,000 


1,000 


3,000 


1,200 


1,100 


600 


330 


300 


2,100 


1,800 


1,260 


1,000 


4,200 
4,200 


; 6,000 


980 


600 


3,500 


600 


620 


300 


1,280 


540 


3,600 


3,000 


3,480 


1,500 


658 


644 


360 


120 


360 


180 


480 


860 


4,880 


3,900 


1,525 


1,200 


1,300 


190 


600 


420 


2,750 


1.800 


915 1 




640 




432 


3,480 


240 




1,600 J 




2,000 


1,200 


2,000 


1,200 


3,000 


1,800 


1,000 


900 


3,000 


3,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


600 


2,000 


1,800 


1,170 , 
580! 


1,500 


175.5 


150 


2,000 
1,440 


981.9 


1,940 


1,800 


18,000 


15,000 


3,7C0 


3,000 


940 


600 


22,500 


6,000 


1Q.00O 


3,000 


2,000 


900 


6,250 1 
2,050 ) 


3,000 


2,050 j 
6,250) 


8,000 


12,792 


6,000 


1,800 


1,600 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



25 



Weed Sewing Machine Company, Hartford 3,500 

" 1,175 

" 1,175 

1,600 

1,700 

4,610 



Hartford Carpet Co. stock, Hartford, 

Collins Company stock, Hartford 

Shailer & Hall Quarry Co. stock, Portland, Conn 1,500 

" " " " '• " 700 

Adams Express Company stock 10,000 

" " " " 2,500 

State Bank stock, Hartford 1,000 

U. S. Trust Company stock, N. T 1,500 



Fireman's Trust Ins. Co. stock, Brooklyn. 
National Insurance Co. stock, Hartford. . . 
Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw R. R. Co. bond. 

National Insurance Co. stock, Hartford. . 



600 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 



6,300 
2,115 
2,115 
2,880 
4,165 
3,688 
4,500 
2,100 
9,300 
2 325 
1,150 ! 
3,000 
625 
1,050 j 
940{ 
940 / 
1,050 ) 



6,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,100 
3,000 
3,000 
8,000 
1,200 
6,000 

3,000 

1,200 
600 

1,500 
1,500 



Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon §164,935 $222,490.50 $130,365.95 $130,365.95 



Cash balances due from agents 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Office furniture, fixtures, and safe 



$5,817.78 
755.42 

29,973.18 
1,500.00 
3,941.69 

75,000.00 
2,500.00 



Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. . §705,519.60 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Net amount of unpaid losses $51,958.41 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running 

one year or less, $255,062.57 ; re-insurance thereon at 50 per cent.. $127,531.28 
Gross premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running 

more than one year, $26,504.12 ; re-insurance thereon pro rata 1 7,877.58 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 145,408.86 

Due for salaries, rent, advertising, agency, and other expenses 2,000.00 

Due and to become due for borrowed money,. . 60,000.00 

Brokerage and other charges due and to become due 13,125.00 

Total liabilities, except stock $272,492.27 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash : 500,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $772,492.27 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $334,125.26 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 19,733.99 

Net cash actually received for premiums $314,391 .27 

Interest received on bonds and mortgages, dividends on stocks, and other sources. 31,613.93 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $346,005.20 

4 



26 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses .' $196,573.68 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 47,362.39 

Paid for salaried and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 23,804.61 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 7,924.59 

General expense account, and agency expenses 35,1 S3. 28 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $310,848 55 



PHCENIX FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 

[Organized or Incorporated May, 1854.] 

H. KELLOGG, President. D. W. C. SKILTON, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $2,100,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 600,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $79,012.46 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 19,386.00 

Interest accrued on bond and mortgage loans 330.40 

Value of lands mortgaged $20,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $9,000.00) 15,500.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises *35,500.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value 

Hartford National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn $100,000.00 $160,000.00 

Far. & Mech. Nat'l Bank stock, Hartford, Conn. . 50,000.00 68,000.00 

Mercantile National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn.. 50,000.00 62,500.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 20,000.00 21 ,400.00 

iEtna National Bank Mock, Hartford, Conn 20,000.00 25,800.00 

Phoenix National Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 30,000.00 48,000.00 

State Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 15,000.00 18,750.00 

Conn. River Bank stock, Hartford, Conn 5,000.00 6,750.00 

American National B ink stock, Hartford, Conn. . . 25,000.00 32,500.00 

Hartford Trust Company stock, Hartford, Conn. . 25,000.00 30,000.00 

Metropolitan Nat'l Bank stock, New York 10,000.00 14,000.00 

Merchants Exchange Nat, Bank stock, N.York.. 10,000.00 9,000.00 



COMPANIES OF CONNECTICUT. 



27 



Manufacturers. and Merchants B'k stock, N. Y. . . 10,000.00 

New Britain Nat. Bank stock, N. Britain, Conn. 15,000.00 

Waterbury Nat. Bank stock, Waterbury, Conn... . 10,700.00 

Niagara District Bank stock. Canada 5,000.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, Chicago, 111 10,000.00 

Holyokc Water Power Co. stock 10,000.00 

New York, N H. & II. B. R Co. stock 40,000.00 

U. S. 6'sof 18S1, 6 percent, bonds 85,500.00 

U. S. 5-20's, 6 per cent, bonds 26,000.00 

Tennessee State 6 per cent, bonds 20,000.00 

Alabama State 8 per cent, bonds 50,000.00 

South Carolina -old reg. stock" 6 per cent, bonds. 25,003.70 

Hartford City 6 per cent, bonds 10,000 00 

New Britain water 7 per cent, bonds 10,000.00 

Minneapolis water 10 per cent, bonds 5,000 00 

Detroit City 7 per cent, bonds 50,000.00 

Cincinnati City 7 3-10 percent bonds 50,000 00 

San Francisco 7 per cent, bonds 48,500 00 

Hamilton County, Ind., 10 per cent, bonds 40,000.00 

Indianapolis & Cincinnati R. R. 7 per cent, bonds. 57,000.00 

Conn. Western R. R. 7 per cent, bonds 30 ,000.0 

Total market value 



10,400.00 
20,250.00 
16,050.00 
5,150.00 
11,500.00 
22,500.00 
58,000.00 
100,462.50 
29,380.00 
16,000 00 
42,500.00 
13,752.03 
10,200.00 
10,350.00 
5,200.00 
51,500.00 
51,750.00 
49.470.00 
41,600.00 
53,010.00 
27,900.00 

$1,143,624.53 $1,143,624.53 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 

value. 



Market 
value. 



Southern Minn. R.R. Co. bonds, 50,000 35,000 



Amount 
loaned. 
35,000 



$35,000.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans and bank deposits 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Aggregate assets stated at their actual value $1^582,646.55 



7,159.17 
100,033.28 

1,912.00 
196,188.71 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses .... $177,520. /3 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses. . . . 8,200.00 

' P ., , .. $185,720.73 

N t amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, of prem. on fire risks under one year. $542,783.00 

Re-insurance pro rata, on tire risks more than one year 242,122.23 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 784,905.23 

Due and to become due for borrowed money ' 

... i . $1,070,625.96 

Total liab.Ut.es except stock. . . ' CO o 000.00 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash ; 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $1,670,625.96 



28 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE* INSURANCE 

4 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR 

Gross cash premiums received 81,626,522.45 

Deduct re insurance, rebate, and return premiums 101.340.8S 

Net cash received for premiums 51 ,525, ! 81.57 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 5,599.04 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 83,045.94 

Income from rents . . 890.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash SI, 6 14, 7 16. 55 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid for losses 3 1,407,848.05 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 227,818.45 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 56,179.37 

Amount paid for state, and local taxes 45,255.93 

All other payments and expenditures 127,121.62 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year SI ,864,223.42 



PEOPLE'S FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located ih Middletown, Cosn. 

[Organized or Incorporated May, 1859.] 

JESSE G. BALDWIN, President. BETH H. BUTLER, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 42,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 



S23.000.00 
40,000.00 



United States 6 per cent, currency bonds $20,000.00 

Middletown Town 7 per cent, bonds 40,000.00 

New Haven, Middletown & Wil. R. R. 7 per ct. b'ds. 15,000.00 12,000.00 

Cash in Middletown Savings Bank 23,200.00 23,200 00 

Cash in Farmers & Mechanics Bank 14,920.00 14,920.00 

Total par and market value SI 13,120.00 $113,120.00 SI 13,120.00 

Cash in Company's principal office 1 ,360.00 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 9,289.69 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 178.55 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value SI 23,948.24 



COMPANIES OP CONNECTICUT. 29 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid $1,250.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses and 
losses resisted, interest, costs, and expenses thereon 9,250.00 



Gross amount of unpaid losses $10,500.00 

Deduct re-insurance and salvage claims thereon. 5,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $5,000.00 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent $17,768.80 

Re-insurance pro rata 6,562.34 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 24,331.14 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc 500.00 



Total liabilities, except stock $29,831.14 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 42,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 52,117.00 



Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $123,948.24 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $46,319.55 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 2,652.07 

Net cash actually received for premiums. ... $43,667.48 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages, and premium on bonds sold 11,981.76 

Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $55,649.24 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR, 

Gross amount paid for losses $24,540.74 

Cash dividends actually paid 4,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 6,302.98 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 3,025.00 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 1,183.34 



Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash $39,052.06 



30 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

HARTFORD STEAM BOILER INSPECTION AND 
INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Hartford, Conn. 
[Incorporated June, 1866.] 
J. M. ALLEN, President. THEO. H. BABCOCK, Secretary. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized, $1,000,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $120,000.00 

Paid in stock notes, (endorsed) 380,000.00 500,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) $33,800.00 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loans 796.33 

Total value of mortgaged premises $171,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

Conn. State 6 per cent bonds $100,000.00 $100,000.00 

Dayton & Western R. R. bonds 15,000.00 11,550.00 

Urbana, 111., Township bonds 4,000.00 4,000.00 

City National Bank stock, Hartford 2,400.00 2,520.00 



Total par and market value $121,400.00 $118,070.00 $118,070.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 441.65 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 3,804.55 

Cash in hands of agents and in course of transmission 9,480.04 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 3,190.00 

Endorsed stock notes held by Company, payable 30 days after notice, $380,000.00 

Premiums in due course of collection 2,015.57 

Furniture and inspection apparatus, test pumps, gauges, &c 2,400.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value.. $173,998.14 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $549.48 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 100.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $649.48 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 25,138.61 



Total liabilities, except stock $25,788.09 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 120,000.00 

Capital paid in stock notes : $380,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders 28,210.05 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $173,998.14 



COMPANIES OP CONNECTICUT. 



31 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $105,225.59 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiifm 4,767.81 

Net cash received for premiums $100,457.78 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 2,405.97 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 7,560.71 

Received from the assured for inspection of steam boilers 45,096.68 

Received for increased cash capital $20,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $155,521.14 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $18,236.50 

Dividends actually paid 31,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 34,804.81 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 8,095.80 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 2,707.12 

All other payments, viz : inspection expenses, office expenses, advertising, etc... 60,031.66 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash $154,875.89 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 
COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



ABSTRACTS, COMPILED FROM THE ANNUAL STATEMENTS 
OF THE STOCK -FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 
COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES, AUTHORIZED 
TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF CON- 
NECTICUT, SHOWING THEIR CON- 
DITION ON THE 31st DAY 
OF DECEMBER, 1872. 



AGRICULTURAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Locatkd in Watektown, N. Y. 

[Incorporated, January, 1863.] 

JOHN C. COOPER, President. ISAAC MUNSON, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. W. HANOVER, Willimantic. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized. $200,000.00 

AVhole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $31,460.28 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $268,853.05 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 9,266.44 

Value of the lands mortgaged $820,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $38,100.00) 307,425.00 

Total value $1 ,1 27,425.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



Par Market 

Value. Value. 



U. S. Registered bonds $85,500.00 $97,470.00 

Dominion, Canada, stock 14,500.00 16,121.25 

County and Town bonds 30,200.00 30,200.00 

R. W. & O. R. R. bonds 200.00 200.00 



Total par and market valne $130,400.00 $143,991.25 $143,991.25 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

Value. Value. Loaned. 

Watertown Fire Ins. Co. stock $35,500.00 $53,250.00 S27,94G 11 



Total par aud market value and amount loaned $27,946.11 



36 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Bills receivable secured by agents and personal bonds $26,508.44 

Cash in the Company's principal office $43,264.21 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 58,869.21 

Interest accrued on stock not included in " market value" 2,51 1.13 

Interest due and accrued on loans 3,467.59 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 98,644.60 

All other property belonging to the Company 31 5.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets $688,58*.87 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses $3,098.85 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses thereon. 3,200.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $6,298.85 

Re-insurance upon fire risks running one year or less at 50 per cent. $87,746.48 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . . 203,717.78 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $291,464.26 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 54.00 

Total amount of liabilities, except capital $297,817.11 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 190,771.76 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including capital and net surplus $688,588.87 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $543,438.10 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 21,510.23 

Net cash received for premiums $521,927.87 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 17,827.75 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, and from all other sources. 11,180.97 

Income from all other sources 1,611 78 

Assets capitalized under Act of April 28, 1870 $100,000.00 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $552,548.37 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $299,445.64 

Deduct salvages and re-insurances 5,541.66 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $293,903.98 

Cash dividends actually paid 40,000.00 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 59,764.88 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 28,554.00 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 6,512.42 

All other payments and expenditures, viz : stationery, priming, &c 20,372.14 



Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $449,107.42 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 37 

ALEMANNIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Cleveland, Ohio. 
[Incorporated, March, 1870.] 
WILLIAM MEYER, President. ISIDORE WOLF, Assis't Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. B. BOWERS, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of Joint Stock or Guaranteed Capital authorized §250,000.00 

Whole amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens,) $36,970.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage upon which more than one year's interest is due. . . 198,225.00 

Interest accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 36,369.56 

Value of the lands mortgaged $1,010,700.00 

Value of buildings, (insured for §118,600.00) 177,500.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises 81.1 8S,2<)0.l)O 

All loans 6,322.75 

Cash in the Company's principal office 999.68 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in hank 53,060.89 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 70,622.99 

All other property belonging to the Company 25.00 

Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value S402.595.87 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid SI 8,549.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses, 10,500.00 

Gross amount of claims for losses S29.049.0O 

Deduct re-insurance and salvage claims 11,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses SI 7,549.00 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running 

one year or less, 8169,421.00 ; re-insurance thereon at 50 per cent. SS4.710.75 
Gross premiums (without any deduction,) on all fire risks running 

more than one year, §29,975.00 ; re-insurance thereon pro rata,. . . 12,225.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks §96,935.75 

Due for salaries, rent, advertising, and other expenses 136.30 

All other demands against the Company 16,005.40 

Total liabilities except stock 5130,626.45 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders 21,969.42 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus S402.595.87 



38 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash i $340,481.57 

Deduct re-insurancc, rebate, abatement, and return premiums, 85,010.89 

Net cash actually received for premiums, $255,470.68 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages, 7,050.77 

Income received from all other sources 49,477.47 

Received for calls on capital $35,681 .00 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash,. . . $311,998.92 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses, $198,082.20 

Paid and allowed for commissions and brokerage 62,746.13 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 5,086.04 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 5,803.55 

All other payments and expenditures 53,992.58 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $325,710.50 



ALLEMANNIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Pittsburgh, Penn. 
[Organized or Incorporated, April, 1868.] 
ROBERT C. SCHMEIITZ, President. CHARLES F. HERROSEE, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 150,000.00 

Amount paid in notes or other obligations 50,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond aud mortgage $176,275.44 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 3,407.24 

Value of buildings mortgaged $517,500.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company : 

l'ar Market 

Value. Value. 

Bast Birmingham Borough bonds $135.00 $135.00 

Total par and market value . 135.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office '. 504.68 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 27,217.20 



COMPANIES OF OTHEK STATES. 39 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 20,149.53 

Bills receivable, not matured $16,190.81 

Bills receivable other than those taken for premiums 30.00 

Deposits in savings banks 10,000.00 

Notes or other obligations given for capital $50,000.00 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . . $237,779.09 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses against the Company, adjusted and unpaid $1,730.32 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $40,231.68 

Re-insurance pro rata, on firo risks running more than one year. . . . 17,989.85 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks - $58,221.53 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $59,951.85 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 150,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 27,827.24 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. . $237,779.09 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash premiums received $96,025.93 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 7,579.61 

Net cash received for premiums $88,446.32 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 17,393.54 

Received for calls on capital, $50,000 ; increased capital, $50,000. . $100,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $105,839.86 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid for fire losses $28,614.63 

Cash dividends actually paid 10,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 13,269.81 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c, 5,638.24 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 1,435.97 

All other payments and expenditures 6,832.15 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $65,790.80 



40 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



ALPS FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Located in Erie, Penn. 

[Incorporated, December, 1870.] 
ORANGE NOBLE, President. THOMAS F. GOODRICH, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, J. W. SMITH, Waterbury. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of Joint Stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage $106,000.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 6,360.00 

Loans on collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value, value loaned. 

Second National Bank of Erie stock $45,000 $49,500 $48,000 

Keystone National Bank of Erie stock 9,000 10,800 10,000 

First National Bank of Erie stock 3,500 4,200 2,500 

Citizens Bank of TitusTille stock 5,000 5,750 5,000 

Mercer Mining and Manufacturing Co. stock - 1,500 1,500 1,500 

" " " " 4,250 4.250 3,500 

Erie & IMttsburg It. R. stock 4,500 4,500 2,000 

Shenango & Allegheny It. R. stock '. 2,400 2,400 1,400 

'< " " bonds 4,000 3,400 2,000 

" " " bonds 0,000 5,100 5,000 

" " " bonds 1,000 850 600 

" " " bonds 5,000 4,250 4,000 

Mercer Mining and Manufacturing Co. bonds 12,000 10,200 10,000 

" " " bonds 4,000 3,400 3,500 

Erie City bonds 5,000 5,000 6,000 

Erie City bonds ..... 20,000 20,000 20,000 

Erie City bonds 20,000 20,000 20,000 



Total par and market value, and amount loaned.. $152,150 $155,100 $144,000 



$144,000.00 



Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 44,307.75 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 8,640.00 

Net premiums in due course of collection 56,206.17 

Bills receivable not matured, taken for fire and marine risks 3,046.72 

All other property belonging to the Company 7,210.68 

Due from other companies for re-insurance 2,7 79.92 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. . $378,551 .24 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 41 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Net amount of unpaid losses $54,267.41 

Gross premiums (without any deduction,) upon all fire risks running; 

one year or less. $l\VJ,.310.46 ; re-insurance thereon at 50 per cent.. §129,655 23 
Gross premiums (without any deduction.) upon all fire risks running 

more than one year, S9, 710.00 ; reinsurance thereon pro rata 9,710.00 

Gross premiums upon all unexpired marine risks 2,S56.68 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 142,221.91 

Total liabilities, except stock S196.489.32 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $396,489.32 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 

Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums S302.016.28 S32.963.01 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 32,995.82 20,905.08 

Net cash received for premiums §269,020.46 $12,057.93 8281,078.39 



Bills and notes received for premiums unpaid §1,700.00 

Interest received on bonds and mortgages 6,360.00 

Interest and dividends received on bonds and mortgages and from other sources. 8,640.00 

Income received from all other sources 5,089.36 



Aggregate Income received during the year in cash S301 



167.75 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses S126.382.68 S12.500.03 $141,808.72 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 62,679.18- 

Paid for salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 15,728.01 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 6,012.35 

All other payments and expenditures 19,619.81 

A^regate Expenditures during the year in cash §245,848.07 



42 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



AMAZON FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Located in Cincinnati, Ohio. 
[Organized or Incorporated October, 1871.] 

GAZZAM GANO, President. B. D. WEST, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, EALPH GILLETT, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $619,572.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 28,4 

Value of lands mortgaged $930,383 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $257,069) 786,017 

Total value of mortgaged premises #1,716,400 



Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 

value. 

United States 10-40 bonds $35,000.00 

" " " " 70,000.00 

" " " " 1,000.00' 

" " " " 900.00 

United States 5-20 bonds 12,000.00 

" " " " 3,00000 

" " " " 55,000.00 

" " " " 500.00 

Alabama State bonds 10,000.00 

Mississippi State warrants 15,000.00 

Cincinnati, Rockport & S. W. R. R. stock 500.00 

Triumph Insurance Co. stock 1 7,500.00 

Westwood School (Hamilton, O.) bonds 12,100.00 

Union Couniy, Ohio, bonds 4,01)0.00 

Total par and market value $236,500.00 



Market 
value. 



$117,337.50 

2,132.75 

17,587.50 

64,518.75 
6,822.75 

11,432.12 

500.00 

11,980.00 

12,100.00 

4,000.00 



J248.411.37 $248,411.37 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



43 



Loam on Collaterals. 



Par Amount 

value. loaned. 



1,050 
5,000 



Andes Insurance Company stock $1,000 ) 

Triumph Insurance Company stock 580 1 

United States 5-20 bonds 500 I 

Triumph Ins. Company stock 500 ' 

Triumph Ins. Company sto?k 5,000 ) 

Pomeroy Iron Compauy stock 3,000 ' 

Triumph Ins. Company stock 1,500 950 

Hall's Safe and Lock Company stock 30,000 25,000 

Bottomry bond, str. " Shannon'' 2,500 2,500 

Cin. Gas Light and Coke Co. stock 5,S00 10,000 

Triumph Ins. Company stock 30,000 25,617 

First National Bank stock, Mansfield, 25,000 20,000 

National Rubber Co. stock .' 5,000 4,000 

Total par value and amount loaned thereon $110,380 §95,117 95,117.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office 1,081 .77 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 12,500.00 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 416.02 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 833.33 

Net premiums in due course of collection. 66,170.36 

Bills receivable, not matured 27,791.36 

All other property belonging to the Company 10,000.00 

Gross amount of assets of the Company §1,110,327.04 

Amount deducted, carried to suspense account 40,047.00 



Aggregate assets stated at their actual value $1,070,280.04 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $83,306.24 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses. . . . 64,030.46 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses. . . . 12,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $159,336.70 

Rc-insurancc at 50 per cent, of prem. on fire risks under one year. $326,744.70 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks more than one year 95,310.55 

Ke-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland risks 25,490.53 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 447,545.78 

All other demands against the Company 4,935.56 

Total liabilities, except stock $611,818.04 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $1,111 818.04 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash premiums received $1,117,971.81 $143,525.86 

Deduct reinsurance, rebate, and return premiums. 105,914.31 3,750.00 

Net cash received for premiums $1,012,057.50 $139,775.86 $1,151,833.36 

Notes for unpaid premiums $27,991.36 



44 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Eeceived for interest on bonds and mortgages 28,056.08 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 16,559.63 

Income from all other sources 25 581 .45 



Aggregate income received during the year in cash $1,222,030.52 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $440,956.79 $109,586.85 

Deduct salvages and rc-insurance 6,463.00 

Net amount paid for losses $440,956.79 $103,123.85 544,080.64 



Cash dividends actually paid 45,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 103,242.93 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 34,362.35 

Amount paid for state and local taxes 11,875.99 

All other payments and expenditures 100,053.79 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year $838,615.70 



AMERICAN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Penn. 

[Organized or Incorporated February, 1810.] 

THOMAS R. MARIS, President. ALBERT C. L. CRAWFORD, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, J. W. CRANDALL, Norwich. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 400,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $1 50,100.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 481,189.50 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 9,562.46 

Value of the lands mortgaged $359,075.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $389.000.00) 739,475.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $1,098,550.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



45 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 
Value. 

North Penn. R. R. Co. stock 85,000.00 

Union Bank of Tennessee stock 5,000.00 

Fhila. & Lancaster Turnpike Co. stock 900.00 

Coal Ridge Improvement & Coal Co. loan 10,000 00 

City and County of Erie, Penn., loan 1,600.00 

Elmira & Williamsport R. R. Co. loan, 5 per cent. 1,000.00 

Hairisburg, Port-., Mt.Joy & Lan. R. R. Co. loan, 10,000.00 

Delaware R. R. Co. loan, guaranteed 5,000.00 

Susquehanna Canal Co. loan 7,000.00 

Schuylkill Navigation Co. loan, 1 st mortgage 12,000.00 

" " 1S82, mortgage... 1,225.00 

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal Co. loan 10,000.00 

Little Schuylkill R. R. & Nav. Co. 7 per ct. loan.. 5,000.00 

County of Chester, Penn., loan 25,000.00 

Delaware Division Canal Co. loan, 1st mortgage.. 15,000.00 

Del. & Rar.Canal.andCam. & Am. R. R, & T. Co. loan. 3,000.00 

» " " " 24,000.00 

Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. loan 20,000.00 

State of Tennessee 5 per cent, loan 10,000.00 

State of Tennessee 6 per cent, loan 1 0,000.00 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, 5 per cent. loan.. 2,500.00 

Am. Steamship Co. loan, guaranteed hy Pa. R. R. Co. 15,000 00 

Trustees of University of Pennsylvania 10,000 00 

Total par and market value $208,225.00 



market 
Value. 

$5,000.00 



50.00 

8,000.00 

1,120.00 

570.00 

9,200.00 

4,500.00 

5,390.00 

9,480.00 

931.00 

8,900.00 

4,900.00 

25,000.00 

12,750.00 

2,940.00 

22,440.00 

17,500.00 

7,000.00 

7,925.00 

1,750.00 

12,000.00 

10,000.00 



$177,346.00 $177,346.00 



Loaned on Collaterals, 



Par Market Amount 

Value. Value. Loaned. 

Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. stock $20,000 $26,000 $18,000 

lvaniaR.R. Co. stock ,. 19,850 22,529.75 8,500 

Philadelphia & Reading R. It. Co. stock 10,000 11,800) ^ 

Susquehanna Canal Co. t>ood 1,000 770) ' 

Little Schuylkill R R., Coal & Navigation Co. stock 10,000 9,500 5,000 

Buck Mountain Coal Co. stock 1,000 800 500 

American Fire Insurance Co. stock 3,000 3,750 3,5nn 

Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon $64,850 $75,149.75 *15,500 



45,500.00 



All other loans 

Cash in Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

In Fidelity Ins., Trust & Safe Deposit Co 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in "market value". 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the Company 



Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. 



41,040.83 
1,825.57 

91,502.48 

60,000.00 
4,100.61 
1,753.49 

31,347.78 
807.05 



$1,096,075.77 



46 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $3,349.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . . 237,026.42 
Losses resisted, interest, costs, and expenses thereon 2,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses 242,375.42 

■Re-insurance at 50 per cent $128,068.69 

Re-insurance pro rata 43,894.02 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 171,962.71 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies 263,095.96 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 862.50 

Total liabilities, except stock and net surplus $678,296.59 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 400,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 17,779.18 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $1,096,075.77 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $330,830.16 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 28,152.00 

Net cash actually received for premiums $302,678.16 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 27,448.53 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 32,247.45 

Income received from all other sources 19, 525. 38 

Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks $20,182.53 

Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $381,899.52 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $292,100.40 

Cash dividends actually paid 60,420.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 68,77 1 .67 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 10,666.63 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes ■ 6,623.32 

All other payments and expenditures 5,860.79 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash §444,442.81 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 47 



ARCTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 

[Incorporated July 18, 1853.] 

VINCENT TILYON, President. CHARLES BAMBURGH, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, SILAS CHAPMAN, Jr., Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized, $250,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash, 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Value of real estate owned by the Company $14,459.1 1 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) 45,000.00 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loans 1,575.00 

Value of the land mortgaged $32,000.00 

Value of mortgaged premises, (insured for $47,000.00) 76,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $108,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

U. S. 6 per cent, bonds, registered $175,000.00 $197,750.00 

Total market value $197,750.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value, value. loaned. 

Central & Hudson River R. R. bonds $13,900 814,500 $11,000 



Total par and market value and amouut loaned thereon. .. . 8513,900 $14,500 $11,000 $11,000.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 4,438.69 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 3,065.21 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 73.77 

Premiums in due course of collection 20,939.87 

Bills receivable not matured, $7,619.25 ; past due, $510.00 8,129.25 

All other property belonging to the Company 9,834.92 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value.. $316,265.82 



48 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



in. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $1,541.81 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 96,071.69 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 3,375.00 

Gross amount of unpaid lossses $100,988.50 

Deduct re-insurance thereon 11,497.52 

Net amount of unpaid losses $89,495.98 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $44,974.36 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . 3,740.74 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks 3,423.18 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 52,144.28 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 285.00 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc 683.33 

Due agents and brokers on premiums 2,316.67 

Total liabilities, except stock $144,9ii5.26 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 250,1)00.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $394,925.26 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $123,549.79 $65,061,46 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium.. . 18,685.07 34,662.47 

Net cash received for premiums $104,864.72 $30,398.99 $135,263.71 

Bills and notes receipted for premiums unpaid $7,879.25 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 3,465.00 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 12,957.35 

Income received from all other sources 229.63 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $151,915.69 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. 



Gross amount paid for losses $82,865.09 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 557.27 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $82,307.82 $24,503.20 106,811.02 



Marine and 
Inland. 

$42,831.58 

18,328.38 



Dividends actually paid 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes. 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 



Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash. 



25,450.00 
21,808.04 
19,571.68 
6,922.68 
15,560.18 



$196,123.60 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 49 

SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 

Of the condition of the Arctic Fire Insurance Company, March 1, 1873. 

I. CAPITAL. 
Amount of Joint Stock or guaranteed Capital authorized $200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Eeal estate $12,500.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, first liens 33,000.00 

Loans on collaterals 102,000.00 

Stocks and bonds 57,525.00 

Cash in bank and office 36,850.47 

Net premiums in due course of collection 1 2,430.33 

Accrued interest 1,096.66 

Salvages on losses paid 8,619.03 

All other property 11 ,446.22 

Aggregate amount of assets $275,467.71 

Unpaid assessments $9,966.50 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Unpaid losses $8,613.50 

Unpaid dividends 127.50 

Due for re-insurance 1,964.47 

Re-insurance 59,046.13 

Liabilities, except capital $69,751.60 

Capital stock 200,000.00 

Surplus over capital 5,716.11 

Liabilities, including capital stock and net surplus $275,467.71 



50 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

[Incorporated, December 30, 1871.] 

JOHN D. COCKS, President. WILLIAM D. CORNELL, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, JUDAH FRISBIE, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized s -' 0,000.0 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash * 200 > 



II. ASSETS. 

! j m ,v,»,i $35,300.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first hens) 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 

Value of the lands mortgaged $ 44 ,500.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $30,200.00) 46,000.00 



Total value. 



890,500.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



Par 
Value. 



U. S. Registered bonds, 1881 . $50,000.00 

U. S. Registered 5 20 bonds, 1 865 50,000.00 

U. S. Coupon 5-20 bonds, 1865 50,000 00 



Market 

Villus. 

$57,312.50 

56,375.00 

56,625.00 



Total par and market value $150,00000 $170,312.50 $170,312.50 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Tar 
Value. 



United 



States bonds, 1881 $25,000 



1885.. 

1SS1.. 



Delaware, Lackawanna & W. R. It. stock. 
Elizabeth City bonds 



10,000 

10,000 

13,251 

1,000 



Market 

Value. 

$29,000 
11,325 
11,462.50 
12,458.76 
930 



Amount 
Loaned. 

$25,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

900 



Total par and market value and amount loaned $59,254 $66,176 26 $55,900 



$55,900.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in hank. 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 



Aggregate amount of all assets. 



10,852.35 

9,312.45 

85.65 

21,130.67 






COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



51 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including: all reported and supposed losses $31,327.08 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses thereon. 2,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $33,827.08 

Re-insurance upon fire risks running one year or less at 50 per cent. $53,087.73 
Re-insurance, prorata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . . 1,926.05 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $55,013.78 

Total amount of liabilities, except capital , $88,840.86 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 14,422.59 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including capital and net surplus $303,263.45 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $1 62,384.77 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 17,347.91 

Net cash received for premiums $145,036.86 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 540.50 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, and from all other sources. 16,600.21 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash . $162,177.57 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $38,692.40 

Deduct salvages 4.95 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $38,687.45 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 12,053.03 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 23,629.78 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 2,630.00 

All other payments and expenditures, viz : stationery, &c ... 1,953.39 

•Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $78,953.65 



52 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Providence, R. I. 

[Incorporated, May, 1852.] 

J. S. PARISH, President. T. W. HAYWARD, Jr., Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, W. E. BAKER, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of Joint Stock or Guaranteed Capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 200,000-00 

II. ASSETS. 
Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $ 144,436. 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 

Value. 

Globe National Bank stock $10,000.00 

Northern Bank stock 12,000.00 

Weybossct National Bank stock 10,000.00 

Fifth National Bank stock 600.00 

American National Bank stock 10,000.00 

American Exch. National Bank stock, N. Y 2,100.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, N. Y 10,000.00 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. stock 10,000.00 

Mich. Central R. R. Co. stock 10,000.00 

Chicago, Bock I. & P. R. R. Co. stock 10,000.00 

City of Elizabeth bonds 10,000.00 

Chicago, B. & Q. R. U. bonds 10,000.00 

Total par and market value $104,7 00.00 



Market 
Value. 

$11,600.00 

11,400.00 

12,000.00 

720.00 

10,800.00 

2,373.00 

11,200.00 

11,'JOO.OO 

1 1 ,450.00 

11,100.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

$114,543.00 $114,543.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

Nicholson File Co. stock $9,250 

National Exch. Bank Mock 80 ° 

American Steamboat Co. stock 3 . 000 

Providence Oas Co. stock '-' • j'_" ' 

Mechanics National Bank stock 750 

Lexington Copper Mining Co. stock 1,950 

Union ISank slock 

Paid since Deeembei 81st 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon JliM '" 



value. 


loaned. 


$7,400 


$5,630.69 


960 


779.22 


3,000 


362.50 


4, -100 


1,712.50 


900 


750.00 


780 


187.60 


500 


i ! 




6,717.26 



$13,000 $15,698.25 



$15,698.26 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



53 



Special deposit in Union Savings Bank 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank. 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, not matured 

All other property belonging to the Company 



Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value. 



$41,400.00 

3,143.03 

23,879.82 

621.94 

14,146.19 

1,622.50 

4,226.70 

$363,717.69 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Net amount of unpaid losses 

Reinsurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks $22,254.94 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on marine risks 7,054.17 



Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks. 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 

Due for salaries, rent, advertising, and other expenses 



Total liabilities except stock 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus. 



$142,345.82 



$29,309.11 

436.00 

1,218.75 

$173,309.68 
200,000.00 

$373,309.68 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. 



Gross premiums received in cash $48,937.75 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums, 19,850.77 



Marine. 
$21,460 59 



$29,086.98 

Net cash actually received for premiums $50,547.57 

Bills and notes received for premiums $1,622.50 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 10,779.62 

Income received from all other sources 8 400.22 

Received for calls on capital $200,000.00 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash, $69,727.41 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross amount actually paid for losses. 
Deduct salvages 



Tire. 
$167,946.65 



Marine. 
$12,810.93 
2,766.54 



Net amount paid for losses $167,946.65 $10,044.39 177,991.04 



Cash dividends actually paid 

Paid and allowed for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash 



20,042.00 
8,098.17 
7,463.25 
1,128.68 
4,724.80 



$219,447.94 



54 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



BANGOR FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Bangor, Maine. 
[Organized or Incorporated, February, 1872.] 
M. LINCOLN, President. JOHN S. CHAD WICK, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, L. W. SFERRY, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount ofjoint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loan3 on bond and mortgage *- '» 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 9,528.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged $417,500.00 

Loans on Collaterals. 

I'ar Market Amount 
Value. Value. loaned. 

Nati onal Bank stock, Bangor .JWJ WJ0 .6,000 

KeuduskeagBank stock. Bangor •• JO 2,00 2 000 

Orono Bank stock. 

]!:l ngor Boom (^ock 

Maine Telegraph Co. stock > » 

--—■---j*" :::::: SS ;! KX 

n..vtpr Me. Town bonds ' 

Bcxter.we 60Q g 00Q 

United States 6-20 bonds - > 

Burlington & Cedar Rapids R. R bonds ,000 00 1,000 

Penobscot BoomandO.dtown Bridge Co. stock 1,000 1,100 1,000 

Androscoggin » Kennebec R. R. bond, • 2 300 2 0,0 -,00C> 

State of Maine bonds __J__ __J _ 

Total par and market value and amount loaned m450 $40,568 _ M8,200 a3,200.00 

. ... §8,400.00 

Bills receivable _ 

Cash in the Company's principal office '.'. ! . 

Casb belonging to the Company deposited in bank 15,787.27 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 1,403.00 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 18,189.29 

Bills receivable, not matured 6 ,656.63 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . . $309,282.25 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



55 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Not amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $ 24,700.37 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire ri^ks running more than one year. . . . 6,297.65 

Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 6,656.63 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. . 



$50,805.96 



$37,714.65 
929.45 



$89,450.06 

200,000.00 

19,832.19 

$3i)9,282.25 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. 



Gross cash received for premiums $58,160.95 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums.. 577.28 

Net cash received for premiums $57,583.67 



Marine. 
$16,150.18 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages. 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources, 



Aggregate income received during the year in cash . 



873,733.85 

10,625.00 
156.55 

$84,515.40 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid for losses. 



Fire. 
$11,599.60 



Marine. 
$54.00 



Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c, 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States,. 
All other payments and expenditures 



Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash. 



$11,653.60 

9,574.20 

1,320.55 

99.48 

2,864.03 



$25,511.86 



56 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



BLACK RIVER FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Watertown, N. Y. 
[Incorporated, March, 1872.] 
G. LORD, Vice-President. ORIN C. FROST, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, JUDAH FRISBIE, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of Joint Stock or guaranteed capital authorized $250,000.00 

Amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered * 15 > 

Loans on bond and mortgage in' 867 85 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans > 

Value of the lands mortgaged $353,425.00 

Value of buildings, (insured for $60,550.00) 90,825.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $444,250.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

r.ir Market 

Value. Value. 

United States Currency, Sixes $50,000.00 $56,625.00 

Total market value 56,625.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office v ^ 98/ .00 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 97,108.43 

Gross premiums in due course of collection ' 

All other property belonging to the Company * , ''"' /a 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. , $377,621.58 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, $24,262.15 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses, 49,954.85 

Gross amount of claims for losses $74,217.00 

Deduct re-insurance 3,/ 50.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $70,467.00 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 57 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $59,413.44 
Re-insurance on fire risks running more than one year, pro rata. . 3,645.01 



Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 63,058.45 

Total liabilities, except stock $133,525.45 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $383,525.45 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $137,038.18 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 5,233.57 

Net cash received for premiums $131,804.61 

Interest received on bonds and mortgages 3,175.99 

Income received from all other sources 460.00 

Received for calls on capital $62,500.00 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $197,940.60 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $36,097.97 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 19,997.95 

Paid for salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 14,244.30 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 4,585.67 

All other payments and expenditures 10,982.70 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $85,908.59 



BREWERS AND MALTSTERS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York Citt. 

[Organized or Incorporated September, 1871.] 

C. W. STANDART, President. W. B. OGDEN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, W. C. HASTINGS, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 
Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $200,000.00 

8 



58 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $22,000.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 

Value of lands mortgaged $40,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $20,000.00) 23,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value 

United States currency, C's $100,000 00 $1 13,500.00 

New York City bonds 26,000.00 000-00 

Total par and market value $126,000.00 



$139,500.00 



Chicago, B. & Q. R. R. stock. . 
Central R. R. stock, N. Jersey. 
Continental Ins. Co. stock... 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

$ 00 

1,000 

5,000 



Market 
value. 

1,080.62 

5,500 00 



Total par and market value, and amount loaned. . 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value".. 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable not matured taken for fire, marine, and inland risks. 
All other property belonging to the Company 

Aggregate assets stated at their actual value 



Amount 
loaned. 



$5,300.00 



$7,098.12 §5,300.00 



$5,300.00 

5,118.92 

14,020.51 

758.84 

105.00 
29,710.59 
52,082.44 
15,754.25 



$284,373.38 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 



Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, of prcm. on fire risks under one year. 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks more than one year 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland risks 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Due and accrued for salaries, advertising, and other expenses.. . . 
All other demands against the Company 



Total liabilities, except stock 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital. 



$6,629.00 
40,371.00 



$48,976.18 

2,987.91 

22,109.68 



$47,000.00 



74,073.77 
458.33 
298 :>7 

$121,830.67 
200,000.00 



5321,830.67 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 59 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YE^.P. 

Murine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash premiums received SI 55,441.76 $53,847.20 

Notes for unpaid premiums 29,300.26 

Gross cash received for premiums S155.441.76 $83,213.46 

Deduct reinsurance, rebate, and return premiums. 22.045.06 17,950.S1 

Net cash received for premiums $133,396.70 $65,262.65 $198,659.35 

Bills and notes received for premiums unpaid $52,082.44 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 945.97 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 11,148.31 

Income from all other sources 1,934.57 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $212 688.20 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses £139,006. 82 $61,453.78 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 1,039.16 722.23 

Net amount paid for losses $138,027.66 $60,731.55 198,759.21 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 33 944.84 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 30,873.01 

Amount paid for state and local taxes 2 260.23 

All other payments and expenditures 8 94C.64 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year $274,783.93 



BUFFALO GERMAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Buffalo, N. Y. 
[Organized or Incorporated February, 1867.] 
PHILIP BICKER, President. ALEXANDER MARTIN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 



60 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



II. ASSETS. 

Eeal estate owned by the Company, unincumbered 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 

Value of the lands mortgaged S38.045.O0 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $21 ,450.00) 52,250.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $90,295.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 
Pat 

Value. 

U S 5-20 bonds of 1865, new registered $77,500.00 

" coupon 32,500.00 

" of 1867, coupon 20,000.00 

U S 10-40 bonds, registered ' 30,000.00 

Buffalo City bonds 25,000.00 

iBtna Ins. Co. stock, New York 10,000.00 



Market 
Value. 

$87,962.50 

36,887.50 

22,700 00 

33,000.00 

25,000.00 

10,000.00 



$40,000.00 
24,150.00 



Total par and market value $195,00000 $215^5000 $215,550.00 



Loaned on Collaterals. 

Par 

Value. 

City of Milwaukee bond $ 500 

B.,N. Y. & Ph. R. R- stock 2 ' 000 

Manufacturers & T. Bank stock, Buffalo 2,500 

German Bank stock, Buffalo 1 ' 000 

Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . . $6,000 



Market 
Value. 


Amount 
Loaned. 


$500) 




1,300 \ 


$4,000 


2.500 ) 




1,000 


900 



$5,000 S4.900 



Cash in Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest accrued on stock not included in " market value" 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable not matured taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 

All other property belonging to the Company 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. , 



4,900.00 

965.87 
68,548.19 
583.35 
983.14 
980.24 
2,195.73 



$358,856.52 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . . $13,125.00 

Losses resisted, interest, costs, and expenses thereon 1,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses _ 14,625.00 

Ke-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $76,046.57 

Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than oue year . . 4,917.27 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 80,963.84 

Total liabilities, except stock $95,588.84 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 'Tf^-'Tc, 

, * 4 i 63.26* .08 

Surplus beyond capital ^ 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus 8358 ,856.52 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 61 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction §152,318.49 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 9,972.92 

Net cash actually received for premiums $142,3 15.57 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 1,715.14 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources. 14,617.18 

Income received from all other sources 4,900.65 

Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $163,578.54 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $64,488.06 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 1,282.04 

Net amount paid for losses $63,206.02 

Cash dividends actually paid 20,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 18,539.97 

Salaries and oilier charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 9,282.83 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 2,811.49 

All other payments and expenditures 10,603.84 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash $124,444.15 



CAPITAL CITY INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Albany, N. Y. 
[Incorporated February 1st, 1865.] 

FRANK CHAMBERLAIN, President. JAMES F. CROSBY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, RALPH GILLETT, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized, $150,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash, 150,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

U. S. Sixes of 1881, registered $86,000.00 $98,900.00 

U. S. 5-20s of 1 867, registered 54,500.00 62, 130.00 

Central Pacific 1st mortgage gold bonds 9,000.00 8,910.00 

Total par and market value $149,500.00 $169,940.00 $109,940.00 



62 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value. value. loaned. 

Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg R. R. Co. stock 53,000 $3,000 $2,000 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon... $3,000 $3,000 $2,000 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 

Interest (hie and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the Company 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value.. 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $1,503.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 3,147.00 



Net amount of unpaid lossses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year 

Rc-iusurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . , 



$10,959.84 
111.46* 



Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks 
Due and accrued for salaries, rent, etc 



Total liabilities, except stock 

Stock capital actually paid up iu cash 

Surplus beyond capital, as regards policyholders 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus. 



$2,000.00 

165.00 

2,151.31 

5,007.05 

42.67 

3,804.95 

600.00 



$1S3,710.9S 



$4,650.00 



11,071.30 
1,121.00 



$16,84 2.30 

150,000.00 

16,868.68 

§183,710.98 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $20,888.87 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium J. 503 - 73 

Net cash received for premiums 

Interest and dividends received from all sources 

Received for calls on capital $50,000.00 

Ao-'Tcgate income received during the year in cash 



$19,385.14 
5,276.50 

824,661.64 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $19,694.64 

Deduct salvages and re insurance j 703.44 

Net amount paid during the year for losses 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments ana expenditures 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash 



$18,991.20 

2,069.66 

4,133.28 

231.20 

5,487.73 

$30,913.07 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 63 



CITIZENS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York Citt. 

[Incorporated, April, 1836.] 

JAMES M. MCLEAN,. President. EDWARD A. WALTON, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, W. E. BAKER, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized $2,500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Value of real estate owned by the Company $45,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) * 146,900.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 658.87 

Value of the lands mortgaged $225,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $125,200.00) 185,500.00 

Total value $41 0,500.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1867 $100,000.00 8113,500.00 

" " 6 per cent, reg'd bonds, 1S81 50,000.00 57,250.00 

" " 5-20 coupon bonds, 1865, '67 100,000.00 113,500.00 

Commonwealth of Virginia 6 per cent, bonds 30,000.00 16,500.00 

South Carolina 6 per cent. State bonds 20,000.00 10,000.00 

Lake Shore & Mich. South. R. R. Co. bonds 50,000.00 50,000.00 

National Citizens Bank stock 1 5,000.00 22,500.00 



Total par and market value $365,000.00 $383,250.00 ■ $383,250.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

Value. 

Manhattan Life Ins Co stock $1,000 

" " " " 1,000 

National Citizens Bank stock 

" " " " 4,250 

Harlem Bank stock 2,500 

Butchers & Drovers National Bank stock 2,500 

N T . Y. Balance Dock Co. stock 1,600 

Metropolitan Gas Light Co. stock 2,000 

Real Estate Trust Co. stock 4,000 

Bank of the Metropolis stock 2,500 



Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$4,000 


81.500 


4,000 


2,000 


1,500 


1,200 


0,375 
2,500 


] 6,500 


3,375 


2,500 


1,500 


1,200 


3,000 


~\ 


4,000 


> 7,500 


2,500 


) 



64 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Rank of the Metropolis stock «3 OCX) 

Union Trust Co. stock 

Harlem Gas Light Co. stock 

Manhattan Gas Light Co. stock 

N. Y. Central & Hudson River R. R. stock 



" bonds... 
L. Shore & Michigan Southern R. R. bonds. 
United States 6 percent, bonds, 1881 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1865 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1865 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1S62 



$8,000 


$3,000 


$2,500 


7,800 


13,650 


10,000 


5,650 


9.8S7.50 


J 10,000 


3,750 


8,625 


40,000 


39,800 


20,000 


10,000 


9,950 


8,000 


1,000 


1,000 


850 


5,000 


5,000 


4,000 


500 


572.50 


500 


10,000 


11,300 


10,000 


100 


113 


) 


600 


685.50 


| 700 



Total par and market value and amount loaned $109,650 §136,333.50 $88,950 $88,960.00 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 25,590.16 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 1,625.00 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 898.92 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 33,340.73 

All other properly belonging to the Company 15,479.21 

Aggregate amount of all assets $741,692.89 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses against the Company, adjusted and unpaid $3,173.66 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 128,451.34 

Net amount of unpaid losses $131,625.00 

Ec-insurance upon fire risks running one year or less at 50 per cent. $164,118.06 
Ee-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year 35,054.52 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $192,659.73 

Interest due and remaining unpaid 28.50 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 279.30 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 1,500.00 

Eeturn premiums 1,200.00 

Total amount of liabilities, except capital $327,292.53 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 1 14,400.36 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including capital and net surplus $741,692.89 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAE. 

Gross cash received for premiums $386,981.31 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 35,878.40 

Net cash received for premiums $351 102.91 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 9 469.50 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, and from all other sources. 42,002.97 

Income received from all other sources 2 279.17 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $404,854.55 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 65 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR, 

Gross amount paid for losses $315,143.78 

Deduct for re-insurance ' 7,942.30 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $307,201.48 

Cash dividends actually paid 52,536.06 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 23,876.06 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 51,083.75 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 7,596.85 

All other payments and expenditures, viz : stationery, &c ... 27,364.00 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $469,658.20 



COMMERCE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Albany, N. Y. 

[Incorporated, June, 1859.] 

ADAM VAN ALLEN, President. RICHARD VARICK DeWITT, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. C. KIMBALL, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of Joint Stock or Guaranteed Capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $45,000.00 

Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

T"ar Market 

Value. Value. 

United States bonds, currency sixes $250,000.00 $282,500.00 

First National Bank of Albany stock 12,500.00 21,250.00 

Total par and market value $262,500.00 $303,750.00 $303,750.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 982.12 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 30,254.43 

Interest due and accrued on bonds not included in " market value" 250.00 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 19,421.30 

All other property belonging to the Company 500.00 

Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value $400,157.85 

9 



66 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid SI ,500.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 51,985.00 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 1,100.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $54,585 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less. . $99,256.30 
Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one } T ear 24,642.83 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $123,899.13 

All other demands against the Company 3,916.56 

Total liabilities except stock S1S2.400.69 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 17,757.16 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus 8400,157.85 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash $236,162.82 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 22,475.90 

Net cash actually received for premiums $213,686.92 

Interest and dividends received on bonds and mortgages and from other sources. 21,706.95 

Income received from all other sources , 2,793.05 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash, £238,186.92 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses $185,139.81 

Deduct re-insurance 8,450.57 

Net amount paid for losses , $176,689.24 

Cash dividends actually paid 10,000.00 

Paid and allowed for commissions and brokerage 31,159.23 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 15,585.35 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 9,761.11 

All other payments and expenditures 1 2,849.35 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $256,044.28 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



67 



CONTINENTAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 

[Incorporated, November, 1852.] 

GEORGE T. HOPE, President. CYRUS PECK, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, SHERMAN HARTWELL, Bridgeport. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of Joint Stock or guaranteed capital authorized $1,000,000.00 

Amount of Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered $632,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 452,300.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 15,307.89 

Value of the lands mortgaged §536,400.00 

Value of buildings, (insured for $432,621.00) 806,350.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises §1,342,750.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 
Value. 

Dry Goods Bank stock, N. Y. City $3,500.00 

St. Nicholas National Bank stock, N. Y. City. 17,500.00 

Alabama 8 per cent, bonds 10,000.00 

South Carolina 6 per cent, (old) bonds 20,000.00 

Tennessee 6 per cent, (old) bonds 20,000.00 

United States 6 per cent, bonds of 1881 60,000.00 

United States 6 per cent, currency bonds 400,000.00 

Total par and market value $531 ,000.00 



Market 
Value. 

$3,500.00 

19,862.50 

8,400.00 

10,000.00 

16,000.00 

68,700.00 

453,000.00 

$579,462.50 $579,462.50 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

United States Life Ins. Co. stock 89,550 

Brooklyn City R. R. Co. stock 2,250 

Broadway Ins. Co. stock 1,000 

Safe Deposit Co. of New York Stock 2,500 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. stock 1,600 

National Park Bank stock 1,500 

Lafayette Fire Ins. Co. stock 1,000 

Hanover National Bank stock 1,600 



Market 




Amount 


value. 




loaned. 


§14,325 




$9,000 


4,500 
1,500 


} 


2,850 


2,500 
1,920 


} 


3,500 


2,250 
1,000 


} 


2,500 


1,520 




1,320 



68 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

United States Trust Co. stock 500 

Long Island Safe Deposit Co. stock » 1,000 

Government Security Life Ins. Co. stock 1,500 

St. Nicholas National Hank stock 2,500 

Fulton Hank of Brooklyn stock 4,000 

Metropolitan National Hank 1,200 

Home Life Ins Co. stock. Brooklyn 2,000 

Safe Deposit Co. of New York stock 3.500 

N.York Central* Hudson River R. R. Co. stock 5,000 

United States bonds, registered 6s, 1S81 2,000 

" " " " 2,000 

Georgia 7 per cent bonds 1 500 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon $47,7u0 558,902.50 $41,270 §41,270.00 



1,125 v 




760 


2,000 


1,500 ) 




2,837.50 


2,000 


4.S00 


4,000 


1,660 ) 




2,400 [ 


5,000 


3,500 ) 




5,000 


4,000 


2,290 


2,100 


2,290 


1.900 


1,385 


1,200 



Cash belonging to the Company in office and deposited in hank 389,706.29 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 1 ,913.41 

Net premiums in due course of collection 1 08,798.55 

All other property belonging to the Company 3,433.33 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. $2,284,251 .97 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses, .... 409,770.58 
Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses thereon. 13,000.00 

Gross amount of claims for losses $422,770.58 

Deduct re-insurance 42,042.66 

Net amount of unpaid losses $380,127.92 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year $500,447.68 

lie insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year. . . 240,727.59 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks $801,175.27 

Principal unpaid on scrip or certificates of profits 33,490.00 

Interest due and unpaid 14,570.02 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 1,724.50 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $1,231,093.71 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 53,158.26 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. . $2,284,251.97 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $1,721,435.34 

Deduct reinsurance, rebate, and return premiums 172,281.99 

Net cash received for premiums $1,549,153.35 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 31,572.34 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources, 52,051.84 

Income from all other sources 24,7 1 1 .80 

Received for calls on capital $400,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $1,657,489.33 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 69 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses. ... $1,778,099.29 

Deduct salvages and reinsurance 30,712.24 

Net amount paid for losses $1 ,747,387.05 

Cash dividends actually paid 61,702.52 

Scrip or certificates of profit redeemed in cash 13,217.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 273,432.80 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c 161,333.93 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 43,933.27 

All other payments and expenditures 142,633.46 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash 82,443,640.03 



EQUITABLE FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Providence, R. I. 

[Incorporated, May, 1859.] 

THOMAS G. TURNER, President. FRED. W. ARNOLD, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. C. KIMBALL, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300,000.00 

Whole amount of capita] actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $70,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Old National Bank stock, Providence §50,000.00 $62,500.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock, Providence.. . 25,000.00 27,000.00 

American National Bank stock, Providence 25,000.00 27,250.00 

Third National Bank stock, Providence 3,000.00 3,600.00 

Butchers & Drovers Bank stock, Providence 5,000.00 4,500.00 

Manufacturers National Bank stock, Providence.. 15,000.00 17,250.00 

First National Bank of Warren stock 10,000.00 11,400.00 

Union Bank stock, Providence 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Rhode Island National Bank stock, Providence. . . 5,000.00 4,000.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, Providence 10,000.00 11,900.00 



70 FIRE AND FIUE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Par Market 

Value. Value. 



New Fork City 7 p. ct. Street Improvcm't Bonds. $50,000.00 §50,000.00 

City of Elizabeth 7 per eent. Bonds 25,000.00 24,000.00 

City of Jersey ( Sty 7 per cent. Bonds 10,000.00 9,900.00 

New York, Providence & Boston Railroad Bonds. 50,000.00 50,000.00 

Michigan Central Railroad Bonds 30,000.00 30,000.00 

Massachusetts Back Bay Bonds 11,2.38.54 10,000.00 



Total par and market value 8329,238.54 $348,300.00 S348,300.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office $186.60 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 5 953.29 

Gross Premiums in due course of collection 18,290.84 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 879.40 

All other property belonging to the Company 300.00 

Aggregate amount of Assets stated at their actual value $443,910.13 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $265,229.48 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 50,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $315,229.48 

Re-insurance upon fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $38,133.06 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year 16,731.59 

Rc-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks 241.68 

Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 6,497.31 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $61 ,603.64 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 90.00 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 1,500.00 

All other demands against the company 2,600.00 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $381,023.12 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 300,000.00 

Aggregate amount of all liabilities, including paid-up capita] and net surplus. 5681,023.12 
IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross premiums received in cash $103,799.76 $50,995.37 

Gross cash received on bills and notes 9.31 .21 

Gross cash received for premiums $103,799.76 $51,926.58 

Deduct reinsurance, and return premiums.. 12,665.85 7,602.20 

Net cash received for premiums $91,133.91 $44,324.38 $135,458.29 



Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. $22,553.25 

Received from all other sources 4,-070.53 

Received for increased capital $100,000.00 

Aggregate amount received during the year in cash $162,OS2.07 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 71 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. Marine and Iuland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $05,417.50 $22,833.69 

Deduct amounts received for salvages, &c 333.34 1,907.95 



Net amount paid during the year for losses. ... 365,084.16 $20,925.74 $86,009.90 



Cash dividends actually paid .' 25,303.00 

Paid for commissions or brokerage 17,555.06 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 16,262.56 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 4,051.15 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash S148,181.67 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 

Of the condition of the Equitable Fire and Marine Insurance Company, January 25, 1873. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up iu cash ' 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real cs te owned by Company, unincumbered $70,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value Value. 

Old National Bank stock, Providence $50,000.00 $60,000.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock, Providence.. 25,000.00 27,250.00 

American National Bank stock, Providence 14,300.00 15,730.00 

Third National Bank stock, Providence 3,000.00 3,480.00 

Butchers & Drovers Bank stock, Providence 5,000.00 4,500.00 

Manufacturers National Bank stock, Providence. 10,000.00 11,600.00 

Union Bank stock, Providence 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Rhode Island National Bank stock, Providence. 5,000.00 4,000.00 

First National Bank of Warren stock 10,000.00 11,000.00 

Fourth National Bank stock, Providence 10,000.00 11,400.00 

City of Elizabeth 7 per cent, bonds 25,000.00 24,000.00 

City of Jersey City 7 per cent, bonds 10,000.00 9,950.00 

Michigan Central Railroad bonds 13,000.00 13,000.00 

Massachusetts Back Bav bonds 11,238.54 10,000.00 



Total par and market value $196,538.54 $210,910.00 $210,910.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 12,264 12 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 16,923.50 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 19,491.17 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 613.32 

Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value $330,202.11 



'■" FIRE AND EIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $52 576 9g 

Losses unadjusted ll.MO.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $63,966.98 

Ke-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $34,51 1.1 6 
Reinsurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one vear. . 16,731 .59 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks "..... '041 .68 

Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 5 304.64 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks. . . .TTTTTTTTTTTTT $56 789 07 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid ' 40 00 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 500 00 

All other demands against the company . „ 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock « I0 . - QC n . 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 900 000 00 

Surplus beyond capital.. 

5,406.06 



Aggregate liabilities, including stock and surplus $S3 q 



202.11 



EXCHANGE FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Located in New York City. 
[Organized or Incorporated, April, 1853.] 
RICHARD C. COMBES, Present. GE0 RGE W. MONTGOMERY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, JUDAH FRISBIE, New Haven. 



I. CAPITAL. 

orized g 

200,010.00 



Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash ,3™ 



II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loan's $ ' 51 ;. 3 " "°° 

Value of the land mortgaged [""'" '££^ "» J1M 

Valucof buildings mortgaged (insured for$147,550 as collateral), 200,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $426^00<M>0 

Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

PM Market 

tt -l 1 <-> ' *lue. Value 

United States registered bonds, 1881 $40,000.00 846,200 00 

United States coupon bonds, 1 881 \0,QOO.W 1 I 600 00 

n!!!!.?! f!:\ tc ! L m,po " , b0IU ] s ' )lVr 20 > 000 - 00 23,000.00 

11,300.00 



United States coupon bonds, 1864 10000 00 



Total par and market value 1^000.00 $92,100.00 $92,100.00 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 73 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

• Value. Value. loaned. 

United States 5-20 bonds 84,500 85,175 $4,500 

Erie Railway mortgage bonds 4,000 3,800 2,500 

National Mechanics Banking Association stock 3,750 4,125 3,700 

Commercial Ins. Co. stock 500 450 350 

Harlam Gas Light Co. stock 2,450 3,675 \ 

Peter Cooper Fire Ins. Co. stock 500 750 C 4,000 

Broadway Fire Ins Co. stock 375 562.50 ) 

Brooklyn Permanent Water Loan "1,000 950 600 

Manhattan Life Ins. Co. stock 1,500 6,000 2,000 

Rutgers Fire Ius. Co. stock 2,000 3,200 \ 

Citizens Bank stock 1,500 2,100 (5,000 

Oriental Bank stock 500 600 j 

St. Nicholas Fire Ins. Co. stock 1,775 1,420 700 



Total par and market value and amount loaned S24.350 $31,857.50 $23,350 $23,350.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office 1,917.05 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 14,282.38 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 443.66 

Net premiums in due course of collection 25,906.53 

All other property belonging to the Company 11,048.75 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . . $323,375.31 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, $3,550.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 22,150.00 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 8,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $34,200.00 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $83,754.07 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . . 2,215.22 

Re-insurance on inland navigation risks 350.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $86,319.29 

Dividends remaining unpaid 104.70 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 1,500.00 

Liabilities, except capital $122,123.99 

Capital stock paid up in cash 200,010.00 

Surplus beyond capital 1,241.32 

Liabilities, including capital stock and net surplus $323,375.31 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $237,102.36 $1,085.50 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums, 31,873.89 

Net cash received for premiums $205,228.47 $1,085.50 $206,313.97 

Received for interest on honds and mortgages 10,103.91 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources.. 7,617.80 

Income received from all other sources 2,979.13 

Aggregate amount of income $227,014.81 

10 — — 



74 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $136,209.23 

Dividends actually paid 10,000.50 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 23,208.79 

Paid for salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 20,127.08 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 5,359.87 

All other payments and expenditures 20,311.66 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $21 5,217.13 



FAME INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Penn. 
[Organized or Incorporated April, 1856.] 
CHARLES RICHARDSON, President. WILLIAMS I. BLANCHARD, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized » $200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company $3,500.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 84,600.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 3,599.20 

Value of lands mortgaged $35,100.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 159,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $194,100.00 



Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

Philadelphia City 6 per cent, bonds $20,000.00 $20,000.00 

National Bank of the Republic stock 50,000.00 50,000.00 

Second National Bank stock 10,000.00 10,800.00 

Chamber of Commerce stock 400.00 400.00 



Total par and market value $80,400.00 $81,200.00 $81,200.00 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



75 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

National Bank of the Republic stock $13,000 

United States bonds. 3,000 

Second National Bank stock 3,000 

Fame Ins. Co. stock 9,150 



Market 


Amount 


value- 


loaned. 


$13,000 


§12,500 


3,360 


3,000 


3,900 


3,000 


9,000 


3.660 



Total par and market value, and amount loaned $28,150 $29,260 $22,100 



$22,100.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks notincluded in " market value". 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the Company 



Asrsregate assets stated at their actual value . 



14,001.49 

4,694.18 

740.66 

324.44 

12,271.89 

3,750.00 



$230,781.86 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies. 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital 



$15,000.00 
23,365.00 
21,258.91 

$59,623.91 
200,000.00 

$259,623.91 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross cash received for premiums $61,154.86 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 1,807.21 

Net cash received for premiums 

Interest received on bonds and Ynortgages, and dividends on stocks and bonds. .. 
Income received from all other sources 



Aggregate Income received during the year in cash. 



$59,347.65 

12,225.93 

450.00 

$72,023.58 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid during the year for losses 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Paid for salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, etc. 
All other payments and expenditures including taxes 

Aggregate amount of expenditures 



$49,684.13 
6,064.12 
3,600.00 
7,758.58 

$67,106.83 



76 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in San Francisco, Cal. 
[Organized or Incorporated, May 13, 1863.] 

DAVID J. STAPLES, President. , Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. B. BOWEKS, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300 000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Eeal estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $165,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 146,761.10 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 874.69 

Value of lands mortgaged $273,650.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 98,400.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $372,050.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



United States 5-20 bonds 

United States 6 per cent, bonds. 
Virginia State 6 per cent, bonds. 

Total par and market value. 



Par 


Market 




Value. 


Value. 




$10,000.00 


$10,120.55 




100,000.00 


103,183.48 




39,900,00 


17,809.43 




$149,900.00 


$131,113.46 


$131,113.46 



Tjoans on Collaterals. 



Merchants Mutual Marine Insurance Co. stock. 

California Bank stock 

Endorsement of Lafayette Story 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . 



Par 
Value. 


Market 
Value. 


Amount 
loaned. 


§5,000 
30,000 


S5,000 
39,760 


$5,000 

10,000 

500 



S35.O0O §44,750 S15.500 



115,500.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging- to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value. 



15,616.04 

25,874.32 

3.300.00 






COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 77 

Gross premiums in due course of collection $22,513.43 

Bills receivable, not matured, taken for fire, marine and inland risks 10,000.95 

All other property belonging to the Company. 82,667.49 

Aggregate amount of the assets of the company stated at their actual value. $619,221.48 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid. $1 1,490.50 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 54,000.00 

Losses resisted, including interest and other expenses thereon 4,500.00 

Total amount of claims for losses $69,990.50 

Deduct re-insurance thereon 17,579.36 

Net amount of unpaid losses $52,41 1.14 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $158,072 08 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 12,255.75 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks 8,280.70 

Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 13,206.21 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $191,814.74 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 225.50 

Due and to become due for borrowed money 78,750.00 

All other demands against the Company 1 ,599.35 

Total liabilities, except stock and net surplus $324,800 73 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus $624,800.73 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Net premiums received in cash $426,755.06 $66,133.35 

Net cash received on bills, &c., for premiums.. . . 13,098.10 

Gross cash received for premiums $426,755.06 $79,231.45 

Deduct reinsurance and return premiums . . 15,805 16 13,513.15 

Net cash actually received for premiums $410,949.90 $65,718.30 $476,668.20 

Bills and notes received for premiums remaining unpaid $10,000.95 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages $33,095.85 

Received from all other sources 16,453.82 



Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash $526,217.87 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross amount actuallv paid for losses $477,574.73 $47,719.37 

Deduct salvages " 11,851.19 14,251.21 

Net amount paid for losses $465,723.54 $33,468.16 $499,191.70 



78 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Paid ov allowed for commissions or brokerage «68 36° 45 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks and other employes 34*047.40 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes g 73- oj 

All other payments and expenditures 62091 03 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $670,429.89 



FRANKLIN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Pa. 

[Organized or Incorporated, April 22, 1829.] 

ALFRED G. BAKER, President. THEODORE M. REGER, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, J. W. SMITH, Waterbury. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized 8400,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 400 000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $65,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 2 589 684.28 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgages 42,838.66 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $2,511,996.88) . . $5,811,276.67 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



U. S. bonds, 1881 

U. S. bonds, 10-40's 

Penna. State bonds, 5-1 0's 

American Steamship Co. bonds 

Alabama State bonds 

City of Pittsburg 7's, bonds 

Mississippi State warrants 

Commercial National Bank stock 

Bank of Kentucky stock 

Franklin Fire Insurance Co. stock 

Insurance Co. of North America stock. 
Continental Hotel Co., p'f \1 stock 

Total par and market value 



Par 


Market 


Value. 


Value. 


$5,000.00 


$5,731.25 


40,000.00 


43,650.00 


5,000.00 


5,150.00 


10,000.00 


8,000.00 


10,000.00 


6,900.00 


5,000.00 


5,050.00 


15,000.00 


12,750.00 


5,000.00 


6,200.00 


20,000.00 


20,400.00 


9,100.00 


40,950.00 


1,500.00 


3,750.00 


1,600.00 


1,472.00 


127,200.00 


160,003.25 $160,003.25 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



79 



Franklin Fire Insurance Co. stock. 



Penna. R. R. Co. stock 

V. S. 5-20 bonds 

Franklin Fire Ins. Co. stock 

Commercial National Bank stock 

Franklin Fire Ins. Co. stock 

Camden & Amboy R. R. Co. stock. .. 

Franklin Fire Ins. Co. stock 

Delaware & Karitan Canal Co. stock. 

Franklin Fire Ins. Co. stock 

Penna. R. R. Co. stock 

Franklin Fire Ins. Co. stock 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 
Value. 

§400 

4,500 

1,000 

1,800 

1,000 

300 

250 

800 

7,000 

200 

1,000 

6C0 

850 

100 



Market 

Value. 

$1,800 

20.250 

4,500 

2,052 

1,130 

1,350 1 

310 J 

3,600 

8,470 

900 ) 
1,210 J 
2,700 
1,054 
450 
1,350 



Amount 
Loaned. 
$200 
4,500 
1,000 
950 
1,000 

1,450 

2,500 
1,500 

1,500 

2,500 
400 
350 
900 



Total par and market value and amount loaned $20,100 $51,126 818 750 



All other loans, with U. S. bonds as collateral.. 

Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging- to the company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the company 

'regate amount of assets of the company stated at their actual 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $125 g21 3Q 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 233,100.00 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs and expenses thereon . . . 6^500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses 

Ke-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 percent ' ' $556,81 0.59 
Ke-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 31 6,'320.58 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks. . . .777 
Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies'. .'.' .'.' .'.'"' 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 

Due and to become due for borrowed money 

All other demands against the company 

Total liabilities except capital stock 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital stock and net surplus " 



$18,750.00 

110,000.00 
1,284.17 

149,824.25 

1,030.00 

594.83 

221,792.72 
2,869.00 



value... $3,363,671.16 



$365,421.30 



873,131.17 

1,290,499.34 

120.00 

96,879.00 

12,939.75 

$2,638,990.56 
400,000.00 
324,680.60 

$3,363,671.16 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross cash received for premiums 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums. 

Net cash received for premiums 



1,691,773.88 
145,336.97 



$1,546,436.91 



80 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages $106,029.88 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks, bonds, and from all other sources. 35,538.99 

Received from all other sources 3,036.00 

Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks „ $156,011.84 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $1,751,941.78 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE TEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $1,051,721.60 

Cash dividends actually paid 130,576.00 

Paid for commissions or brokerage 202,694.78 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 184,395.28 

Pakl for state, national, and local taxes 41,503.69 

All other payments and expenditures 68,867.34 

Deposit premium returned on perpetual fire risks $38,945.41 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $1,679, 75S. 69 



GERMAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Erie, Penn. 

[Organized or Incorporated February, 1867.] 

M. SCHLANDECKER, President. J. EICHENLAUB, Jr., Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid op in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $157,939.75 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loans 9,529. 18 

Value of the lands mortgaged $388,700.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $28,400.00) 98,300.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $487,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

City of Eric bonds $22,000.00 $22,000.00 

Total par and market value $22,000.00 $22,000.00 $22,000.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 
Loaned on Collaterals. 



German Savings Institution stock .* $5,000 

Erie Water bonds 

Conneautville Borough bonds 



81 



Par 

Val ue. 


Market 
Value. 


Amount 
Loaned. 


§5,000 
15,000 
2,000 


$5,000 
15,000 
2,050 


§2,500 
10,000 
2,000 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . $22,000 $22,050 $14,500 $14,500.00 

All other loans, on judgment notes 3,280.00 

Cash in Company's principal office : 529.13 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 103,000.00 

Interest accrued on stock not included in " market value" 720.00 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 1,014.00 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 36,670.40 

Bills receivable, not matured 24.50 

All other property belonging to the Company 4,689.21 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value $353,896.17 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $33,750.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses.... $15,339.72 

Gross amount of claims for losses $49,089.72 

Deduct rc-insurance. 4,000.00 



Net amount of unpaid losses 45,089.72 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $91,112.20 

Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year. . 11,250.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 102,362.20 

Brokerage and other charges 5,500.00 

Total liabilities, except stock $152,951.92 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 944.25 



Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $353,896.17 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $313,465.62 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 39,787.37 

Net cash actually received for premiums $273,678.25 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 5,408.69 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources 487.15 

Income received from all other sources 1,210.00 



Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $280,784.09 

11 



32 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid for losses $76,743.80 

Cash dividends actually paid 20,07 1 .02 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 47,258.78 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 3,168.18 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 5,490.56 

All other payments and expenditures 11 ,238.81 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash $163,971.10 



GERMAN AMERICAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 
[Incorporated March, 1872.] 
WILLIAM F. HEINS, President. JOHN W. MURRAY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, EGBERT MARSH, Bridgeport. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $1 ,000,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash, 1 ,000,000.00 



II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company 

Par 

value. 

U. S. 6 per cent, bonds of 1881 $50,000.00 

U. S. 6 per cent. 5-20 bonds of 1865 100,000.00 

U. S. 6 per cent. 5^20 bonds of 1 867 500,000.00 

U. S. 6 per cent, currency bonds 200,000.00 

Total par and market value $850,000.00 

Loans on collaterals. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

City of Poughkeepsie bonds $22,000 $22,000 

U.S. 5-20 coupon bonds, 1865 10,000 11,300 

Buffalo City 7 per cent, bonds 15,000 15,000 

U. S. 5-20 coupon bonds, 1867 5,000 6,650 

" " " " " 3,000 3,390 

" " " " 1865 2,000 2,260 

" " " " 1867 1,000 1,130 

N. Y. County Court Home bonds 8,000 8,000 

U. S. 10-40 coupon bonds 5,000 5,650 



Market 
value. 

$57,250.00 

113,000.00 

577,150.00 

226,000.00 

$973,400.00 $973,400.00 



Amount 
loaued. 
$20,000 

25,000 

5,000 

6,000 

600 
7,000 
5,000 






COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 83 



U. S. 5-20 coupon bonds, 1867 and 1S6S 10,000 11 ,300 10.000 

Buffalo City bonds 46,000 46,000 \ 

Brooklyn Bridge bonds 1,000 1,000 > 44.000 

Brooklyn Permanent Water Loan bonds 4,000 4,000 ) 

U. S. registered bonds, 1S6S 30,000 33.900 | „ _„ 

N. Y. State Canal Loan 20,000 21,400 J 

C. S. coupon bonds, 1864 and 1S65 20,000 22,600 20.000 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, 1861, '62, '64, '65, '67 15,250 18,362.50 15.250 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, 1867 32,000 36,160 32,000 

U. S. 10-40 bonds 5,000 5,550 5,000 

Total par and market value and amount loaned 8254,250 $274,552.50 8243,850 8243,850.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 2,085.10 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 38,757.25 

Premiums in due course of collection 110,99S.12 

All other property belonging to the Company 10,000.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value.. $1,379,090.47 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses $59,336.87 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $253,623.57 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . 29,331.24 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 282,954.81 

Total liabilities, except stock 5342,291.68 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,U00.00 

Surplus beyond capital 36,798.79 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus §1 379,090.47 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $557,417.02 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 37,068.60 

Net cash received for premiums $520,348.42 

Interest and dividends received from all sources 65,786.60 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $586,135.02 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses S177.915.86 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 4,151.69 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $173,764.17 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 83,205.23 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 31,514.58 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 7 617.28 

All other payments and expenditures 46 335.17 

A a _ :egate expenditures during the year in cash $342,436.43 



84 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



GERMANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Nkw York, N. Y. 

[Organized or Incorporated, March, 1859.] 

RUD. GARRIGUE, President. HUGO SCHUMANN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. C. KIMBALL, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized. 
Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 



$500,000.00 
500,000.00 



II. ASSETS. 



Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered 

Loans on bond and mortgage 

Interest due on said bond and mortgage loans 

Value of lands mortgaged 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for S494,850.00). 



$545,000.00 
664,200.00 



Total value of mortgaged premises $1,209,200.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



U. S. registered bonds, '62s. 
National Park Bank stock. . 

Neptune Ins. Co. stock 

South Carolina bonds 



Total par and market value. 



$49,365.95 

494,900.00 

9,055.95 



Par 


Market 




Value. 


Value. 




$400,000.00 


$451,500.00 




5,000.00 


7,500.00 




2,000.00 


100.00 




20,000.00 


16,000.00 




$427,000 00 


$475,100.00 


$475,100.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

Value. 



-Market 

Value. 

§13,000 

1,545 

1,200 

560 \ 

Total par and market value and amount loaned §14,100 $16 305 



State Bank of Elizabeth, N. J., stock 

Ninth National Bank of New York stock. 

U. S. Express Co. stock 

Western Union Telegraph Co. stock 



$10,400' 

1,500 

1,500 

700 



Amount 

Loaned. 

810,000 

750 

1,500 
$12,250 



§12,260.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 85 

Cash in the Company's principal office 827,767.60 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 139,365.94 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 5.30 

Gross Premiums in due course of collection 86,721.63 

Bills receivable, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 4,353. 1 1 

All other property belonging to the Company 14,491.98 

Aggregate amount of Assets stated at their actual value $1,313,377.46 



in. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $118,980.91 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 150,964.29 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 1 1 ,76 1 .27 

Gross amount of claims for losses $281,706.47 

Deduct re-insurance thereon 3,264.85 

Net amount of unpaid losses $278,441.62 

Re-insurance upon fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $370,673.62 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . . 78,732.99 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $449,406.61 

All other demands against the company 10,276.21 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $738,124.44 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 500,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 75,253.02 

Aggregate amount of all liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. $1,313,377.46 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $905,997.45 $1,151.59 

Deduct re-insurance, and return premiums 68,730.06 

Net cash received for premiums $837,267.39 $1,151.59 $838,418.98 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 28,116.27 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. $36,264.30 

Received from all other sources 18,595.36 

Received for calls on capital ■ $250,000.00 

Aggregate amount received during the year in cash $921 ,394.91 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $553,489.80 $3,730.46 

Deduct amounts received for salvages, &c 10,428.66 91.84 

Net amount paid during the year for losses. ... $543,061.14 $3,638.62 $546,699.76 



86 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Cash dividends actually paid 550,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 123,212.04 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 53,454.91 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 19,017.52 

All other payments and expenditures 118,941.60 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash $91 1 ,325.83 



GIRARD FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Pa. 

[Organized or Incorporated, March, 1853.] 

THOS. CRAVEN, President. JAMES B. ALVORD, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, RALPH GILLETT, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by Company, unincumbered $1 83,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, not more than one year's interest due 121,900.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, more than one year's interest due . . 2,950.00 

Interest due and accrued on said bond and mortgage loans 2,275.83 

Value of lands mortgaged $89,500.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $91,850.00) 240,500.00 

Total value of said mortgaged premises $330,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by tlw. Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

United States 5-20 bonds $17,100.00 $19,494.00 

United States 5 per cent, bonds 55,000.00 61,600.00 

City of Philadelphia 6 per cent, bonds 7,800.00 7,764.00 

State of Pennsylvania 6 per cent, bonds 3,000.00 3,090.00 

Penna. R. R. Co. 1st mortgage bonds 28,000.00 28,000.00 

Penna. R. R. Co. 2d mortgage bonds 5,000.00 4,900.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



87 



Penna. R. R. Co. general mortgage bonds 

Lehigh Navigation Co. 6 per cent, loan 

Camden & Amboy R. R. Co. 6 p. et. bonds, 1883.. 
Camden & Amboy R. R. Co. 6 p et. moit. loan. . 

Union Pacific R. R. Co. 6 per cent, bonds 

American Steamship Co. 6 per cent, bonds 

Danville, Wilkes. & Hazelton R. R. Co. 7 p. c. b's.. 
Lackawanna & Bloomsburgh R. R.Co. 7 p. c. b'ds 

Susquehanna Coal Co. 6 per cent, bonds 

Phila. & Reading R. R. Co. stock 

City of Philadelphia 6 per cent, warrants 

Girard Fire & Marine Ins. Co. stock 

Phila. & Reading R. R. Co. 7 per cent. conv. loan. 

Total par and market value 



$10,000.00 

11,000.00 

4,000.00 

6,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 

20,000.00 

5,058.95 

4,000.00 

5,000.00 



$9,600.00 
10,230.00 
3,640.00 
5,640.00 
4,550.00 
5,000.00 
9,500.00 
1,000.00 
3,000.00 
23,600.00 
5,058.95 
4,600.00 
5,075.00 



$204,958.95 $215,341.95 $215,341.95 



Loans on Collaterals. 



United States 5-20 bonds 

Girard Fire and Marine Insurance Co. 
N. Penna. R. R. Co. 6 per cent, bonds. 



Par 


Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$6,000 


§7,020 


$6,000 


6,000 


6,900 


2,400 


1,000 


1,000 


750 



Total par and market value and amount loaned. 



$13,000 $14,920 $9,150 



ft 1,52 1.00 



Loans on personal security 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Furniture and fixtures of company's office 

Amount deposited for perpetual insurance on company's building 

Furniture, fixtures and franchises of Quaker City Bank 

All other property belonging to the company 

Gross amount of all the assets of the company 

Amount to be deducted from assets on account of bad and doubtful debts. , 



$9,150.00 



894 20 

49,180.56 

272.12 

54,329.72 

3,000.00 

1,500.00 

7,500.00 

558.58 



Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value. 



$651,852.96 
52.67 

$651,800.29 



III. LIABILITIES. 



$11,900.00 
2,000 00 



Gross claims for losses 

Deduct salvage claims thereon 

Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $149,551.42 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . 48,322.62 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 

All other demands against the company 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and surplus 



$9,900.00 



$197,874.04 

800.00 

10,485.76 

$219,059.80 
300,000.00 
132,740.49 

$651,800.29 



88 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $373,392.33 

Deduct reinsurance, rebate, and return premiums 8,796.33 

Net cash actually received for premiums §364,596.00 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 7,013.75 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, stock loans, &c 14,767 39 

Income received from all other soiwces 6,935.09 

Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks $5,663.32 

Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash $393,312.23 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses $160,081 .28 

Deduct amounts received for re-insurance in other companies.. . . 5,975.00 

Net amount paid during the year for losses §154,106 28 

Cash dividends actually paid ' 30,000.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 50,259.46 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 14,164.31 

Paid for state, national and local taxes 14,874.96 

All other payments and expenditures 42,908.53 

Amount of deposit premium returned on perpetual fire risks . . . $2,725.20 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $306,313.54 



GLEN'S FALLS FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 



Located in Glen's Falls, N. Y. 

[Incorporated, 1849.] 

RUSSELL M. LITTLE, President. JOHN L. CUNNINGHAM, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, S. Y. St. JOHN, New Canaan. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized §200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $9,500.00 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) 140,968.88 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 1,759.36 

Value of lands mortgaged $187,600.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $80,200) 225,700.00 

Value of mortgaged premises $413,300.00 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



89 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



Par 
Value. 



United States 5-20 bonds, registered - $307,700.00 

N. York Bounty Loan, registered 3,000.00 

First National Bank stock, Glens's Falls 10,000.00 

Total par and market value $320,700.00 $364,634.50 $364,634.50 



Market 
Value. 

$346,484.50 

3,150.00 

15,000.00 



Office furniture, etc 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank. 
Net premiums in due course of collection 

Gross amount of assets of the Company 

Deduct on account of bad or doubtful debts 



Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value. 



2,725.00 

7,816.73 

41,735.01 

18,995.69 

$588,135.17 
925.00 

$587,210.17 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses. . . . 



$4,231.64 
21,197.36 
11,300.00 



Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less. . $57,871.44 
Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year 234,953.02 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Total liabilities except capital stock 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 



Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus. 



$36,729.00 



$292,824.46 

$329,553.46 

$200,000.00 

57,656.71 

$587,210.17 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash $271,184.14 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 1 5,201 .42 

Net cash actually received for premiums 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 
Income received from all other sources ■ 

Aggregate amount of income actually received during the year in cash, 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid for losses 

Cash dividends actually paid 

Paid or allowed for commissions and brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes . 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 






Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash . 

12 



$255,982.72 

10,509.65 

23,962.81 

797.91 

$291,253.09 



$194,323.34 
20,000.00 
44,105.40 
10,434.98 
4,155.11 
12,294.60 

$285,313.43 



90 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HANOVER FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 

[Incorporated, April, 1852.] 

BENJAMIN S. WALCOTT, President. I. KEMSEN LANE, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, WILLIAM WALLACE, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $250,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered S2.725.95 

Loans on bond and mortgage 147,700.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 1,556.34 

Value of the lands mortgaged $130,000.00 

Value of buildings, (insured for $156,000.00) 294,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $424,000.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 
Value. 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1867 $320,000.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1865 15,000.00 

United States 6s registered bonds, 1881 20,000.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1864 10,000.00 

United States 5-20 coupon bonds, 1865 15,000.00 

United States 6 per cent, currency bonds 20,000.00 

N. Y. County bonds 11,000.00 

Tennessee bonds 13,000.00 

Virginia consolidated bonds 21,800.00 

Virginia deferred bonds 10,900.00 

City of New York assessment bonds 25,000.00 

Total par and market value $481 ,700.00 



Market 
Value. 

$363,200.00 

16,987.50 

22,875.00 

11,275.00 

16,950.00 

22,600.00 

11,000.00 

10,383.75 

12,099.00 

1,744.00 

25,000.00 

$514,114.25 $514,114.25 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

German American Bank stock $5,000 $5,100 

Metropolitan National Bank stock 20,000 26,000 

United States G per cent, coupon bonds, 1881 5,000 5,731.25 

United States 10-40 coupon bonds 4,000 4,390 j 

United States 5-20 coupon bonds, 1865 1,000 1,130 / 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon $35,000 $42,351.25 



Amount 
loaned. 

$4,500 

20,000 

6,000 

5,000 



$34,500 



$34,500.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 91 

Cash in the Company's principal office $27,194.75 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 31,947.24 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 7,164.66 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 857.42 

Net premiums in due course of collection 97,976.28 

Bills receivable taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 4,353.1 1 

All other property belonging to the Company 16,450.40 

Aggregate amount of assets $886,540.40 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $39,747.27 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 121,557.39 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 8,337.43 

Gross amount of claims for losses $169,642.09 

Deduct reinsurance and salvages 3,264.85 

Net amount of unpaid lossses $166,377.24 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, of prem. on fire risks under one year. $347,697.80 
Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks more than one year 108,291 .87 



Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 455,989.67 

Total liabilities, except capital stock $622,366.91 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 14,173.49 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $886,540.40 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $878,335.59 $1,151.59 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums, 77,244.82 

Net cash received for premiums $801,090.77 $1,151.59 $802,242.36 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 7,764.99 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources.. 41,096.57 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $851,103.92 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $529,737.72 $3,730.47 

Deduct re-insurance and salvages 15,636.17 91.21 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $514,101.55 $3,639.26 $517,740.81 



Cash dividends actually paid 40,000.00 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 117,609.78 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 46,045.01 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 20,196.10 

All other payments and expenditures, viz : rent, traveling expenses, &c 98,047.17 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $839,638.87 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HOFFMAN FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New Yokk City. 
[Organized or Incorporated, May, 1864.] 
MARCUS F. HODGES, President. OLIVER A. DRAKE, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, SILAS CHAPMAN, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash $200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage $166,750.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 5,242.68 

Value of the land mortgaged $162,500.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $108,500 as collateral), 155,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $317,500.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. ■ 

Par Market 

Value. A'alue. 

United States 5-20 coupon bonds, 1865 $10,000.00 $11,600.00 

United States 6 per cent, registered bonds, 1881... 10,000.00 11,600.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1867 35,000.00 40,600.00 

Total par and market value $55,000.00 $63,800.00 $63,800.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 874.81 

Cash-belonging to the Company deposited in bank 481.29 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 48,706.34 

All other property belonging to the Company 2,500.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. $288,355.12 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $11,223.90 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . . 78,460.12 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, find other expenses 3,600.00 

'Net amount of unpaid losses $93,284.02 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year $91,655.91 

Reinsurance pro rata on lire risks running more than one year.. . ■ 4,458.70 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks $96,114.61 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



93 



Due and accrued for salaries, advertising, and other expenses $1,000.00 

Due agents and brokers on premiums, and return premiums 2,214.31 

Total amount of all liabilities, except capital stock $192,612.94 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital §392,612.94 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $218,254.02 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 18,074.19 

Net cash received for premiums $200,179.83 

ft OftS 7*} 
Received for interest on bonds and mortgages °'"° 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources, 4,249.95 

Received for calls on capital $100,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $21 2, o 13JU 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $177,332.15 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 150.71 

Net amount paid for losses $1 77,181.44 

Cash dividends actually paid 20,050.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 31,116.17 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c, 19,465.61 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 5,954.21 

All other payments and expenditures 19,002.89 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $272 ,770.32 



HOME FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 
/ / 



Located in New York City. 

[Incorporated, April, 1853.] 

CHARLES J. MARTIN, President. JOHN H. WASHBURN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, W. E. BAKER, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized $2,500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 2,500,000.00 



94 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) ,,„,„..,.. 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans. i«v!« 

Value of the lands mortgaged * . / ' ££££ 48 ' 364 - 6? 

value ot buildings mortgaged (insured for $1,542,260) 2,551,100.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $4,963,600.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par JIarket 

TT .. , „ , Value. Value 

United States bonds, 6s of 1881 $164,000.00 $186,780.00 

Limed States currency bonds, 6s 150,000.00 169,875 00 

United States 5-20 bonds of 1 864 750)0 00.00 847 500.00 

United States 5-20 bonds of 1865, new stock 436,000.00 491 590 00 

Tennessee bonds, old stock 20)000 00 ' Q 

AlabaYna bonds 10;00000 q 

South Carolina bonds, old stock 6)000 . 00 312000 

newstock 14,000.00 3,'l 50.00* 

Total par and market value ^ioO^oTo $7^25^0 $1,725,965.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 
Value. 

Manufacturers and Merchants Bank stock $10 000 

Metropolitan National Bank stock 5*000 

Central National BaDk stock 5 qoo 

Continental National Bank stock l'ooo 

Central National Bank stock 40Q0 

St. Nicholas National Bank stock 2 000 

New York and New Haven R R. Co. stock 3100 

St. Nicholas National Bank stock 1 500 

Excelsior Life Ins. Co. stock 3 qoo 

Second National Bank stock 10 000 

Metropolitan National Bank stock 5 QOO 

Bquitable Life Ins. Co. stock 13 000 

Universal Life Ins. Co. stock 19 500 

Metropolitan Gas Light bonds 3 qoo 

Excelsior Life lus. Co stock 5 qqq 

New York National Exchange Bank stock 500 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1862 g00 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1865 500 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1867 1,100 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1868 ' 6 0o 

" " 6-20 bonds, 1865 5 000 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1S62 ' 6 ' 000 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1804 35O0 

" " 5-20 bonds, 1865 5*000 

" " '6 per cent bonds, 1881 3 000 

Total par and market value and amount loaned $115 100 



Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$10,000 


89,000 


6,650 
4,800 


| 10,000 


900 


750 


3,840 


3,600 


2,300 


2,000 


4,309 
1,725 


1 5,000 


3,000 


1,600 


19,500 
6,650 


1 15,000 


18,200 


13,000 


19,500 


11,700 


3,000 


500 


5,000 


3,500 


500 


■150 


904 


) 






1,243 


[ 3,000- 


678 


1 


5,650 
5,650 


1 10,000 


3,955 


) 


5.650 


J. 5,023.4! 


3,390 


J 



§137,559 $01,123.49 $94,123,49 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 95 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank '••• $204,233.61 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 4,370.66 

Net premiums in due course of collection 290,484.48 

Bills receivable, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 17,126.83 

All other properly belonging to the Company 114,656.83 

Aggregate amount of all assets $4,410,090.57 

III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . $565,039.20 
Losses resisted, interest, costs, and expenses thereon 32,899.99 

Gross amount of claims for losses $597,939.1 9 

Deduct re-insurance 10,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $5S7,939.19 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less, $1,014,076.00 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . 672,168.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $1,686,244.00 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 2,975.00 

Total amount of liabilities, except capital .' $2,277,158.19 

Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash 2,500,000.00 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including capital $4,777,158.19 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $3,371,860.39 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 229.554,06 

Net cash received for premiums $3,142,306.33 

Bills and notes received for premiums $3,628.66 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 1 29,864.01 

Received for interest and dividends on bonds, stocks, and from all other sources. 123,525.78 

Income received from all other sources 5,998.32 

Aggregate Income received during the year in cash $3,401 ,694.44 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $2,766,432.35 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 183,700.47 

Net amount paid for losses $2,582,731 .88 

Cash dividends actually paid 122,435.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 478,844.91 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 200,750.51 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 66,207.22 

All other payments and expenditures 203,796.45 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year $3,654,765.97 



96 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HOME INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Columbus, 0. 

[Organized or Incorporated, July, 1863.] 

M. A. DOUGHERTY, President. JACOB PEETREY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, JUDAH FRISBIE, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $250,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Beal estate owned by company, unincumbered 1 .727. SO 

Loans on bond and mortgage on which not more than one year's interest is due. 342.592.36 

Loans on bond and mortgage on which more than one year's interest is due 30,040.23 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 22,759.06 

$970,758.00 



Stocks and bonds owned by the Company. 



U. S. 10 40 bonds 

U. S. 5-20 bonds 

Columbus City Hall bonds 

Fayette county, O., bonds 

Total par and market value 



Par 


Market 


Talue. 


Value. 


$45,000.00 


$49,386.66 


5,000.00 


5,818.75 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


S5 7,000. 00 


$62,205.41 



$62,205.41 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

Talue. Value. Loaned. 

Madison National Bank stock, London, 812,300.00 $15,000 00 $12,300.00 

l'iqua City bonds, I'iqua.0 8,000.00 10,000.00 8,000.00 

Highland County bonds 1,320.00 1,500.00 1,320.00 

United States 5-20 bonds 11,103.10 15,000.00 11,103.10 

Total par and market Talue and amount loaned. . . S32.723.10 $41,500.00 982,723.10 

All other loans 

Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company de] in bank 



$32,723.10 

8,272.20 

3,060.72 

22,215.26 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



97 



Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value $174.96 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, taken for tire, marine and inland risks 20,219.18 

All other property belonging to the company ' ' 



171,920.64 



Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value $769,488.36 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid. $62,974.56 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 45,000.00 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs and other expenses 40,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $147,974.56 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less; $191,042 09 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 139,723.59 
Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $330,765.68 

Total liabilities, except stock and net surplus $478,740.24 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash , 250,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 40,748.12 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus $769,488.36 






IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash $567,848.02 

Gross cash receive^ on bills and notes taken for premiums 5,265.68 

Gross cash received for premiums $573,1 13.70 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 13,650.17 

Net cash received for premiums . . . ; $559,463.53 

Bills and notes received for premiums remaining unpaid $20,219.18 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages $34,803.27 

Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash $594,266.80 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses $595,106.28 

Deduct amounts received for re-insurance in other companies. . . 13,200.19 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $581,906.09 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 92,696.76 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks and other employes 52,478.82 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 13,747.86 

All other payments and expenditures 29,921.11 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $770,750.64 

13 



98 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HOWARD INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York, N. Y. 

[Organized or Incorporated, March, 1825.] 

SAMUEL T. SKIDMORE, President. THEODORE KEELRR, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, EGBERT MARSH, Bridgeport. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash ■ 500,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $125,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 63,900.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgages 1,064.19 

Value of lands mortgaged $156,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $30,500.00) 77,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $233,000.00 



United States 5 per cent, bonds, 1874 

United States 6 per cent, bonds, 1881 

United States 6 per cent, bonds, 1896 

New York State 7 per cent, bonds, 1877 

New York State 6 per cent, bonds, 1873 (gold). . 
New York City 6 per cent, bonds, 1887 and 1878 

New York City 7 per cent, bonds, 1875 

New York County 6 per cent, bonds, 1888 & 1889 

Kings County 6 per cent, bonds, 1883 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. 1st mort. bands. 
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. 1st mort. bonds. 
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. 1st mort. bonds. 

Metropolitan National Bank stock 

Phenix National Bank stock 

American Exchange National Bank 

Total par and market value 



ned by the Company. 




Par 


Market 


Value. 


Value. 


$60,000.00 


$66,600.00 


25,000.00 


29,000.00 


100,000.00 


115,000.00 


5,000.00 


5,400.00 


5,000.00 


5,550.00 


20,000.00 


20,600.00 


5,000.00 


5,100.00 


5,000.00 


' 5,200.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


7,000.00 


7,700.00 


35,000.00 


37,100.00 


15,000.00 


15,900.00 


10,000.00 


13,600.00 


5,000.00 


5,200.00 


14,700.00 


16,858.00 


336,700.00 


373,808.00 $373,808.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



99 



United States 6 per cent, bonds. 1S64 

Total par and market value and amount loaned., 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 
Value. 
' $1,000 



SI, 000 



Market Amount 

Talue. Loaned. 

$1,120 SI ,000 



81,120 



Sl.llMi. 



Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging- to the company 

Aggregate amount of assets of the company stated at their actual value. 



81,000.00 

1,662.06 
H,778.92 

3,711.21 

35.00 

16,887.87 

7,116.67 



$603,963.92 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 
Losses resisted, including interest, costs and expenses thereon. . . 

Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 
Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks. . . 
All other demands against the company *. 

Total liabilities except capital stock 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 



4,633.06 
1,000.00 



890,209.48 

9,619.81 

400.00 



Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital stock and net surplus. 



$5,633.06 



100 



229.29 
56.63 



$105 

500 

3 



918.98 
000.00 
,044.94 



8608,963.92 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 






Gross cash received for premiums 

Deduct reinsurance and return premiums. 

Net cash actually received for premiums. . , 



Fire. 
$247,903.05 
16,086.67 

$231,816.38 



Marine and Inland. 
$1,136.00 

$1,136.00 $232,952.38 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks, bonds, and from all other sources. 
Received from all other sources 



Aggregate income received during the vear in cash. 



5,637.13 

22,465.02 

5,200.00 

8266,254.53 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid for losses 

Paid for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash. 



$263,856.59 
25,636.21 
23,668.43 
11,394.72 
17,267.30 

$341,823 25 



100 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



HUMBOLDT FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Newark, N. J. 
[Organized or Incorporated March, 1870.] 
GEORGE BROWN, President. ELMER F. HIGGINS, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, WILLIAM WALLACE, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 1 50,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $117,675.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 4,092.29 

Value of lands mortgaged $302,300.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 123,400.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $425,700.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office 3,249.15 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 50,386.25 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 14,090.63 

All other property belonging to the Company 1 ,500.00 

Aggregate assets stated at their actual value $190,993.32 

ID. LIABILITIES. 

Losses against the Company, adjusted and unpaid $4,916.12 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 4,400.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $9,316.12 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less 35,154.37 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 225.00 

All other demands against the Company 1,409.00 

Total liabilities, except stock $46,104.49 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 150,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $196,104.49 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



101 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $73,319.83 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium 4,202.09 

Net cash received for premiums 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Received for increased capital $50,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash 

Vi EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses 

Cash dividends actually paid 

Assessment returned to stockholders 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Paid for salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, etc 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures including taxes 

Aggregate amount of expenditures 



$69,117.74 
6,862.86 

$75,980.60 



$16,880.13 

3,255.00 

10,000.00 

10,247.30 

2,560.00 

407.88 

5,093.20 

$48,443.51 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH AMERICA. 



Located in Philadelphia, Penn. 

[Organized or Incorporated, 1794.] 

ARTHUR G. COFFIN, President. MATTHIAS MARIS, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. C. KIMBALL, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $35,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 878,250.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 10,094.17 



102 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



United States registered bonds $1 00 



Par Market 

value. value. 



5 " 20 bonds 100,000.00 



,000 00 $112,000.00 
115,000.00 



: 30,000.00 34,050.00 

„ " " 70,000.00 79.450.00 

1 ennsylvama State 5|s 10,000.00 10,000.00 

^ T " 6>s 80,000.00 85,400.00 

New Jersey State 6's 50,000.00 51,500.t)0 

Delaware State 6's 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Connecticut State 6's 78,000.00 78,000.00 

Philadelphia City 6's 135,000.00 1 35,000.00 

Cincinnati City bonds * 21,000.00 18,900.00 

„, ", " ' 19,000.00 19,760.00 

Cleveland City bonds 25,000.00 23,750.00 

Wilhamsport Ci y bonds 3,000.00 2 430 00 

Dayton City bonds 15,000.00 15,300.00 

Pittsburgh City bonds 15,000.00 15,525 00 

Columbus City bonds 6,000.00 5,400.00 

Bellefonte Borough bonds 15,000.00 15,450.00 

North Penna. R. R. Co. bonds 27,384.00 26,934.00 

7 per cent, coupon 5,000.00 4,750.00 

Amer. S. S. Co. bonds, guar'd by Penna. R. R. Co. 40,000.00 32 000.00 

Penna. & N. Y. Canal & R. R. Co. bonds 30,000-00 28^500.00 

Del. R.R. Co. m't loan, guar, by P., W. & Bal.R.R.Co. 10,000.00 g^OO-OO 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Go. mortgaged bonds 50,000.00 47,'500.00 

7 per cent, coupon bonds 25,000.00 25,875.00 

Western Penna. Co. 1st mortgage bonds 1 5,000.00 12,000.00 

Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. 1st mortgage loan 25,000.00 22 000.00 

con ' Ioan 6,000.00 5,400.00 

gold loan 10,000.00 9,000.00 

Philadelphia & Reading 7 per cent bonds 100,000.00 102,700.00 

Delaware & R., & C. & A. R. R. & T. Co 21,000 00 20,140.00 

Schuylkill Navigation Co. con. mortgage loan. . . 10,000.00 7,600.00 

Ches. & Del. Canal con. mortgage loan 37,000.00 33*300.00 

Del. Division Canal con. mortgage loan 15,000.00 13,800.00 

Union Canal mortgage loan 5,000.00 500.00 

Philada., German'n & Norris R. R. Co. stock. . . 15,000.00 25,500.00 

16,400.00 
1,260.00 
8,664.00 
5,500.00 
2,400.00 



Philadelphia National Bank stock 10 000.00 

Ger. & Perkiomcn Turnpike Co. stock 3,150.00 

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal Co. stock 11,400.00 

North Penna. R. R. Co. stock 5,500.00 

Philada. & Southern Mail S. S. Co. stock 5,000.00 



Total par and market value $l,263^43lu0 $1,288,438.00 $1,288,438.00 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



103 



Loans on Collaterals. 

par Market Amount 

Value. Value. loaned. 

Ins. Co. of North America stock Sl,250 $3,125 $2,000 

Empire Trans. Co. stock J „ „. 

Cumberland F. & I. Co. stock ' ' 

Notes 6,339.18 6,339.18 5,000 

Note 1,000 1,000 1,000 

Penna.K.R. Co. stock 3,000 3,480 I 

Ins. Co. of North America stock 5,000 12,500 ) ' 

Note 10,000 10,000 7,895.23 

Lehigh C. & N. Co. stock 7,000 6,440 5,000 

Ins. Co. of North America stock 560 1,400 I 

Columbia bonds 1,000 1,050 J 2 > 500 

Notes 16,045.14 16,045 14 8,000 

Check 100 100 100 

Note 15,352.99 15,352.99 11,000 

Total par and market value and amount loaned 866,647. 31 76,832.31 $53,695 23 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

•Premiums in course of transmission 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, taken for fire marine and inland risks 

Premium on gold, and balances due company 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . . 



$53^5.23 



177,115.19 
154,677.11 
276.00 
196,660.13 
458,035.07 
24,498.01 

$3,276,738.91 






III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . $771,967.91 
Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 13,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $784,967.91 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $770,142.03 

Rc-insurance pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year 135,906.23 

Re-insurance on marine risks 439,614.69 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks $1,345,662.95 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies 312,878.94 

Dividends remaining unpaid 2,500.00 

Liahilities, except capital $2,446,009.80 

Capital stock paid up in cash 500,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital _ 330,729.11 

Liahilities, including capital stock and net surplus $3,276,738.91 



104 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAE. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $1,947,041.21 $1,049,308.77 

Received on bills and notes taken for premiums.. 526,446.00 

Gross cash received for premiums $1,947,041.21 $1,575,754.77 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums, 125,221.97 395.805.07 

Net cash received for premiums $1,821,819.24 $1,179,949.70 $3,001,768.94 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 59,999.97 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources.. 101,404.14 

Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks $53,415.08 

Aggregate amount of income $3,163,173.05 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $1,982,226.67 $1,190,292.81 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 203,890.52 

Net amount paid for losses $1 ,982,226.67 $986,402.29 $2,968,628.96 



Dividends actually paid 97,500.00 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 393,294.58 

Paid for salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 60,000.00 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 74,731.12 

All other payments and expenditures 134,948.49 

Deposit premium returned on perpetual fire risks $5,593.65 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $3,729,103.15 



LAMAR INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York, N. Y, 

[Organized or Incorporated, April 3, 1872.] 

ISAAC N. ST. JOHN, President. WM. R. MacDANIEL, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. M. WEBSTER, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capita] authorized $200,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



105 



II. ASSETS. 
Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



United States 5-20 bonds, 1865, new. 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1868 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1867 

Total par and market value. . . . 



Par 
Value. 


Market 
Value. 




$50,000.00 


$56,125,00 




50,000.00 


57,125 00 




100,000.00 


114,250.00 




$200,000.00 


$227,500.00 


$227,500.00 



Central National Bank of New York stock 

United States.5-20 bonds 

United States 5-20 bonds 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 

Value. 
$3,000 
5,000 
28,000 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . . 



Market 
Value. 
$3,300 
5,700 
31,920 



Amount 
loaned. 

§2,500 
5,000 

28,000 



$36,000 $40,920 $35,500 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to tbe Company 

Aggregate amount of the assets of the company stated at their actual value. 



135,500.00 

329.76 

2,451.80 

45.50 

12,612.44 

600.00 



$279,039.50 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 

Ile-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $45,033.47 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 1 ,999.7 1 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on inland navigation risks 50.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up stock 



$41,350.00 



$47,083.18 



$88,433.18 
200,000.00 

$288,433.18 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross cash received for premiums 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate and return premiums. 

Net cash received for premiums 



Fire. 
)8,475.4S 
4,734.85 



$93,740.63 



Inland . 
$7,615.50 
185.04 

$7,430.46 $101,171.09 



Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 

Received from all other sources 

Received for calls on capital $70,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash 

14 



9,378.63 
5,041.76 



$115,591.48 



106 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Inland. 

Net amount paid for losses $83,607.68 $3,554.04 $87,161.72 



Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 8,183.05 

Salaries, fees, and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 11,848.33 

State, national, and local taxes 2,261.44 

All other payments and expenditures 10,355.38 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash $1 19,809.92 



LANCASTER FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Lancaster, Pa. 

[Organized or Incorporated, April 16, 1838. Re-organized, November 14, 1867. J 

THOMAS E. FRANKLIN, President. BENJAMIN F. SHENK, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, SILAS CHAPMAN, Jr., Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

"Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually p rid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by company, unincumbered $23,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 70,440.00 

Interest accrued on said bond and mortgage loans 4,479.39 

Value of lands mortgaged $1 10,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 250,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $360,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

U. S. 5-20 bonds $4,000.00 $4,540.00 

Delaware State bonds 7,000.00 7,000.00 

Camden & Amboy R. R. bonds 3,000.00 2,820.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



107 



Delaware & Raritan Canal (C. & A. B. R.) bonds. 

Lehigh Valley R. R,, 1st mort. bonds 

Union Pacific R. R. 1 st mort. bonds 

Connecting Railway Co. bonds 

Farmers National Bank stock 

Columbia National Bank stock 

Total par and market value 



1,000.00 


910.00 




5,000.00 


4,850.00 




10,000.00 


8,750.00 




1,000.00 


860.00 




2,550.00 


4,080.00 




1,500.00 


2,025.00 
$35,835.00 




$35,050.00 


$35,835.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Strasburg National Bank stock 

Inland Ins. & Dep. Co. stock 

Columbia National Bank stock 

Farmers National Bank stock 

Bridgeport & Horseshoe Turnpike Co. stock 

Manor Turnpike Co. stock 

Conistoga & Big Spring Turnpike Co. stock 

Lancaster Gas Co. stock 

Columbia Gas Co. stock 

Hamtramck Iron Co. stock 

Lake Superior & Detroit M'f 'g Co. stock 

Enterprise Coal Co. stock 

Marietta & May town Turnpike Co. stock 

Lancaster & Marietta Turnpike Co. stock 

State Normal School bonds 

Schuylkill Navigation Co. bonds 

Allegheny county bonds 

V. S. 5-20 bonds 

Union Pacific 1st mort. bonds 

Penna. Railroad 1st mort. bonds 

Harrisburg, Portsmouth & Lancaster It. R. bonds. 

Lehigh Valley R. R. 7's 

Lehigh Valley R. R. 6's 

Bridgeton & Port Norris R. R. Co. bonds 

Lawrence county bonds 

City of New Orleans bonds 



Total par and market value and amount loaned. 



Par 


Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$1,400 


81,820 


$1,750 


1,000 


1,000 


828 


600 


810 


625 


4,900 


7,810 


6,750 


625 


500 


250 


1,000 


1,500 


1,000 


675 
1,325 


675 ) 
1,590 } 


2,000 


500 


600 


450 


300 


300 


250 


10,000 


15,000 


3,000 


18,000 


5,400 


2,400 


400 


640 


400 


1,625 


1,300 


1,100 


2,500 


2,500 


2,100 


6,000 


4,800 


4,000 


6,000 


5,400 


4,860 


15,150 


17,195.25 


15,200 


3,000 


2,820 


2,750 


5,000 


5,000 


4,800 


2,000 


2,000 


1,900 


3,000 


3,060 


3,000 


1,000 


1,000 


900 


3,000 


2,850 


2,800 


800 


800 


700 


1,500 


1,350 


1,250 



$91,300 $87,750.25 $65,063 



All other loans on mortgage and judgment bonds 

Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, past due, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks. . 
All other property belonging to the company 

Aggregate assets of the company stated at their actual value. 



$65,063.00 

18,980.00 
5.99 

33,199.86 
1,322.18 

28,045.23 
3,876.22 
3,343.97 



$287,590.84 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. , 

Losses resisted, including interest and other expenses thereon 

Net amount of unpaid losses 



$6,874.13 
6,000.00 
2,500.00 



$15,374.13 



108 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Be-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less. $26,343.02 

Ee-insuranee, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 20,378.59 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks 46,721.61 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies 2,123.51 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 320.42 

Due and to become due for borrowed money. 20,000.00 

All other demands against the company 1,612.74 

Total liabilities, except stock $86,152.41 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 1,438.43 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus 8287,590.84 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $184,032.78 

Deduct reinsurance, rebate, and return premiums 76,907.78 

Net cash actually received for premiums $107,1 25.00 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 5,576.66 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 5,539.01 

Received from all other sources 1 ,729.58 

Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks 362.25 

Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash.. . SI 19,970.25 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses S135,744.68 

Deduct salvages 600.00 

Net amount paid for losses $135,144 68 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 23,1 1 7.03 

Salaries, fees, and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 4,996.52 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 3,530.20 

All other payments and expenditures 8,086.56 

Deposit premium returned on perpetual fire risks $189.40 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash ? 174,874.99 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



109 



LORILLARD INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Loouted in New York City. 
[Organized or Incorporated December, 1871.] 
CARLISLE NORWOOD, President. JOHN C. MILLS, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, R. S. BURT, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized. 
Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 



$300,000.00 
300,000.00 



II. ASSETS. 

Lease owned by the Company $5,032.50 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $258,100.00 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loans 8,858.50 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $139,750.00) $813,000.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Par 
value. 



Market 
value 



Amount 
loaned. 



Commercial Bank stock, Brooklyn, N. Y 810,000 S10,000 $5,000 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned $1,000 §10,000 S5.000 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. 



$5,000.00 

4,343.57 

86,839.85 

175.00 

29,083.13 



$397,432.55 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year 

Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year. 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 



$62,799.14 
1,754.57 



$21,500.00 



64,553.71 

$86,053.71 

300,000.00 

11,378.84 



Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $397,432.55 



110 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $165,167.19 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 16,417.59 

Net cash actually received for premiums $148,749.60 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 11,667.59 

Received for calls on capital $100,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year, in cash $160,417.19 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid for losses $137,265.70 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage , 19,481 .12 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employees 22,500.00 

Amount paid for state, national, and local taxes 6,322.95 

All other payments and expenditures 15,531.50 

Aggregate amount of expenditures during the year, in cash $201,101.27 



MANHATTAN INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 
[Incorporated January, 1872.] 

ANDREW J. SMITH, President. JOHN H. BEDELL, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. R. CO WLES, Norwalk. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaran teed capital authorized $250,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash, 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens,) $105,063.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 1,277.86 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

value. value. 

United States 10-40 bonds $76,000.00 $84,260.00 

United States Union Pacific bonds 100,000.00 1 13,500.00 

Brooklyn City 7 per cent, bonds 40,000.00 40,000.00 

South Carolina bonds 20,000.00 4,900.00 

Total par and market value $236,000.00 $242,660.00 $242,660.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



Ill 



Loans on collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

United States 5-20 bonds $5,000 



Brewers & Maltsters Ins. Co. stock. 



United States bonds, 1S81 

" " 10-40 bonds 

Dry Dock & E. Broadway R. K. stock. 
United States 5-20 bonds 



2,000 
2,500 
6,000 
5,000 
3,400 
1,000 



Total par and market Talue and amount loaned $23,900 



Market 
Talue. 

$5,600 
2,000 
2,500 
5,750 
5,600 
3,400 
1,150 



$26,000 



Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stock not included in " market value" . 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 



Amount 
loaned. 

$4,0S5.56 
1,500 
2,250 
4,500 
5,000 
2,500 
1,000 



$20,835.56 $20,835.56 



Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. . . . 



67,730.83 

3,000.00 

722.14 

52,479.80 



$493,769.19 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Net amount of unpaid losses $45,000.00 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $147,200.00 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . 1,275.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $493,769. 1 9 



148,475.00 

$193,475.00 

25O,U0O.OO 

50,294.19 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. 



Gross cash received for premiums $358,078.65 

Deduct rc-insurance, rebate, and return premium, 12,422.97 

Net cash received for premiums $345,655.68 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Interest and dividends received from all other sources. 



Aggregate income received during the year in cash. 



Marine and 
Inland. 

$6,000.00 



$6,000.00 $351,655.68 



3,759.62 
9,230.00 



$362,645.30 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid during the year for losses 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes. 
All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash 



$34,266.96 
53,114.31 
13,425.00 
21,867.71 

$182,673.98 



112 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

MERCHANTS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Providence, R. I. 

[Organized or Incorporated, May, 1851.] 

WALTER PAINE, President. CHARLES FOSTER, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

"Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized 8200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

. Par Market 

Value. Value. 

National Bank of Commerce stock $80,000.00 $86,400.00 

American National Bank stock 50,000.00 54,500.00 

Merchants National Bank stock 20,000.00 23,200.00 

Globe National Bank stock 20,000.00 23,200.00 

Providence Gas Company stock 20,000.00 34,800.00 

Phoenix National Bank stock 10,000.00 14,000.00 

Mechanics National Bank stock 12,850.00 16,705.00 

Manufacturers National Bank stock 10,200.00 11,832.00 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. stock 5,000.00 5,950.00 

TJ. S. 5-20 bonds, 1887 50,000.00 58,625.00 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, 1885 10,000.00 11,662 50 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, 1884 10,000.00 11,275.00 

Total par and market value $298,050 00 $352,149.50 $352,149.50 



Cash in the Company's principal office.. $3,188.83 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 68,780.39 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value 5,471.48 

Net premiums in due course of collection 10,444.27 

Aggregate amount of Assets stated at their actual value $440,034.47 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $114,449.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses... 92,281.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $206,730.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 113 

Re-insurance upon fire ri*ks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $80,197.31 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year.. . . 6,381.80 
Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 27.50 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 86,606.61 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $293,336.61 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Aggregate amount of all liabilities, including paid-up capital and net surplus. $493,336.61 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland . 

Gross cash received for premiums $185,294.41 $8,912.55 

Deduct reinsurance, and return premiums 14,432.25 739.95 

Net cash received for premiums 



$170,862.16 



$8,172.60 



Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 
Received for assessment $100,000.00 

Aggregate amount received during the year in cash 



$179,034.76 
25,160.06 

$204,194.82 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross amount paid for losses 

Deduct amounts received for salvages, &c. . . 

Net amount paid during the year for losses. 



Fire. 
$146,919.31 
1,812.60 

$145,106.71 



Marine and Inland. 
$4,997.15 
3,465.82 

$1,531.33 $146,638.04 



Cash dividends actually paid 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes. 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash 



$20,000.00 

27,276.70 

10,179.75 

6,950.84 

1,489.69 

$212,535.02 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 

Of the condition of the Merchants Insurance Company, February 20, 1873. 

I. ASSETS. 
Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

National Bank of Commerce stock $89,600.00 

American National Bank stock 55,000.00 

Merchants National Bank stock 23,200.00 

Globe National Bank stock 24,000.00 

15 



114 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Providence Gas Co. stock $34,000.00 

Phcnix National Bank stock 14,000.00 

Mechanics National Bank stock 16,705.00 

Manufacturers National Bank stock 11, 832.00 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. stock 6,050.00 

$274,387.00 

Cash in bank 54,517.02 

Cash on hand and in due course of collection, net 19,256.18 

Accrued interest, not included in market value 4,962.40 

Total $353,122.60 



H. LIABILITIES. 

Outstanding losses $70,721.00 

Re-insurance fund at 50 per cent 81,879.54 

Re-insurance fund, pro rata 6,794.25 

Capital stock 200,000.00 

Uncollected assessment $8,029.25 

$359,394.79 



NARRAGANSETT FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE 

COMPANY. 



Located in Providence, R. I. 

[Organized or Incorporated, July, 1859.] 

HENRY HARRIS, President. IRA A. FOSTER, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage, not more than one year's interest due $120,784.79 

Interest due and accrued on said bond and mortgage loans 2,649.03 

Value of lands mortgaged $27,63S.00 

"Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $259,000.00) 413,152.54 

Total value of said mortgaged premises $440,790.54 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. " 115 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the. Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

First National Bank stock $00,000.00 $73,200.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock 32,000.00 34,880.00 

Commercial National Bank stock 27,650.00 30,138.50 

American National Bank stock 25,800.00 • 28,380.00 

National Bank of North America stock 20,000 00 23,800/ 

Merchants National Bank stock 13,900.00 16,124.00 

Manufacturers National Bank stock 6,000.00 6,840.00 

Union Bank stock 5,600.00 5,712.00 

Central National Bank stock, New York 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Blackstonc Canal National Bank stock 3,925.00 4,239.00 

Rhode Island National Bank stock 2,100.00 1,680.00 



Total par and market value $201,975.00 $229,993.50 $229,993.50 



Cash in the Company's principal office $125.00 

Cash belonging to the Company depo-ited in bank 58,371.01 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 68,878.01 

Bills receivable, not matured and past due, taken for fire, marine and inland risks. 41,751.32 

All other property belonging to the company 1 6,01 2.55 

Gross amount of all the assets of the company $538,565.21 

Amount to be deducted from assets on account of bad and doubtful debts. . . 5,000 00 

Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value $533,565.21 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $21 ,050.87 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 96,359.04 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 4,500.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $121,909.91 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $109,627.14 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . 24,903.83 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 134,530.97 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 2,620.85 

All other demands against the company 12,392.02 

Total amount of all liabilities, except stock $271,453.75 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 250,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 12,111.46 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and surplus $533,565.21 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross premiums received in cash $277,406.44 $102,791.50 

Gross cash received ou bills and notes 38,327.13 

Gross cash received for premiums $277,400.44 $141,118.63 

Deduct re insurance, rebate and return premiums. 19,610 54 29,722.48 

Net cash actually received for premiums.. . . $257,795.90 $111,396.15 $369,192.05 



116 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Bills and notes received tor premiums remaining' unpaid $26,793.75 

Received for inn n st on bonds and mortgages 9,361.10 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, stock loans, &c 48,472 94 

Aggregate income actually received during the year in casli $427,026.09 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses $365,058.40 $169,277.29 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 5,869.44 



Net amount paid during the year for losses. $365,058.40 $163,407.85 $528,466.25 



Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 45,495.26 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 25,559.60 

Paid for state, national and local taxes 8,61 1 .22 



Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $608,132.33 



NATIONAL FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Plsx. 

[Incorporated, 1869.] 

SIMON J. STENE, President. W. D. HALFMAN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. S. LESTER, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $75,666.67 

Loans on bonds and mortgage, (first liens) 83,149.76 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 2,234.05 

Value of lands mortgaged $297,900.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for $52,000) 148,100.00 

Value of mortgaged premies $446,000.00 

Slocks and Bonds owned by the Compauy. 

Par Market 

Vnlue. Value. 

Northern Pacific 11. R. bonds, 7 3-10 per cent, gold, $30,000.00 $30,000.00 

Pittsburg, St. Louis & Cincinnati R. B. bonds 20,000.00 18,000.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



117 



Philadelphia & Reading R. R. bonds $30,000.00 

Schuylkill Iron Co. bonds, 7 percent 17,500.00 

Press Loan & Building Association stock 201 .00 

W. H. Taylor Loan & Building Association stock. 225. 00 

Lebanon Paper stock 2,000.00 

Total par and market value $99,926.00 



$27,000.00 

17,500.00 

201.00 

225.00 

2,500.00 

$95,426.00 ' $95,426.00 



Loaned on Collaterals. 



National Fire and Marine Ins. Co. stock 

Total par and market Talue and amount loaned thereon. . 



Par 
Value. 


Market 

Value. 


Amount 
Loaned. 


§7,000 


$7,000 


$4,788 



$7,000 $7,000 $4,788 



Bills receivable 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in "market value". 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Bond secured by mortgage 

All other property belonging to the Company 

Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value 



$7,668.33 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $3,528.39 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . . 17,700.00 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses. .'. . . 6,000.00 



Gross amount of claims for losses. 
Deduct salvages and reinsurance 



$27,228.39 
5,018.00 



Net amount of unpaid losses 

Reinsurance at 50 percent, on fire risks running one year or less. . $91,658.77 
Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year 4,762.32 



Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks. . . . 
Amount rcclaimable by the insured on perpetual tire policies. 
All other demands against the Company 



Total liabilities except capital stock.. . 
Joint-stock capital actually paid up in cash. 

• Aggregate liabilities, including stock. . 



$4,788.00 



8,302.49 

51,064.18 

764.30 

82,448.64 

4,000.00 

4,008.20 



$411,852.29 



$22,210.39 



$96,421.09 

1,178.00 

16,489.72 

$136,299.20 
$300,000.00 

$436,2y9.20 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash $205,119.27 . 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 11,251.67 

Net cash actually received for premiums $1 93,867.60 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 478.30 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 6,024.54 

Income received from all other sources 4,645.81 

Received for calls on capital $300,000 

Aggregate amount of incoino actually received during the year in cash, $205,016.25 



118 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $31,584.06 

Deduct re-insurance thereon 4,925.00 

Net amount paid for losses $26,659.06 

Paid or allowed for commissions and brokerage 17,469.95 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 14,604.56 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 3,164.60 

All other payments and expenditures 27,234.07 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $89,132.24 



NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York City. 

[Incorporated, 1838.] 

HENRY T. DROWNE, President. HENRY H. HALL,Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, A. P. COLLINS, New Britain. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered $2,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 190,450.00 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgage loans 3,022.34 

Total value of mortgaged premises $520,000.00 

Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value. value. loaned. 

Bank of the Commonwealth stock $1,000 $860 $315 

Bank of the State of N. Y. stock 4,300 r 4,640 8,750 

National Mechanic! Liauking Association stock 2,000 2,000 1,500 

National Bank of Commerce stock 2,000 2,340 2,000 

" " " 600 700) 

National Trust Co. stock, N. Y 600 650 i 1,000 

V. S. bonds 300 350 ) 

Ninth Nat. Bank stock 1,500 1.800 600 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



119 



XT. S. 5-20 bonds $1,450 $1,700 SI ,300 

Lenox Fire Ins. Co. stock 600 600 350 

Nassau Bank stock, N. Y 600 600 270 

Williamsburg Gas Light Co. scrip 2,500 2,500 2,000 

Fulton Bank stock, Brooklyn 2,000 2,000 1,500 

Mechanics Bank stock, Brooklyn 1,500 2.250 1,500 

U.S5-20bonds 1,000 1,170 900 

Delaware & Iludsou Canal Co. stock 15,000 17,700 15,000 

U. S. bonds GOO 675 ) 

Lenox Fire Ins. Co. stock 875 875 > 1,500 

Citizens Fire Ins. Co. stock 200 200 ) 

U. S. registered bond 3,000 3.375 3,000 

Dry Dock, E. Broadway & Battery R. R. Co. stock 2,100 1,700 1,500 

Bordentowu Banking Co. stock, N. J 2,000 2,400 2,000 

St. Nicholas Ins. Co. stock 400 450 400 

Manhattan Ins. Co. stock 2,500 3,000 

Total par and market value, and amount loaned thereon $48,525 $51,235 §43,385 $43,385.00 

Cash in the Company's principal office $9,932.08 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 85,802.99 

Deposited in N. Y. Life Ins. & Trust Co 28,046.41 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 214.59 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 5,156.72 

N. Y. Produce Exchange stock 200.00 

Due from agents and branch offices 7,500.00 

All other property belonging to the Company 250.00 

Aggregate amount of assets ; $375,960.13 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses $90,306.53 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, of prem. on fire risks under one year. $70,346.00 

Re-insurance pro rata, on fire risks more than one year 3,500.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 70,450.00 

Due and accrued for rent, etc G66.66 

Total liabilities, except capital stock $161,423.19 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 14,536.94 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $375,960.13 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross cash received for premiums $174,428.66 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 14,694.68 

Net cash received for premiums $159,733.98 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 16,391.70 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources.. 3,341.07 

Received for calls on capital $80,000.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash $179,466. 75 



120 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $109,881 .96 

Deduct re-insurance and salvages 4,207.11 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $105,074.85 

Cash dividends actually paid 10,000.00 

Paid for commissions and brokerage 18,651.51 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other cmploy6s 13,391.63 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 7,491.03 

All other payments and expenditures, viz : rent, traveling expenses, &c 26,102.54 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash 8181,311.56 



NEWPORT FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Newport, R. I. 

[Organized November 1, 1871. Incorporated, 1859.] 

J. H. DE WOLF, President. RESOLVED WATERMAN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, A. M. HURLBURT, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $200,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Stocks and bonds owned by the Company. 



Mechanics National Bank stock, Providence. 
Blackstone Canal Nat'l Bank stock, Providence 

American National Bank stock, Providence 

Commercial National Bank stock, Providence. 
National Bank of North America stock, Prov'ce 
Merchants National Bank stock, Providence... 
National Bank of Commerce stock, New York. 
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. stock 



Par Market 

Value. Value. 

$9,050.00 $10,860.00 

30,000.00 31,200.00 

15,000.00 16,800.00 

10,000.00 10,800.00 

15,000.00 17,700.00 

5,000.00 5,700.00 

10,000.00 11,250.00 

10,000.00 11,950.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



121 



Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. bonds 15,000.00 

Rensalaer, Hud. River & Saratoga R. R. Co. b's 12,000.00 

City of Chicago Buckner bonds 20,000.00 

What Cheer Corporation (real estate) stock 

Total par and market value $ 1 5 1 ,050.00 



15,300.00 
12,240.00 
20,000.00 
30,000.00 

$193,800.00 $193,800.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 



United States 5-20 bonds., 



Old National Bank of Providence stock 

Central Park, North & East River R. R. bonds 

Total par and market value and amount loaned. 



Par 


Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$20,000 


$23,220 


$19,000 


1,000 


1,175 


1,000 


1,000 


1,175 


1,000 


5.000 


6,084 


5,000 


2,000 


1,500 


1,500 



$29,000 



$33,154 $27,500 



Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value. 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, taken for fire, marine and inland risks 

All other property belonging to the company 



Aggregate amount of assets of the company stated at their actual value. 



$27,500.00 

57,027.68 
39,659.87 

1,091.33 

405.66 

33,524.15 

13,159.87 

2,811.26 



$368,979.82 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $66,800.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . 49,215.33 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs and other expenses 5,500.00 

Gross amount of claims for losses $121,515.33 

Deduct re-insurance 14,181 00 

Net amount of unpaid losses 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less. $25,658.77 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. * 10,217.92 
Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 26,091.25 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses 

Due for re-insurance 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock 

16 



$107,334.33 



$61,967.94 

369.00 

451.87 

3,449.71 

$173,572.85 
200,000.00 

$373,572.85 



122 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross premiums received in cash 

Gross cash received on bills and notes 

Gross cash received for premiums 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate and return premiums. 

Net cash received for premiums 



Fire. 
$85,461.97 

$85,461.97 
11,782.19 

$73,679.78 



Bills and notes received for premiums remaining unpaid. 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Received for calls on capital 



Marine and Inland. 

$62,447.33 

56,830.95 

$119,278.28 
50,608.56 



$68,669.72 



$13,159.87 



$52,500.00 



$142,349.50 
4,308.61 



Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash $146,658.1 1 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross amount actually paid for losses 

Deduct amounts received for re-insurance. 



Fire. 
845,236.93 
8,812.87 



Marine anil Inland. 
$24,289.70 
6,130.89 



Net amount paid during the year for losses. $36,424.06 $18,158.81 $54,582.87 



Cash dividends actually paid 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks and other employes 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash. 



11,631.00 

11,027.83 

6,200.00 

1,696.64 

6,062.88 



$91,201.22 



NIAGARA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York, N. Y. 

[Organized or Incorporated, August, 1850.] 

HENRY A. HOWE, President. PETER NOTMAN, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. C. KIMBALL, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $500,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash ; . 500,000.00 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



123 



II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered 

Loans on bond and mortgage 

Interest due and accrued on bonds and mortgages 

Value of lands mortgaged $200,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $185,250 00).. . . 240,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $440,000.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 



$22,725.95 

154,000.00 

5,390.00 



United States 6 per cent, bonds, 1881 

" 5-20 bonds, 18G4 

5-20 bonds, 1865 

" 10-40 bonds 

" 6 per cent, currency bonds. 

Tennessee 6 per cent, bonds 

Alabama 8 per cent, bonds 

Total par and market value 



Par 


Market 


Value. 


Value. 


$133,000.00 


$152,950.00 


40,000.00 


45,200.00 


255,000.00 


288,150 00 


100,000.00 


110,000.00 


110,000.00 


124,300.00 


20,000.00 


16,000.00 


10,000 00 


9,000.00 


$668,000.00 


$745,600.00 $745,600.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 






Central R. R. of N. J. stock 

United States 5-20 bonds 

Delaware. Lackawanna & Western R. R. Co. stock. 

N. J. Zinc Co. stock 

Buffalo R. R. and Erie R. R. Co. bonds 

Delaware & Hudson Canal stock 

Bank of the Republic stock, New York 

U. S. Express stock 

South Carolina State bonds 

Metropolitan Gas Co. stock 

Commercial Fire Insurance Co. stock 

Farragut Fire Insurance Co. stock 

Brooklyn & Newtown R. R Co. bonds 



Par 
Value. 
$200,000 
2,000 

26,100 

4.800 
5,000 

40,000 

1,200 

1,000 

1,000 



Market 

Value. 

$200,000 

2,300 

25,000 

5,760 
5,500 

20,400 

1,800 

1,000 

1,000 



Amount 
Loaned. 

$150,000 
1,500 

17,000 

5,000 
3,000 

16,500 

500 

750 

800 



Total par and market value and amount loaned $281,100 $262,760 $195,050 



$195,050.00 



Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank . 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

All other property belonging to the company 



17,007.25 

6,267.00 

116,948.05 

1,550.00 



Aggregate amount of assets stated at their actual value $1,264,538.25 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses. . . $233,088.00 
Losses resisted, including interest, costs and expenses thereon. . . 13,612.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses 



$246,700.00 



124 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Re-insurancc on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent. $31 1,184.69 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 74,508.59 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks .386,000.00 

Cash dividends to stockholders remaining unpaid 35.25 

Total liabilities except capital stock $632,735.25 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 500,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital. 131,803.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital stock and net surplus $1,264,538.25 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $786,810.00 $1,151.58 

Deduct reinsurance and return premiums 59,696.87 

Net cash actually received for premiums $727,113.13 $1,151.58 $728,264.71 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 1 1,130.00 



i &"& 



Received for interest and dividends on stocks, bonds, and from all other sources. 62,241.96 

Received from all other sources 5,507.00 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash §807,143.67 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Fire. Marine and Inland. 

Gross amount actually paid for losses $554,650.63 $3,730.47 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 8,420.90 91.21 

Net amount paid for losses $546,229.73 $3,639.26 $549,868.99 



Cash dividends actually paid 52.00 

Paid for commissions or brokerage 109,906.66 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 37,381 .40 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 23,609.16 

All other payments and expenditures 78,926.67 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash $799,744 88 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



125 



NORTH MISSOURI FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Macon, Mo. 
[Organized or Incorporated July, 1867.] » 

JOHN F. WILLIAMS, President. ALBERT LARABEE, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, GEO. R. COWLES, Norwalk. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized .... $500,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 350,000.00 

n. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company $37,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) 175,662.26 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 6,460.99 

Value of lands mortgaged $31 8,305.00 

"Value of buildings mortgaged 88,205.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $406,510.00 






Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 
Value. 

Macon County R. R. bonds $43,700.00 

Schuyler County R. R. bonds 75,000.00 

Pike County R. R. bonds 20,000.00 

Clark County R. R. bonds 4,500.00 

Memphis Scotland County R. R. bonds 1,000.00 

Carrollton, Mo., School bonds 100.00 

Limuns, Mo., School bonds 240.00 

South Carolina State bonds, (old) 20,000.00 

North Carolina State bonds, (old) 23,000.00 

Keokuk & Kansas City R. R. stock 1,000.00 

Mound City Life Ins. Co. stock 1 0,000.00 

Total par and market value $1 98,540.00 



Market 
Value. 

$37,145.00 

63,750.00 

18,000.00 

3,600.00 

800.00 

100.00 

240.00 

10,000.00 

8,050.00 

800 00 

10,000.00 

$152,485.00 $152,485.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

Value. 

North Missouri Ins. Co. stock $37,000 

City of California, Mo., bonds 1,900 

Keokuk & Kansas City R. R. stock 800 

Total par and market value and amount loaned $39,700 



Market 
Value. 

§37,000 

1,900 

800 



Amount 
Loaned. 

$18,580.53 
900 
778.89 



700 $20,259.42 $20,259.42 



126 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Offi-e furniture, etc 10,221.73 

Cash in the Company's principal office 7,201.12 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 71,223.78 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 600.00 

Net premiums in due course of collection 186,650.62 

Bills receivable taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 78,807.13 

All other property belonging to the Company 575.00 



Aggregate assets stated at their actual value S747.U7.05 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported or supposed losses 55,478.18 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 6,000.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $61,478.18 

Re-insurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 percent. $244,418.97 
Re-insurance on fire risks running more than one year, pro rata. . 86,153.62 

Re-insurance on marine risks 5,924.88 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks 336,497.47 



Total liabilities, except stock $397,975.65 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 350,000.00 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital $747,975.65 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $774,099.19 $84,889.52 

Received on bills and notes taken for premiums.. 8,243.43 

Gross cash received for premiums $782,342.62 $84,889.52 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums, 59,788.90 

Net cash received for premiums $722,553.72 $84,889.52 $807,443.24 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 10,767.26 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources.. 2,910.00 

Income received from all other sources 5,351 .83 

Received for increased capital $150,000.00 

Aggregate amount of income $826,472.33 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $270,607.99 $32,464.53 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 2,000.00 458.39 

Net amount paid for losses $268,607.99 $32,006.14 $300,614.13 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 127 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage $1 55,203.67 

Paid for salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 28,211.34 

Paid state, national, and local taxes 8,122.00 

All other payments and expenditures 76,061.05 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $568,212.19 



PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Philadelphia, Penn. 

[Organized or Incorporated March, 1825.] 

DANIEL SMITH, Jk., President. WILLIAM G. CROWELL, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, B. R. ALLEN, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Amount of joint-stock or guaranteed capital authorized $400,000.00 

Amount of capital actually paid up in cash 400,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unincumbered $60,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 480,957.00 

7,803.00 



Value of buildings mortgaged, (insured for §290,234.00; $970,000.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Phila., Wil. & Bait. R. R. stock $12,500.00 $14,125.00 

Penn. R. R. Co. bonds 11,000.00 10,780.00 

Phila. & Reading R. R. Co. bonds 20,000.00 20,400.00 

Camden & Amboy R. R. Co. bonds 30,000.00 28,125.00 

.Phila. & Erie R. R. Co. bonds ;. 25,000.00 22,500.00 

North Penn. R. R. Co. bonds 30,000.00 30,000.00 

EDu-risbnrg, Mt. Joy, &c, R. R. Co. bonds 20,000 00 18,600.00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. bonds 30,000.00 28,500.00 

Elmira & Williamsport R. R. Co. bonds 25,000.00 23,250.00 

West Jetsey R. R. Co. bonds 10,000.00 10,300.00 

Penn. & N. York R. H. Co. bonds v . . 10,000.00 9,500.00 

United Canals & R. R. Co. bonds 10,000.00 9,100.00 

American Steam Ship Co. bonds 15,000.00 12,000.00 

Schuylkill Nav. Co. bonds 20,700.00 15,800.00 

Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. bonds 40,000.00 35,200.00 

Chesapeake & Del. Canal Co. bonds 10,000.00 8,700,00 

Delaware Division Canal Co. bonds 20,000.00 17,000.00 

Philadelphia City bonds, 5s 6,000.00 5,100.00 

Pittsburg City bonds, 7s 36,000.00 36,000.00 



128 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Pittsburg City bonds, 6s $6,000.00 $5,400.00 

Cincinnati City bonds, 6s 12,000.00 10,800.00 

Philadelphia Nat. Bank stock 1 8,000.00 29,520.00 

Manayunk Gas Co. stock 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Total par and market value $418,200.00 $401,700.00 



$401,700.00 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par 

value. 

Huntingdon & Broad Top R. R. Co bonds $5,000 

" 5'000 

" 4,500 



Market 

value. 

84,350 

4,350 

3,915 



Amount 

loaned. 

82,500 

2,500 

2,250 



Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon. . 814,500 812,615 $7,250 



87,250.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in " market value" 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 

Aggregate amount of all the Assets of the company at their actual value. . , 



23,792.84 

89,416.62 

4,224.00 

114,182.00 

$1,189,325.46 



III. LIABILITIES. 



Losses adjusted and unpaid, $103,065.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses.. . . 87,673.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses .* 

Ke-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $254,235.24 

Re-insurance pro rata, ou fire risks running more than one year 67,253.26 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies 

Dividends remaining unpaid 

All other demands against the Company 

Liabilities, except capital 

Capital stock paid up in cash 

Liabilities, including capital stock 



$190,738.00 



$321,488.50 

382,735.00 

682.50 

26,823.00 

$922,467.00 
400,000.00 

$1,322,467.00 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross cash received for premiums $622,985.03 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 42,129.79 

Net cash received for premiums '. 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources 

Income received from all other sources 



Deposit premiums received for perpetual fire risks. 



$32,885.19 



$580,855.24 
32,780.04 
42,975.42 
13,827.11 



Aggregate income received during the year in cash $670,437.81 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 129 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Gross amount paid for losses $539,771.44 

Deduct salvage and re-insurance 680.63 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $539,090.81 

Cash dividends actually paid 59,317.50 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 127,719.42 

Paid for salaries, fees, and all other charges of officers, clerks, etc 24,830.58 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 8,841.91 

All other payments and expenditures including taxes 9,670.68 

Aggregate amountof expenditures $760,470.90 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 

Of the Condition of the Pennsylvania Fire. Insurance Company, March 1st, 1873. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $400,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 400,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company $60,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage, (first liens) $469,457.00 

Interest due and accrued on all bond and mortgage loans 7,200.00 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Phila., Wil. & Del. R. R. Co. stock $12,500.00 $14,125.00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co. bonds 11,000.00 10,780.00 

Phila. & Reading R. R. Co. bonds 20,000.00 20,400.00 

Camden & Amboy R. R. Co. bonds 30,000 00 28,125.00 

Phila. & Erie R. R. Co. bonds 25,000.00 22,500.00 

North Penn. R. R. Co. bonds 30,000.00 30,000.00 

Harrisburg, Mt. Joy, &c, R. R. Co. bonds 20,000.00 1 8,600.00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. bonds 30,000.00 28,500.00 

Elmira & Williamsport R. R. Co. bonds 25,000.00 23,250.00 

West Jersey R. R. Co. bonds 10,000.00 10,300.00 

Penn. & N. York R. R. Co. bonds 10,000.00 9,500.00 

United Canal & R. R. Co. bonds 10,000.00 9,100.00 

American Steamship Co. bonds 15,000.00 12,000.00 

Schuylkill Navigation Co. bonds 20,700.00 15,800.00 

Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. bonds 40,000.00 35,200.00 

Chesapeake & Del. Canal Co. bonds 10,000.00 8,700.00 

17 



130 FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 

Delaware Division Canal Co. bonds 20,000.00 17,000.00 

Philadelphia City bonds, 5s 6,000.00 5,100.00 

Pittsburg City bonds, 7s 36,000.00 36,000.00 

" " " 6s 6,000.00 5,400.00 

Cincinnati City bonds, 6s 12,000.00 10,800.00 

Phila. National Bank stock 13,400.00 21,976.00 

Manayunk Gas Co. stock 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Total par and market value $413,600.00 $394,156.00 $394,156.00 



Cash in the Company's principal office 22,967.35 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 128,088.13 

Interest due and accrued on bonds not included in " market value" 3,460.00 

Gross premiums in due course of collection 63,457.00 

Bills receivable, matured 60,750.00 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value $1,209,535.48 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $7,000.00 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 35,640.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $42,640.00 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $290,460.00 

Re-insurance pro rata on fire risks running more than one year. . 68,450.00 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 358,910.00 

Amount reclaimable by the insured on perpetual fire insurance policies 384,455.47 

Cash dividends remaining unpaid 682.50 

All other demands against the Company 1 5,864.00 

Total liabilities, except stock $802,:>;)1 .97 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 400,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 6,983.51 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $1,209,535.48 



COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 



131 



PEOPLES INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Newark, N. J. 

[Organized or Incorporated, March 5, 1866.] 

JOHN M. RANDALL, President. J. H. LINDSLEY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, C. M. WEBSTER, Hartford. 

I. CAPITAL. 
.Amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $1,000,000.00 



Amount of capital actually paid up in cash. 



II. ASSETS. 

Loans on bond and mortgage on which not more than one year's interest is due. 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 

Value of lands mortgaged $281,200.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for $154,750.00) 225,000.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $546,200.00 



200,000.00 



172,750.00 
4,619.72 



Loans on Collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

Value. Value. loaned. 

Newark City Ice stock §12,600 $15,750) 

Newark & Irvington It. R. stock 200 200) 811,700 

Peoples Insurance stock 500 525 1 

Newark City Ice stock 4,100 5,125 i 

East Orange bonds 600 500 [ ' 

Orange & Newark R. R. stock 1,000 1,000 J 

Newark City Ice stock 4,200 5,250 3,800 

Merchants Insurance stock 4,000 4,400 2,800 

American Trust Co. stock 1,000 1,100 1,000 

Merchants Insurance stock 4,000 4,400 3,000 

Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. 1st mort. bonds 3,000 3,000 2,500 

Merchants Insurance stock 2,000 2,200 1,500 

First National Bank stock 6,000 7,800 J 

Merchants National Bank stock 1,000 1,000). ' 

American Trust Co. stock : 5,000 5,500 4,000 

Merchants Insurance stock 5,700 6,270 5,000 

Icestock... 8,900 13,125) 

Merchants & Manufacturers Bank stock 1,000 1,000 } ' 

Elizabeth city bonds 25,000 23,750 21,500 

Merchants Insurance stock 1,000 1,100 800 

City National Bank stock 2,550 3,825 ) 

Essex Co. Bank stock ; 1,600 2,320 J ' 

Newark & Irvington II. C. R. R. stock 13,000 13,000 800 

Citizens Gas Co. stock 6,250 6,250 5,000 

Total par and market value and amount loaned thereon $114,100 $128,390 $84,400 



184,400.00 



132 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Money in hands of agents 

All other property belonging to the Company. 

Aggregate amount of the assets of the company stated at their actual value. 



1,800.19 
12,874.68 

1,878.64 
12,757.78 
10,923.21 

2,000.00 



S304.004.22 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 

Reinsurance on fire risks running one year or less, at 50 per cent 

Principal unpaid on scrip or certificates of profits ordered to be redeemed. 

Total liabilities, except stock 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 

Surplus beyond capital 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up stock and surplus 



§5,000.00 

$60,038.83 

5,030.00 

$70,068.83 

200,000.00 

33,935.39 

$304,004.22 



IV. INCOME DURING THE TEAR. 



Gross cash received for premiums 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate and return premiums 

Net cash received for premiums 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages and call loans. 

Aggregate income received during the year in cash 



$143,555.05 
9,574.01 



$133,981.04 
14,429.34 

$148,410.38 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Net amount paid for losses 

Cash dividends actually paid 

Scrip or certificates of profit redeemed in cash 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes. 

State, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash 



$38,486.91 

15,000.00 

5,328.00 

18,813.00 

11,009.78 

1,394.58 

8,442.02 



$98,474.29 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



133 



PHENIX INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Brooklyn, N. Y. 
[Organized or Incorporated, September 10, 1853. J 

STEPHEN CROWELL, President. PHILANDER SHAW, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, E. B. GOODSELL, Bridgeport. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $1 ,000,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually prid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by company, unincumbered $225,000.00 

Loans on bond and mortgage 370,895.00 

Interest due and accrued on said bond and mortgage loans 8,082.20 

Value of lands mortgaged $364,1 50.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged 622,750.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $986,900.00 



Stocks and Bonds owned 



United States 5-20 bonds, 1864, coup 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1867, reg 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1868, coup 

United States 5-20 bonds, 1881, coup 

United States 10-40 bonds, reg 

Tennessee State bonds 

Virginia State bonds, consolidated 

Virginia State bonds, deferred 

North Carolina State bonds 

South Carolina State bonds 

Alabama State bonds 

Mississippi State bonds 

Kings county 6 per cent, bonds 

Kings county 7 per cent, bonds 

Assessment Fund bonds, city of Brooklyn 

Peoples Gas Light Co. bonds, city of Brooklyn.. 
Nassau Gas Light Co. certificates, Brooklyn. . . , 
Nassau Gas Light Co. stock, city of Brooklyn . . 

Union Ferry Ce. stock, Brooklyn 

Commercial Bank of Brooklyn stock 

Houston & Texas R. K. bonds 

Total par and market value 



led by the Company. 




Par 


Market 


Value. 


Value. 


$10,000.00 


$ 11,362.50 


235,200.00 


269,304 00 


6,350.00 


7,413.62 


55,000.00 


64,900.00 


77,000.00 


84,700.00 - 


35,000.00 


28,175.00 


29,544.67 


16,877.39 


14,772.33 


2,363.57 


10,000.00 


3,500.00 


20,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


8,800.00 


20,000.00 


18,000.00 


32,000.00 


32,000.00 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


12,313.39 


, 12,313.39 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


15,000.00 


17,250.00 


20,000.00 


24,000.00 


6,500.00 


9,750.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


$667,180.39 


$679,209.47 $679,209.47 



134 



FIRE AND FIKE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Loans on Collaterals. 



Montauk Fire Insurance Co. , Brooklyn 

Mechanics Fire Insurance Co., Brooklyn • 

Mechanics Bank, Brooklyn 

Shoe & Leather Bank, New York 

City Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Peter Cooper Insurance Co., New York 

Economical Printing Co., New York 

Bank of the State of New York 

American Fire Insurance Co., New York 

World Mutual Life Insurance Co., New York. 

Clinton Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Relief Fire Insurance Co., New York 

U. S. 5-20 bonds, 1868 

City of Brooklyn bonds 

Manhattan Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Union Trust Co., New York , 

TJ. S. bonds, Currency 6's 



Arctic Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Importers & Traders Fire Insurance Co., New York. 

Commercial Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Merchants Bank, New York 

Fireman's Trust Insurance Co., Brooklyn 

Market Bank, New York 

People's Gas Light Co. bonds, Brooklyn 

U. S 5-20 bonds, 1867 

Mechanics Bank, New York 

Manhattan Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Park Bank, New York 

German American Bank, New York 

Bank of the Republic, New York 

Union Ferry Co., Brooklyn 

Brooklyn City Railroad Co 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., New York 

Long Island Bank, Brooklyn 

Montauk Fire Insurance Co. , Brooklyn 

Germania Fire Insurance Co., New York 

Standard Fire Insurance Co., New York 



Par 

Value. 

$1,000 

500 

2,000 

800 

1,050 

1,100 

1,000 

1,800 

1,000 

1,000 

1,400 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

6,000 

13,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 
1,000 
1,000 

500 

1,500 

15,000 

300 

2,000 

10,000 

500 
5,000 
4,000 
1,000 
3,070 
2,800 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 



Market 


Amount 


Value. 


Loaned. 


$1,400] 




525 1 

3,000 [ 


$5,000 


1,216 J 




1,785 ) 
1,540 J 


2,000 


1,500 


1,000 


1,980 


1,000 


1,800 J 
1,000 J 


1,800 


1,820 ) 
2,000 J 


3,000 


1,170 j 
I, j 


2,000 


6,000 


5,000 


23,400 


17,000 


1,120 


200 


1,120 


250 


1,120 


450 


5,000 


1,500 


1,120 | 
1,070 J 


2,000 


1,220 


800 


560 J 

1,900 j 


2,000 


15,000 


12,150 


451 


300 


2,660 


1,500 


12,000 


9,500 


750 


500 


5,150 


4,500 


4,600 ] 




1,500 1 
5,372 | 


10,000 


3,360 J 




2,400 j 
1,400 j 


2,500 


1,000 


650 


1,500 


1,200 



Total par and market Taluc and amount loaned. 



1,820 S122,509 $87,800 



$87,800.00 



Cash in the company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stocks not included in market value 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, not matured and past due, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks. 
All other property belonging to the company 

Gross amount of all the assets of the company 

Amount to be deducted for bad and doubtful debts and securities 



4,772.91 
140,720.64 
4,418.71 
1,494.38 
213,048.17 
152,435.31 
111,766.55 



$1,999,643.34 
4,344.64 



Aggregate assets of the company stated at their actual value 31,995,298.70 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 



135 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $252,377.28 

Losses unadjusted, including- all reported and supposed losses. .. 99.S09.48 

Losses resisted, including interest and other expenses thereon 15,286.00 

Net amount of unpaid losses $367,472.76 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year or less. $405,299.51 
Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. 67,907.85 

Gross premiums on unexpired marine risks 100,724.92 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 573,932.28 

Total liabilities, except stock $941 ,405.04 

Joint stock capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 53,893.66 

Aggregate liabilities, including stock and net surplus $1,995,298.70 



IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 



Gross premiums received in cash $1,302,713.36 

Gross cash received on bills and notes 



Gross cash received for premiums $1,302,713.36 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate and return premiums. 108,993.31 

Net cash actually received for premiums.. 



Marine and Inland. 

$271,950.04 

236,519.49 

$508,469.53 
168,730.23 



$1,193,720.05 $339,739.30 $1,533,459.35 



Bills and notes received for premiums remaining unpaid $131,060.81 

Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources. 

Received from all other sources 

Aggregate income actually received during the year in cash 



25,257.66 
42,381.15 
15,849.56 



1,616,947.72 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 



Fire. 



Gross amount actually paid for losses $842,342. 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 

Net amount paid for losses 



Ularine and Inland. 

$296,468.16 

115,277.20 



$842,342.88 $181,190.96 $1,023,533 84 



Cash dividends actually paid 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 

Salaries, fees, and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes. 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 

All other payments and expenditures 

Aggregate amount of actual expenditures during the year in cash. 



100,000.00 
199,169.41 
101,408.43 
33,844.07 
111,573.51 



1,569,529.26 



136 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



PROVIDENCE WASHINGTON INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Providence, R. I. 

[Incorporated 1799.] 

JOHN KINGSBURY, President. WARREN S. GREENE, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, W. E. BAKER, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized. 
Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash, 



$500,000.00 
200,000.00 



II. ASSETS. 



Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par 

value. 

City of Chicago bonds, S. B. Buckner $25,000.00 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. bonds 25,000.00 



Market 
value. 

$25,000.00 

25,500.00 



Total par and market value $50,000.00 $50,500.00 $50,500.00 



Invested in participation account of R. I. Hospital Trust Co 

All other loans 

Cash in Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company, deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stock not included in " market value" 

Gross premiums in due course of collection. . . . .• 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, at their actual value. 



100,000.00 
6,225.00 

61,278.97 
8,035.18 
3,224.04 

21,590.38 



$250,853.57 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Net amount of unpaid losses $16,891.81 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks under one year $23,817.32 

Re-insurance, pro rata, on fire risks running more than one year. . . 6,499.92 

Amount required to safely re-insure all outstanding risks 30,31 7.24 

Due and accrued for salaries, rent, and other expenses ^. . . 500.00 

Total liabilities, except stock $47,709.05 

Stock capital actually paid up in cash 200,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 3,144.52 

Aggregate liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus , $250,853.57 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 137 



IV. INCOME DtJRING THE YEAR. 

Gross premiums received in cash, without any deduction $62,048.05 

Deduct only re-insurance, rebate, and return premiums 2,294.61 

Net casli actually received for premiums $59,753.44 

Interest and dividends received on bonds and mortgages and from other sources. 7,886.69 

Income received from all other sources 140.64 

Calls on capital, 560,000 ; Increased capital, $149,485 ; Total,. . . $209,485.00 

■Aggregate income received during the year in cash $67,780.77 

V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Net amount paid during the year for losses $78,947.24 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 7,972.23 

Salaries and other charges of officers, clerks, and other employes 4,151.53 

Paid for state, national, and local taxes 810.61 

All other payments and expenditures 5,194.97 

Aggregate expenditures during the year in cash $97,076.58 



REPUBLIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in New York Citt. 

[Organized or Incorporated, April, 1852.] 

ROBERT S. HONE, President. DUNCAN F. CURRY, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, J. F. BABCOCK, New Haven. 

I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized $300,000.00 

Whole amount of capital actually paid up in cash 300,000.00 

II. ASSETS. 

Real estate owned by the Company, unencumbered 73,975.95 

Loans on bond and mortgage $48,700.00 

Interest due and accrued on bond and mortgage loans 1,607.34 

Value of the land mortgaged $138,000.00 

Value of buildings mortgaged (insured for$18,000 as collateral), 20,500.00 

Total value of mortgaged premises $158,500.00 

18 



138 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



Slocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

Nat. Bank of Commerce stock §26,200.00 $29,606.00 

Gallatin Nat. Bank stock 5,000.00 6,000.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1864 40,000.00 45,255.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1 8G5 20,000.00 23,200.00 

United States 5-20 registered bonds, 1867 25,000.00 28,750.00 

United States currency bonds, sixes 25,000.00 28,500.00 

United States 10-40 reg. bonds 71,000.00 78,605.00 

N. Y. County 7 per cent, bonds 40,000.00 41,600.00 

N. Y. City 7 per cent, bonds 40,000.00 41,600.00 

New York Produce Exchange stock 200.00 300.00 

Del. & Hud. Canal Co. 7 per cent. mort. bonds. . . . 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Total par and market value $302,400.00 $333,386.00 $333,386.00 



Loans on collaterals. 

Par Market Amount 

value. value loaned. 

Del. & Hud. Canal Co. stock $10,000 $11,900 $10,000 

Broadway Bank stock 1,600 4,160 \ 

N. Y. Central & Hudson River R. R. stock 10,000 10,000 > 15,000 

South Side R. R. bonds 5,000 4.750 ) 

National Bank of Commerce stock 2,500 2,825 2,500 

« « ii « 1,500 1,095 1,600 

Panama R. R. stock 5,000 6,400 

« •• <■ 5,000 6,400 5, 

Nat. Bank of Commerce stock 6,000 6,780 6,099.67 

Nat. Bank of State of N. Y. stock 10,200 11,220 10,000 

United States 6 per cent, bonds, 1881 1,000 1,145 900 

Total par and market value, and amoiipt loaned $57,800 $67,275 $55,999.67 

Cash in the Company's principal office 

Cash belonging to the Company deposited in bank 

Interest due and accrued on stock not included in " market value" 

Interest due and accrued on collateral loans 

Net premiums in due course of collection 

Bills receivable, taken for fire, marine, and inland risks 

All other property belonging to the Company 

Assessment on capita! stock 

Aggregate amount of all assets of the Company, stated at their actual value. 



$5,999.67 



15; 

2 

50 

6 

6 

180 



545.22 
396.89 
,199.59 
39.21 
171.96 

,854.24 
466 66 
,000.00 



$775,342.73 



III. LIABILITIES. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid $180,599.43 

Losses unadjusted, including all reported and supposed losses 48,535.27 

Losses resisted, including interest, costs, and other expenses 9,561.27 

Gross amount of claims for losses $238,605.97 

Deduct re-insurance and salvages 3,264.85 

Net amount of unpaid losses 



$235,431.12 



COMPANIES OP OTHER STATES. 139 

Re-insurance at 50 per cent, on fire risks running one year $176,545.74 

Re-insurance pro rata on tire risks running more than one year. . . 44,136.43 

Amount required to safely reinsure all outstanding risks $220,682.17 

Interest due remaining unpaid 5,457.83 



Total amount of all liabilities, except capital stock $461,571.12 

Joint stock capital paid up in cash 300,000.00 

Surplus beyond capital 13,771.61 

Aggregate amount of liabilities, including paid-up capital and surplus $775,342.73 

IV. INCOME DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross cash received for premiums $487,170.77 $1,629.37 

Deduct re-insurance, rebate, and return premium, 39,754.31 478.04 



Net cash received for premiums $447,416.46 $1,151.33 $448,567.79 



Received for interest on bonds and mortgages 526.29 

Received for interest and dividends on stocks and bonds, and from other sources, 22,107.00 

Income from all other sources 13,258.69 

Received for calls on capital $180,000.00 



Aggregate income received during the year in cash $484,459.77 



V. EXPENDITURES DURING THE YEAR. 

Marine and 
Fire. Inland. 

Gross amount paid for losses $250,594.61 $3,519.07 

Deduct salvages and re-insurance 4,876.76 91.21 

Net amount paid for losses $245,717.85 $3,427.86 $249,145.71 

Paid or allowed for commissions or brokerage 65,219.31 

Paid for salaries, fees, and charges of officers, clerks, &c, 29,137.00 

Paid State, National, and local taxes in this and other States, 11,626.12 

All other payments and expenditures 58,361.01 

Aggregate Expenditures during the year in cash $413,489.15 



140 



FIRE AND FIRE-MARINE INSURANCE 



ROGER WILLIAMS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



Located in Pkovidence, R. I. 

[Organized or Incorporated, May, 1848.] 

ANDREW A. WILLIAMS, President. JOSEPH W. DAVENPORT, Secretary. 

Attorney in Connecticut, RALPH GDLLETT, Hartford. 



I. CAPITAL. 

Whole amount of joint stock or guaranteed capital authorized. 
Whole amount of capital actual!)' paid up in cash 



8500,000.00 
200,000.00 



H. ASSETS. 

Stocks and Bonds owned by the Company. 

Par Market 

Value. Value. 

American National Bank stock $15,000.00 $16,500.00 

Atlantic Bank stock 5,000.00 4,800.00 

National Bank of Commerce stock 25,000.00 27,500.00 

National Bank of North America stock 5,000.00 5,900.00 

Blackstone Canal National Bank stock 15,000.00 16,200.00 

Commercial National Bank stock 18,0